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Displaying: 31-40 of 124 documents


31. Stance: An International Undergraduate Philosophy Journal: Volume > 9
C.J. Oswald Moral Vegetarianism and the Philosophy of Mind
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Most arguments for moral vegetarianism rely on the premise that non-human animals can suffer. In this paper I evaluate problems that arise from Peter Carruthers’ Higher-Order Thought theory of consciousness. I argue that, even if we assume that these problems cannot be overcome, it does not follow that we should not subscribe to moral vegetarianism. I conclude that we should act as if non-human animals have subjective experiences for moral reasons, even if we cannot be certain that they do.
32. Stance: An International Undergraduate Philosophy Journal: Volume > 9
Nicole B. Doolen Purity Balls: Virtue Ethics, Sexuality, and Moral Development
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In this paper, I draw on the principles of Aristotelian ethics, the work of modern virtue ethicists, and previous feminist critiques of purity balls to interrogate the effects of this practice on moral development. I argue that purity balls discourage young women from making autonomous, informed, and virtuously motivated decisions regarding their sexuality. While most critiques of purity balls are rooted in the explicitly patriarchal structure of these events, my analysis emphasizes the negative impact they have on moral agency. I conclude that purity balls are unethical because of the detrimental effects they have on the becoming of virtuous agents.
33. Stance: An International Undergraduate Philosophy Journal: Volume > 9
Linda Martín Alcoff Feminism, Speaking for Others, and the Role of the Philosopher: An Interview with Linda Martín Alcoff
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34. Stance: An International Undergraduate Philosophy Journal: Volume > 9
Author Biographies
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35. Stance: An International Undergraduate Philosophy Journal: Volume > 8
Camilla Cannon The Contemporary American Child as a Docile Consumptive Body
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In this paper, I argue that the contemporary relationship between children and advertising can be seen as illustrative of Foucault’s theory of disciplinary power and docile body production. I contend that, within the context of a consumption-based economy, an individual’s prime utility is her rate of personal consumption. Therefore, the subjection of children to ubiquitous advertising can be seen as the discipline through which the utility of personal consumption is maximized.
36. Stance: An International Undergraduate Philosophy Journal: Volume > 8
Ian Ferguson Nietzsche and the Prince
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The main character of Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s novel The Idiot is a devout Orthodox Christian named Prince Myshkin. Friedrich Nietzsche, who is intensely critical of Christianity, and Myshkin share the same views on shame and pity despite their apparent ideological differences. They condemn the damaging effects of shame and praise the redeeming quality of pity for people who are put to shame. Nietzsche and Myshkin criticize the moral aspect of Christianity, but Nietzsche generalizes it for all of Christianity and Myshkin limits it to the Catholic Church. In the end, they both advocate a philosophy of love for humanity.
37. Stance: An International Undergraduate Philosophy Journal: Volume > 8
Eric Badovinatz There Are No Genuine Disagreements about Funniness
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I argue that there are no genuine disagreements about whether something is funny. My argument rests largely on the premise that something is funny only if someone experiences it as funny. The bulk of this paper is spent supporting this premise, primarily through an analysis of the meaning of “funniness.” The rest of the paper is spent demonstrating how my conclusion follows from this premise.
38. Stance: An International Undergraduate Philosophy Journal: Volume > 8
Brandon Ferrick Defending a Benefit-Based Approach to Compensation for Necessary Losses
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This paper examines cases when compensation follows from necessary actions that cause harm. I posit that we can determine when compensation is due in instances of necessity by referring to the distribution of benefits and losses that result from the action.
39. Stance: An International Undergraduate Philosophy Journal: Volume > 8
Katie Lane Kirkland Concreteness and Contraception: Beauvoir’s Second Sex and the Affordable Care Act
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In this paper, I analyze Simone de Beauvoir’s goals for women expressed in The Second Sex and compare these goals to the opportunities created by the Affordable Care Act’s contraceptive mandate. Though the contraceptive mandate advances Beauvoir’s goal of concrete equality by supporting economic independence and recognizing women’s sexual freedom, there are social and political limitations to these advancements.
40. Stance: An International Undergraduate Philosophy Journal: Volume > 8
Anson Tullis Duality Unresolved and Darwinian Dilemmas
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By using Sharon Street’s Darwinian Dilemma, Katarzyna de Lazari-Radek and Peter Singer attempt to show that Sidgwick’s duality of practical reason, whereby an agent has equal reason to act in their own interests or act impartially for the benefit of all, is not actually a duality; rather, reasons for action are solely impartial due to the unreliability of intuitions favoring self-interested behavior. I argue that Lazari-Radek and Singer fail to accomplish their goal. I argue that Singer has previously provided an account of impartiality that makes it just as unreliable on the same grounds as self-interested tendencies. Sidgwick’s duality remains unresolved.