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Displaying: 41-50 of 1834 documents


41. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 2
Thomas Heyd, Bertrand Guillaume, The Natural Contract in the Anthropocene
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In view of humanity’s vast and accelerating environmental impacts on the planet in its more recent past it has been proposed to think of this period as a new geologic epoch called “the Anthropocene.” While some suppose that our present situation justifies large-scale, corrective interventions, Michel Serres has proposed “a contract with nature,” which, to the contrary, calls for a reduction in our interventions on the planet. Although there are difficulties in engaging in a contract with something lacking autonomous agency, rationality, and sentience, the idea of a natural contract does make sense. It offers a richly suggestive reconception of socio-political relationships between human society and the natural world, and has enough precedents to serve as a source of inspiration and guidance for the urgently needed transformation of our approach to the natural environment.
book reviews
42. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 2
Roger S. Gottlieb, Anne Frank’s Tree: Nature’s Confrontation with Technology, Domination, and the Holocaust
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43. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 2
Lauren Hartzell-Nichols, Philosophy and the Precautionary Principle: Science, Evidence, and Environmental Policy
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44. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 2
Ned Hettinger, The Sublime in Modern Philosophy: Aesthetics, Ethics, and Nature
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45. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 2
Eric Katz, Naturalness: Is the “Natural” Preferable to the “Artificial”?
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46. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 2
Donald A. Brown, Nature’s Trust: An Environmental Law for A New Ecological Age
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47. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 2
Robert Streiffer, Personhood, Ethics, and Animal Cognition: Situating Animals in Hare’s Two-Level Utilitarianism
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48. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 2
Amy Linch, Engaging Nature: Environmentalism and the Political Theory Canon
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49. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 1
News And Notes
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features
50. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 38 > Issue: 1
Mei-Hsiang Lin, Traditional Chinese Confucianism and Taoism and Current Environmental Education
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In an era in which a conflicting relationship exists between humans and nature, ways of solv­ing environmental problems need to be introduced into people’s thinking about what to do, what lifestyle we should accept, and what kind of people we should become to support our environmental protection work using better justifications. Traditional Chinese Confucianism and Taoism can exert a profound ideological, philosophical, and spiritual influence on how people judge the meaning and value of their lives. Regarding how humans face the natural environment and how they perceive the meaning and value of human lives, Chinese Con­fucianists and Taoists who possess profound wisdom and great benevolence have provided unique philosophical views. The philosophical views and thinking of Chinese Confucianism and Taoism provide links to the environmental crises that humans encounter today.