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Displaying: 41-60 of 66 documents


v. polish antinomies—the endless controversies
41. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 14 > Issue: 5/6
Stanisław Nałęcz-Komornicki, Agata Trzcińska History and Historiography of the Warsaw Uprising
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A progress report on studies around the Warsaw Uprising, an issue which mainly for political reasons was a taboo for the past four decades.The few studies that did come out in that time were either incomplete owing to the lack of reliable source material, or presented a false, distorted picture of the events upon insistence by the state authorities, who had no interest in revealing the truth about the insurgency.Even now, democracy permitting access to many once secret files and documents, research into the events of 1944 is far from satisfying. In this knowledge, the author appeals for an indepth investigation of all reliable sources in a quest for the truth about the Warsaw Uprising.
42. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 14 > Issue: 5/6
Walter Jajko The Warsaw Rising from the Contemporary American Perspective
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Sixty years is a sufficient lapse of time to examine dispassionately the Warsaw Rising of 1944. The Rising is one of the several exceptionally destructive tragedies that indelibly stamp Poland’s struggle for survival from 1772 to 1989. The Warsaw Rising is also a major milestone in European and World History, having affected what became the superpower balance of power. During World War II, Anglo-American diplomacy vis-à-vis Poland was an inept combination of pretense, self-delusion, and deceit, dishonesty added to betrayal. The US conspired in consigning half of Europe to captivity. As a result, Russia, not the US, won the war in Europe. The destruction of the Warsaw Rising by Germany, facilitated by Russia, had long term, evil consequences. The destruction of Poland’s political and intellectual class finished the Underground State as an existing alternative, democratic government. The destruction of the Home Army prevented armed opposition to Sovietization. The defeat of the Rising was the primary, initiatory, and necessary antecedent to the Sovietization of Eastern Europe. The capture of Poland ensured the half-century-long impoverishment of half of historic Europe, for whose social, economic, and demographic consequences we will be paying for years to come. The capture also ensured the moral and ethical impoverishment of half of Europe, which will take generations to set right.
43. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 14 > Issue: 5/6
Zbigniew Klejn Triad
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The idealistic, political and military causes and effects of the Warsaw Uprising are discussed by the author against a historical background and on the basis of his own experience as a participant in the fighting. Portrayed are its instigators’ and participants’ reasoning and ambitions as well as the revolt’s ultimate political and military defeat, whose tragic aftermath evoked heated discussions and mutual accusations among Poles. Klejn also dwells on the deep meaning of the uprising, whose ideals gradually led to the 1989 changes in Poland. In his opinion, the tragic fate of Warsaw and its inhabitants was decided, but the consequences and conclusions of this longest uprising of the Second World War have become values that shaped the modern Polish nation and that constitute its contribution for the newly created European order.
the john w. kluge prize for leszek kołakowski
44. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3/4
The Award of the First John W. Kluge Prize for Lifetime Achievement in the Human Sciences to Leszek Kołakowski
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45. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3/4
Library of Congress Announces Winner of First John W. Kluge Prize for Lifetime Achievement in the Humanities and Social Sciences
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46. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3/4
Leszek Kołakowski What the Past Is For
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leszek kołakowski—doctor honoris causa of wrocław university
47. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3/4
Zdzisław Latajka Opening Address
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48. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3/4
Bernard Albin Professor Leszek Kołakowski’s Curriculum Vitae
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49. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3/4
Karol Bal Laudation
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50. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3/4
Aleksander Kwaśniewski President of the Republic of Poland
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51. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3/4
Karol Toeplitz Review of the Achievements of Leszek Kołakowski
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52. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3/4
Ryszard Panasiuk Review of the Achievements of Leszek Kołakowski
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53. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3/4
Leszek Kołakowski Acceptance Speech
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54. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3/4
Leszek Kołakowski Worst Memories—Again
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55. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3/4
Adam Daniel Rotfeld Once Again on the Worst Issues
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56. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3/4
Janusz Kuczyński, Maciej Bańkowski The Editor’s Afterword: The Universalism Imperative vs. Horror Metaphysicus and Horror Politicus
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within the realms of the universal: defining and co-creating the world’s status
57. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3/4
Immanuel Wallerstein The Rising Strength of the World Social Forum
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58. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3/4
Jadwiga Staniszkis, Philip Earl Steele The Rise and Demise of the Metaphysics of the State
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Two streams of political thought will be presented: metaphysics of State (that started in the 14th century with the Ockhamian nominalism and ended with the “political theology” of Carl Schmidt and Weberian rationalization and “dictatorship of form”) and metaphysics of Power (from Nietzsche and Kierkegaard to Derrida, with power as imposed discontinuity). An impact of globalization concealing both traditions (and leading to de-politization, de-hierarchization and de-ontologization of power) will be analyzed, with the present evolution of European Union as an example. Structural violence (as a case of structural power, characteristic of globalization) will be shown in a post-communist context.
59. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3/4
Lech W. Zacher Globalization: Rationalities and Irrationalities
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metaphilosophy of civilizations
60. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3/4
Andrew Targowski From Global to Universal Civilization
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