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Displaying: 41-60 of 236 documents


ethics
41. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 24
Naomi Zack Starting from Injustice: Justice, Applicative Justice, and Injustice Theory
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Political philosophers have traditionally focused on justice and regarded equality as an ideal despite its lack of factual support; normative universal human equality is a new, twentieth-century regulative moral construct. The theoretical focus on justice overlooks what most people care about in reality—injustice. In modern democratic society, formal or legal equality now co-exists with real inequality. One reason is that justice is not applied to all groups in society and applicative justice––applying justice to those who don’t now receive it––is a remedy. But injustice theory also includes other forms of injustice such as legal, humanitarian, and injustice without blame or responsibility.
in memory of hilary putnam
42. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 24
Martin Bernstein Introduction
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43. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 24
Yemima Ben-Menahem Hilary Putnam: Philosophy with a Human Face
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44. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 24
Juliet Floyd Positive Pragmatic Pluralism
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45. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 24
Geoffrey Hellman Hilary Putnam’s Contributions to Mathematics, Logic, and the Philosophy Thereof
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46. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 24
Gary Ebbs Putnam on Methods of Inquiry
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47. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 24
Paul Franks Hilary Putnam: A Life of Wonder
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48. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 24
David Macarthur Hilary Putnam: Quantum Philosopher
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49. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 23
Garrett Lam Editor's Introduction
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ethics
50. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 23
Derek Parfit Personal and Omnipersonal Duties
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This paper’s main aim is to discuss the relations between our duties and moral aims at different times, and between different people’s moral aims and duties. The paper is unfinished because it was written as part of an intended chapter in the third volume of my book On What Matters, and I later decided to drop this chapter. That is why this paper asks some questions which it doesn’t answer. But though this paper does not end with some general conclusions, it defends some particular conclusions.
lecture
51. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 23
John R. Searle The Ontology of Human Civilization
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The basic elements in the ontology of human civilization are status functions. Those are functions that can be performed not in virtue of physical structure alone but only in virtue of collective acceptance by the community of a certain status. Money, property, government and marriage are all examples of status functions. Status functions are all created by repeated applications of the same logical operation, in a preliminary formulation: X counts as Y in context C.On examination it emerges that all status functions are created by a certain kind of representation that has a logical form of a speech act that I call a “Status Function Declaration.” These are explained.This lecture was delivered without notes and the current publication is very informal. I hope the reader will forgive the informality.
aesthetics
52. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 23
Richard Moran Stanley Cavell on Recognition, Betrayal, and the Photographic Field of Expression
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The ideas of expression and expressiveness have been central to Stanley Cavell’s writing from the beginning, joining themes from his more strictly philosophical writing to the role of human expression as projected in cinema. This paper explores a thread running through several different parts of his writing, relating claims he makes about the photographic medium of film and its implications for the question of expression and expressivity in film There is an invocation of notions of necessity and control in the context of cinema that should be understood in the context of related ideas in his writings on Wittgenstein and others. The paper pursues some thoughts about the power of the camera, the themes of activity and passivity in expression, and the human face as the privileged field of such activity and passivity.
lecture
53. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 23
Aaron James On the Philosophical Interest and Surprising Significance of the Asshole
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The term “asshole” might be of interest to philosophers for several reasons. It displays the power of philosophy to expose the implicit structure of ordinary thought. It suggests why we should not be able to answer certain skeptics on their own terms. It corroborates the idea of an “internal” connection between moral judgment and motivation. And it raises doubts about expressivism where it has the best chance of being true.
continental philosophy
54. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 23
Taylor Carman Gabriel's Metaphysics of Sense
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interview
55. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 23
Christopher Peacocke On Concepts, Art, and Academia
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56. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 22
Garrett Lam Note from the Editor
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paradoxes
57. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 22
Terry Horgan Newcomb's Problem Revisited
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free will
58. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 22
Peter van Inwagen Some Thoughts on An Essay on Free Will
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In this essay I record some thoughts about my book An Essay on Free Will, its reception, and the way analytical philosophers have thought about the free-will problem since its publication 30 years ago. I do not summarize the book, nor am I concerned to defend its arguments—or at least not in any very systematic way. Instead I present some thoughts on three topics: (1) The question ‘If I were to revise the book today, if I were to produce a second edition, what changes would I make?’; (2) Aspects of the book I should like to call to the attention of readers (aspects that, in my view, readers of An Essay on Free Will, have been insufficiently attentive to); and (3) The course of the discussion of the problem of free will subsequent to the publication of the book.
political philosophy
59. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 22
Todd May From Subjectified to Subject: Power and the Possibility of a Democratic Politics
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epistemology
60. The Harvard Review of Philosophy: Volume > 22
Eric Mandelbaum, Jake Quilty-Dunn Believing without Reason: or: Why Liberals Shouldn’t Watch Fox News
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