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Displaying: 41-50 of 1351 documents


book reviews
41. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1/2
Kevin Thompson Ardis B. Collins. Hegel's Phenomenology: The Dialectical Justification of Philosophy's First Principles
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42. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1/2
David Kolb Klaus Vieweg. Das Denken der Freiheit: Hegels Grundlinien der Philosophie des Rechts
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43. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1/2
Gregory M. Collins Lisa Herzog. Inventing the Market: Smith, Hegel, & Political Theory
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44. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1/2
Thomas Klikauer Bruce Gilbert. The Vitality of Contradiction: Hegel, Politics, and the Dialectics of Liberal-Capitalism
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45. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1/2
Robert E. Wood Robert B. Pippin. After the Beautiful: Hegel and the Philosophy of Pictorial Modernism
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46. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1/2
New Books
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47. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1/2
Recent Dissertations
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48. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 45 > Issue: 1/2
Jeffrey Reid Comets and Moons: The For-another in Hegel's Philosophy of Nature
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This paper examines the Hegelian moment of the for-another in its negative relation to the other moment of particularity: the for-itself. I identify the dissolving, fluidifying action of the for-another by examining figures within the Philosophy of Nature, particularly comets and moons, but also Hegel’s physics of light and sound. The dissolution of the lunar for-itself at the hands of the cometary for-another illustrates how the dynamic relation between the two moments of particularity participates in the presentation of essence, within the Hegelian syllogism, i.e. as mediating between the universal and the singular. The dynamic action of cometary negativity occurs throughout the Philosophy of Nature and therefore should be pivotal to how the work is read.
49. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 45 > Issue: 1/2
Jon Stewart Hegel, Creuzer, and the Rise of Orientalism
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Commentators generally neglect Hegel’s analyses of the religions of Asia, presumably for fear of being charged with Eurocentrism, racism or colonialism. Hegel’s engagement with these religions, however, occurs during the time when the birth of fields such as Egyptology and Indology gave rise to increased scholarly interest in Asia. Hegel supported the work of Georg Friedrich Creuzer, whose book on symbolism showed the debt that the Greek and Roman religions owed to Egypt, Persia and India. Creuzer’s methodology inspired Hegel, and his support of Creuzer is evidence that Hegel was not the political and social reactionary that many scholars have taken him to be.
book discussion: challenging the kantian frame
50. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 45 > Issue: 1/2
Challenging the Kantian Frame
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