Cover of Philosophy Now
Already a subscriber? - Login here
Not yet a subscriber? - Subscribe here

Browse by:



Displaying: 41-60 of 3254 documents


general articles
41. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
Karen Parham Deleuze & Guattari’s Friendly Concepts
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Philosophers are friends and creators of concepts. This was certainly the view of the French philosophers Gilles Deleuze (1925-1995) and Felix Guattari (1930-1992). As they say in their book What Is Philosophy? (1991), “Philosophy is the discipline that involves creating concepts” (p.5). Certainly, no other discipline could have created concepts such as ‘tabula rasa’, ‘language games’ or ‘qualia’, but surely other disciplines have their own concepts? Well, according to Deleuze and Guattari, they do in the sense that they have concepts within a frame of reference – they invent concepts to label things already in existence – but they don’t create the thoughts behind them, as philosophy does.
42. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
Sujantra McKeever René Descartes: A Yogi?
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
One of history’s greatest philosophers was, by my estimation, also a great yogi. The Frenchman René Descartes (1596-1650) is often called ‘the father of modern philosophy’. He sat in his room and contemplated the mysteries of the mind. Yoga follows the same course to wisdom and understanding.
43. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
James Robinson Reason & Emotion
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
The heart and the mind, that is, emotion and reason, are often said to be in opposition. This is not so! This article aims to enhance our consciousness of the connection between the two.
fun, poetry & fiction
44. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
Brandon Robshaw John Stuart Mill
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
general articles
45. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
Chad Engelland Phenomenology at the Beach
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
At the beach, we soak up some sun, frolic in the surf, and swim with the waves – to name just a few of the activities possible. Apart from doing anything, though, it is exhilarating just to be at the beach. Why? What is the contemplative appeal of that place where the ocean meets the land?
46. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
Dean Ericksen Leibniz on Unicorns
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Saul Kripke may have argued that unicorns could not possibly exist, but if you’re personally unconvinced, you’d be in good company. When he wasn’t busy independently inventing infinitesimal calculus and devising his famous theodicy, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646-1716) found time to write about unicorns in what would become Protogaea (1749).
regulars
47. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
Martin Jenkins Brief Lives: C.S. Lewis
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
C.S. Lewis is today best known as a Christian apologist and the author of the Narnia series of children’s fantasy books, including The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe (1950). It is therefore easy to forget that his original training, and his first academic post, were in philosophy. That training marked almost everything that he wrote and broadcast.
48. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
Thiago Pinho Interview: Martin Savransky
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
fun, poetry & fiction
49. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
Melissa Felder Simon & Finn Melissa Felder
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
regulars
50. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
Steve Brewer, David Morling, Terry Hyde, Adam Hitchcock, Tom Chamberlain Letters to the Editor
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
51. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
Peter Adamson Philosophy Then: Evil Overruled
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Today’s philosophers of religion devote considerable attention to the problem of evil: If God is both perfectly good and allpowerful, why do evil and suffering exist? This poses a considerable challenge to Jewish, Christian and Muslim (a.k.a. ‘Abrahamic’) theism, since if God is good, presumably he’d want to prevent evil and suffering, and if he’s all-powerful, presumably he’d be able to. The attempt to address this problem is called theodicy.
reviews
52. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
John Shand What is Philosophy For? by Mary Midgley
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
53. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
Kieran Brayford Philosophy in a Technological World by James Tartaglia
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
54. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
Joshua Schrier The Promise of Artificial Intelligence by Brian Cantwell Smith
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
55. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
Brian McCusker Film: Casablanca
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
regulars
56. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
Seán Moran Street Philosopher: Bicycling in Brussels
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
A bicycle, a cartoon character, and beer: this could only be Belgium. And so it is. We are in the land of champion cyclist Eddie Merckx, of Hergé’s Adventures of Tintin, and of twenty-one different types of beer in every bar. To complete the picture, all my photograph needs is an elegant Brussels eurocrat holding a box of Belgian chocolates in one hand and a René Magritte painting in the other, a Hercule Poirot story poking out of her Delvaux handbag. But these are stereotypes. Belgian culture is much richer and more varied than this.
57. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
Raymond Tallis Tallis in Wonderland: Laws of Nature
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
A little while back I touched on the ‘laws of nature’ in the course of a defence of free will (‘The Mystery of Freedom’, Issue 140). I argued that if we were entirely subject to such laws, then neither the experimental science by which they were discovered nor our capacity to exploit them through technology would be possible. Our undeniable ability to manipulate states of matter inside scientific laboratories in pursuit of knowledge of its general properties, and to apply that knowledge outside of the laboratories in support of our agency, are perhaps the most striking expressions of the way in which we humans transcend the material world. But ‘the laws of nature’ (socalled) deserve more attention than I gave them in that piece on free will.
fun, poetry & fiction
58. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
Luís Cordeiro-Rodrigues, Ricardo Tavares The War with the Insectoids
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
regulars
59. Philosophy Now: Volume > 144
Terence Green Philosophical Haiku: Albert Camus
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
editorial & news
60. Philosophy Now: Volume > 143
Rick Lewis Editorial
view |  rights & permissions | cited by