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Displaying: 41-60 of 1692 documents


reviews
41. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 36 > Issue: 1
Rebecca Stangl The Character Gap: How Good Are We?, by Christian B. Miller
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42. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 36 > Issue: 1
Kyla Ebels-Duggan God’s Own Ethics: Norms of Divine Agency and the Argument from Evil, by Mark C. Murphy
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43. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 36 > Issue: 1
Richard Kim Exemplarist Moral Theory, by Linda Trinkaus Zagzebski
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articles
44. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 35 > Issue: 4
Dawn Eschenauer Chow The Passibility of God: A Plea for Analogy
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The traditional doctrine that God is impassible (here, invulnerable to suffering) is subject to the objection that it is incompatible with belief that God is loving and compassionate. However, the doctrine that God is passible has grave difficulties as well. I argue that Christian believers should take an analogical approach, by believing that God does something relevantly similar to loving us in a way that involves vulnerability to suffering, and thus conceiving of God as loving us in that way, while simultaneously believing that God is in fact impassible. I conclude with answers to several likely objections.
45. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 35 > Issue: 4
Dean Zimmerman Ever Better Situations and the Failure of Expression Principles
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William Rowe argues that if an omnipotent, omniscient being were faced with an infinite hierarchy of better and better worlds to create, that being could not also be unsurpassably morally excellent. His argument assumes that, at least in ideal circumstances, degree of moral goodness must be perfectly expressed in the degree of goodness of the outcomes chosen. Reflection upon the application of analogous expression principles for certainty and desire shows that such principles can be expected to fail for anyone capable of facing an infinite range of options.
46. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 35 > Issue: 4
Therese Scarpelli Cory Embodied vs. Non-Embodied Modes of Knowing in Aquinas: Different Universals, Different Intelligible Species, Different Intellects
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What does it mean to be an embodied thinker of abstract concepts? Does embodiment shape the character and quality of our understanding of universals such as “dog” and “beauty,” and would a non-embodied mind understand such concepts differently? I examine these questions through the lens of Thomas Aquinas’s remarks on the differences between embodied (human) intellects and non-embodied (angelic) intellects. In Aquinas, I argue, the difference between embodied and non-embodied intellection of extramental realities is rooted in the fact that embodied and non-embodied intellects grasp different kinds of universals by means of different kinds of intelligible species (intellectual likenesses), which elicit in them different “modes” of understanding. By spelling out what exactly it means to be an embodied knower, on Aquinas’s account, I argue, we can also shed new light on his mysterious claim that the embodied intellect “turns to phantasms”—the imagination’s likenesses of individuals—in its acts of understanding.
47. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 35 > Issue: 4
Andrew Brenner Theism and Explanationist Defenses of Moral Realism
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Some moral realists have defended moral realism on the basis of the purported fact that moral facts figure as components in some good explanations of non-moral phenomena. In this paper I explore the relationship between theism and this sort of explanationist defense of moral realism. Theistic explanations often make reference to moral facts, and do so in a manner which is ineliminable in an important respect—remove the moral facts from those explanations, and they suffer as a result. In this respect theistic moral explanations seem to differ from the sorts of moral explanations typically offered by moral explanationists.
48. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 35 > Issue: 4
J. L. Schellenberg A New Logical Problem of Evil Revisited
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In this article I state concisely the central features of a new logical problem of evil developed elsewhere and take account of a response to this problem recently published in this journal by Jerome Gellman. I also reflect briefly on how theology can play a role in such philosophical discussions.
49. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 35 > Issue: 4
James R. Beebe Brower and Saenz on Divine Truthmaker Simplicity
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Jeffrey Brower has recently articulated a way to make sense of the doctrine of divine simplicity using resources from contemporary truthmaker theory. Noël Saenz has advanced two objections to Brower’s account, arguing that it violates constraints on adequate metaphysical explanations at various points. I argue that Saenz’s objections fail to show that Brower’s account is explanatorily inadequate.
book reviews
50. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 35 > Issue: 4
Bryan Cross Roman but Not Catholic: What Remains at Stake 500 Years after the Reformation, by Kenneth J. Collins and Jerry L. Walls
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51. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 35 > Issue: 4
Kevin Vallier Debating Religious Liberty and Discrimination, by John Corvino, Ryan T. Anderson, and Sherif Girgis
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52. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 35 > Issue: 4
Alicia Finch Our Fate: Essays on God and Free Will, by John Martin Fischer
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53. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 35 > Issue: 4
Stewart Goetz God and the Meanings of Life: What God Could and Couldn’t Do to Make Our Lives More Meaningful, by T. J. Mawson
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54. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 35 > Issue: 4
Eleanor Helms Kierkegaard’s God and the Good Life, edited by Stephen Minister, J. Aaron Simmons, and Michael Strawser
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articles
55. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 35 > Issue: 3
Kyla Ebels-Duggan Love (of God) as a Middle Way between Dogmatism and Hyper-Rationalism in Ethics
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In the Groundwork Kant asserts that the fundamental moral principle must be a principle of autonomy. He dismisses theistic principles, along with all other competitors to his Categorical Imperative, claiming that they are heteronomous. I argue that the best case for this Kantian conclusion conflates our access to the reasons for our commitments with an ability to state these reasons such that they could figure in an argument. This conflation, in turn, results from a certain Kantian conception of inclination, and its role in our moral psychology. These are views that we ought to reject. Having done so, we will see that a theistic ethics based on desire or love for God need not face a distinctive problem of heteronomy.
56. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 35 > Issue: 3
Joshua Cockayne, David Efird Common Worship
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People of faith, particularly in the Judeo-Christian tradition, worship corporately at least as often, if not more so, than they do individually. Why do they do this? There are, of course, many reasons, some having to do with personal preference and others having to do with the theology of worship. But, in this paper, we explore one reason, a philosophical reason, which, despite recent work on the philosophy of liturgy, has gone underappreciated. In particular, we argue that corporate worship enables a person to come to know God better than they would otherwise know him in individual worship.
57. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 35 > Issue: 3
Anthony Bolos A Functionalist Account of Human Uniqueness
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I challenge the assumption that human uniqueness of the sort motivated by the doctrine of the imago Dei is incompatible with contemporary views in evolutionary biology. I first develop a functionalist account of the image of God and then argue that image bearing is a contingently imposed function. Humans, chosen by God to bear his image, are unique in that they alone possess an ideal range of image bearing capacities. This ideal range makes humans well-suited for the role of image bearing.
58. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 35 > Issue: 3
Perry Hendricks How To Be a Skeptical Theist and a Commonsense Epistemologist
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Trent Dougherty has argued that commonsense epistemology and skeptical theism are incompatible. In this paper, I explicate Dougherty’s argument, and show that (at least) one popular form of skeptical theism is compatible with commonsense epistemology.
59. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 35 > Issue: 3
William Hasker Can a Latin Trinity Be Social? A Response to Scott M. Williams
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Scott Williams’s Latin Social model of the Trinity holds that the trinitarian persons have between them a single set of divine mental powers and a single set of divine mental acts. He claims, nevertheless, that on his view the persons are able to use indexical pronouns such as “I.” This claim is examined and is found to be mistaken.
60. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 35 > Issue: 3
Merold Westphal Reply to Eleanor Helms on Faith Versus Reason in Kierkegaard
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Two reasons are given for speaking of “reason” even where Kierkegaard’s pseudonym, Climacus, speaks of “understanding.” First, we are dealing with a significant contribution to a centuries-old discussion of an issue that goes by the name of “faith and reason.” Second, whereas Kant and Hegel sharply distinguish mere understanding from reason, no such distinction is at work in Kierkegaard’s text. At issue is the quite different distinction of unaided human reason and divine revelation. It is not just any notion of reason that is the target of Kierkegaard’s critique, but an autonomous reason, independent of revelation, that claims hegemony over biblical faith in both its popular and academic forms. This hegemony expresses itself in both outright rejection of and radical reinterpretation of elements of biblical faith.