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Journal of Philosophical Research

Philosophy as Inquiry and Way of Life

Volume 40, Issue Supplement, 2015
Selected Papers from the XXIII World Congress of Philosophy

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  • Issue: Supplement

Displaying: 41-47 of 47 documents


philosophy in modern and contemporary greece
41. Journal of Philosophical Research: Volume > 40 > Issue: Supplement
Evangelos Moutsopoulos Être et Vérité: Selon Pétros Braïlas-Arménis
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Le dualisme de Braïlas (1812–1884) qui fut l’unique partisan de Victor Cousin (1792–1867) à avoir, après lui, constitué un système philosophique complet, est un dualisme modéré, du fait qu’en premier lieu, entre la matière et l’esprit, tout un groupe d’activités de la conscience humaine y est censé s’interpoler; qu’en deuxième lieu, le dogmatisme rationaliste braïlien est fondé sur une correspondance rigoureuse entre l’ordre universel et l’ordre rationnel, qui n’est guère dérangé que par l’intuition d’un ordre supérieur et plus parfait, conçu et reproduit par l’imagination, grâce à des processus créationnels; et qu’en troisième lieu, la philosophie braïlienne, quant à ses caractères dominants, s’avère, surtout du point de vue épistémologique, non pas une application servile, mais, par contre, une considération critique des thèses de l’éclectisme cousinien.
42. Journal of Philosophical Research: Volume > 40 > Issue: Supplement
Konstantinos Petsios Continuities and Discontinuities between Neo-Hellenic and European Philosophy
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lectures
43. Journal of Philosophical Research: Volume > 40 > Issue: Supplement
Kah Kyung Cho Subject-Alienation as the Basis of Eco-Ethical World-View
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44. Journal of Philosophical Research: Volume > 40 > Issue: Supplement
Umberto Eco Some Remarks on a New Realism
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45. Journal of Philosophical Research: Volume > 40 > Issue: Supplement
Jürgen Habermas Plea For a Constitutionalization of International Law
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For the process of extending democracy and the rule of law beyond national borders, German public lawyers have developed the concept of a “constitutionalisation of international law.” Let me first explain this concept (I) and then, in a second part, use some aspects of the present European crisis as an example for identifying one major obstacle on the road that eventually may lead us to a political constitution for a multicultural world society without a world government (II).
46. Journal of Philosophical Research: Volume > 40 > Issue: Supplement
Peter Kemp The Struggle over Kierkegaard
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After having presented some key concepts in Kierkegaard’s works this paper focuses on how they have been interpreted and created the ground for various disputes about the use and understanding of Kierkegaard. It first presents some aspects of the debate in Denmark about Kierkegaard and then discusses the difference between two overall interpretations of Kierkegaard’s works by two non-Danish Kierkegaard scholars: Henri-Bernard Vergote and Mark C Taylor. This difference raises the question about the relationship between Kierkegaard and Hegel and thereby about the relationship between poetics and politics.
47. Journal of Philosophical Research: Volume > 40 > Issue: Supplement
Wenchao Li Trading With Light: G. W. Leibniz’s Interest In China and His Project of Asia-European Knowledge Exchange
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Leibniz was interested in China throughout his life, and he admired its culture. Originally, his interests revolved around Chinese characters, but widened when meeting the Jesuit China missionary P. Grimaldi in Rome 1689. From that time on, Leibniz pursued the project of a knowledge exchange between both sides of the world. He was convinced that Europe and China were on the same cultural level, while diverging over advances in distinct fields. In his view, Europe was more advanced in theoretical areas, such as logic, mathematics, geometry, physics, mathematical astronomy, and theory of natural religion, while China was superior in empirical disciplines, such as in observational astronomy, medicine, historiography, and moral philosophy, which he understood as natural (i.e. rational) theology. This project of knowledge exchange presupposed the recognition of Chinese culture. In this sense, Leibniz strongly supported the Jesuit position, according to which the rites of ancestral worship and reverence of Confucius are riti politici rather than literal expressions of religious faith. Leibniz’s main objection to the Pope’s negative assessment of Chinese rites was that one cannot settle the so-called Rites Controversy as long as one fails to interpret adequately Chinese culture and Confucian thought in particular.