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Displaying: 41-50 of 1562 documents


book reviews
41. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 92 > Issue: 4
Virgil Martin Nemoianu Wagering on an Ironic God: Pascal on Faith and Philosophy. By Thomas S. Hibbs
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42. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 92 > Issue: 4
Christopher Stephen Lutz Ethics in the Conflicts of Modernity: An Essay on Desire, Practical Reasoning, and Narrative. By Alasdair MacIntyre
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43. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 92 > Issue: 4
Michael J. Dodds, OP Divine Causality and Human Free Choice: Domingo Banez, Physical Premotion and the Controversy De Auxiliis Revisited. By Robert Joseph Matava
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44. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 92 > Issue: 4
Michael Krom Justice as A Virtue: A Thomistic Perspective. By Jean Porter
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45. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 92 > Issue: 4
Geoffrey Karabin Gabriel Marcel and American Philosophy: The Religious Dimension of Experience. By David Rodick
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46. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 92 > Issue: 4
Contents of Volume 92 (2018)
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articles
47. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 92 > Issue: 3
Trent Dougherty Introduction: Special Issue on Religious Epistemology
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48. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 92 > Issue: 3
Katherine Dormandy Evidence-Seeking as an Expression of Faith
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Faith is often regarded as having a fraught relationship with evidence. Lara Buchak even argues that it entails foregoing evidence, at least when this evidence would influence your decision to act on the proposition in which you have faith. I present a counterexample inspired by the book of Job, in which seeking evidence for the sake of deciding whether to worship God is not only compatible with faith, but is in fact an expression of great faith. One might still think that foregoing evidence may make faith more praiseworthy than otherwise; but I argue against this claim too, once more drawing on Job. A faith that expresses itself by a search for evidence can be more praiseworthy than a faith that sits passively in the face of epistemic adversity.
49. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 92 > Issue: 3
Amir Saemi The Morally Difficult Notion of Heaven: A Critique of the Faith-Based Ethics of Avicenna and Aquinas
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I will argue that Avicenna’s and Aquinas’s faith-based virtue ethics are crucially different from Aristotle’s virtue ethics, in that their ethics hinges on the theological notion of heaven, which is constitutively independent of the ethical life of the agent. As a result, their faith-based virtue ethics is objectionable. Moreover, I will also argue that the notion of heaven that Avicenna and Aquinas deploy in their moral philosophy is problematic; for it can rationally permit believers to commit morally horrendous actions. Finally, I will present a Kantian notion of heaven which is immune to the aforementioned moral objection. The Kantian notion of heaven, nevertheless, cannot ground any view of ethics as it is constitutively dependent on the ethical life of the agent.
50. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 92 > Issue: 3
Andrew James Komasinski Faith, Recognition, and Community: Abraham and “Faith-In” in Hegel and Kierkegaard
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This article looks at “faith-in” and what Jonathan Kvanvig calls the “belittler objection” by comparing Hegel and Kierkegaard’s interpretations of Abram (later known as Abraham). I first argue that Hegel’s treatment of Abram in Spirit of Christianity and its Fate is an objection to faith-in. Building on this from additional Hegelian texts, I argue that Hegel’s objection arises from his social command account of morality. I then turn to Johannes de Silentio’s treatments of Abraham in Fear and Trembling and Søren Kierkegaard’s Works of Love to argue that Kierkegaard defends faith-in as part of a moderate divine command account of moral knowledge. Finally, this article concludes that the belittler objection is ultimately an objection to faith-in as a divine command source of moral knowledge or obligation rather than a social command source.