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Displaying: 41-50 of 189 documents


41. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 16
Kelly Oliver Deconstructing “Grown versus Made”: A Derridean Perspective on Cloning
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In this essay, I consider what happens to debates over genetic enhancement when we “deconstruct” the opposition between “grown and made” and the notion of freedom of choice that comes with it. Along with the binary grown and made comes other such oppositions at the center of these debates: chance and choice, accident and deliberation, nature and culture. By deconstructing the oppositions between grown versus made (chance versus choice, or accident versus deliberate), and free versus determined, alternative routes through these bioethical thickets start to emerge.
42. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 16
Darrell Arnold Hegel and Ecologically Oriented System Theory
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Building on the views of Kant and early nineteenth century life scientists, Hegel develops a view of systems that is a clear precursor to the developments in Ludwig von Bertalanffy’s general system theory, as well as the thinking of the ecologically minded system thinkers that built upon the foundation Bertalanffy laid. Hegel describes systems as organic wholes in which the parts respectively serve as means and ends. Further, in the Encyclopedia version of the logic Hegel notes that such systems are comprised of three processes: gestalt, the process of assimilation, and regeneration. In Hegel’s texts, he describes both natural and social systems as organic wholes with such systematic processes. In this paper, these processes and systems are described and it is argued that Hegel quite consistently applies views developed in the logic when describing systems. The paper shows how this parallels later developments in systems theory and goes on to show some distinctions between Hegel’s view of systems and that of later ecologically minded system thinkers.
43. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 16
Robert JC Young Interventions: Postcolonial, Agency and Resistance
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book reviews
44. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 16
Tammy Lynn Castelein On Foucault’s Last Philosophical Testament
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45. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 16
Dr. Shiva Rijal Absurd, Parables and Double-Reed Flute
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46. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 16
Dr. Vernon W. Cisney Toward a Deleuzian Ethics: Value without Transcendence
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47. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 16
Notice to Contribution
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48. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 16
Contributors
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editorial
49. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 15
Yubraj Aryal Affective Politics: A Sovereign Way of Cultivating and “Caring of the Self”
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50. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 6 > Issue: 15
Adolfo C. Amaya Regimes of Cannibality: A Peripheral Perspective on War, Colonization and Culture
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The present article aims at postulating cannibalism as a fundamental axis for the analysis of the processes of subjectivation of Spanish America since the 15th century. The hypothesis is that this process has gone through three stages, which allow for the delimitation of the differences of what I shall refer to, for now, as regimes of cannibalism understood as subjectivation processes:(i) Anthropophagic or of ritual war.(ii) Mimetic or of colonial incorporation(iii) Iconic or of mediatic absorption, at a global level.In order to construct the regimes of cannibalism as a concept I have chosen to use two perspectives: the one which speaks of the ritual experimentation of anthropophagy from the inside and the one which moves through the variants of that double desire for the other’s desire that makes every process of colonization possible; in the known forms of territorial annexation, incorporation (productive, spiritual, institutional) and absorption by the global system of mediatization.