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Displaying: 31-40 of 1632 documents


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31. Process Studies: Volume > 46 > Issue: 2
George W. Shields Nature as Sacred Ground: A Metaphysics for Religious Naturalism
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32. Process Studies: Volume > 46 > Issue: 2
John B. Cobb, Jr. God and the History of the Universe
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33. Process Studies: Volume > 46 > Issue: 2
John Maxwell Kerr God Exists but Gawd Does Not
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34. Process Studies: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
Dwayne Schulz The Problem of Identity and Eternal Objects in Whitehead
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This article is an exploration of the problem of identity in Whitehead. Both the Platonic and the nominalistic tendencies in Whitehead are analyzed. His theory of eternal objects is criticized and a process view of identity based on tropes is defended.
35. Process Studies: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
Randy Ramal On Not Seeing What Lies Open to View in Wittgenstein and Whitehead: A Response to Jerry H. Gill and Richard McDonough
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In this article, I discuss two recent accounts of potential philosophical links between Whitehead and Wittgenstein, one by Jerry H. Gill (Process Studies 43.1) and a response to it by Richard McDonough (Process Studies 45.2). I argue that Gill and McDonough fail to do full justice to the views of Whitehead and Wittgenstein on language and the nature of philosophy. I also argue that they miss an obvious link between Whitehead and Wittgenstein that would have made the engagement with their works more productive. Borrowing a metaphor from Wittgenstein, I argue that Gill and McDonough not only fail to see what is open to view regarding the views of Whitehead and Wittgenstein on language and philosophy, but also regarding their agreement on the transcendent nature of values as such.
36. Process Studies: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
George R. Lucas, Jr. On the Trail of Whitehead: Part Two: The Emergence of Whitehead’s Metaphysics, 1925–29
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This is the second installment in a series that reports on the progress of some of the more interesting discoveries emerging from ongoing work on the new and comprehensive critical edition of Whitehead being published by Edinburgh University Press. This installment deals, as the subtitle indicates, with the emergence of Whitehead’s metaphysics from 1925 until 1929. The first installment appeared in Process Studies 45.1.
37. Process Studies: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
Messay Kebede Being and Nothingness versus Bergson’s Striving Being
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Bergson imputes the generation of false problems in philosophy to the idea of nothingness and negative concepts. Yet, all his books are fraught with oppositional thinking, such as the oppositions between space and time, quantity and quality, life and matter. Understandably, this apparent discrepancy has led a philosopher like Merleau-Ponty to speak of inconsistency, while Jankélévitch and others counter the charge of inconsistency by arguing that Bergsonism embraces operational opposition as opposed to substantial opposition. This article disagrees with both interpretations and proposes a solution based on the need to distinguish between the level of intuitive vision of the unity of nature and the level of representative analysis whose defining feature is that it operates by means of opposing concepts. The progression from representation to intuition transcends opposition and unites life and matter in the vision of a self-surpassing effort or élan.
38. Process Studies: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
Amene Mir Whitehead and Efficient Causation: The Physical as Conceptual Realization
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Whitehead’s understanding of efficient causation is developed in reaction against the prevailing worldview of his scientific and philosophical predecessors’ material abstraction, bodily sensationalism, subject-object bifurcation, and partial subjectivism. Whitehead believed these ideas precluded the development of any satisfactory account of causal relation and connectivity. His response is to offer a forensic account of the nature of subjective experience within which causal efficacy could be accommodated. Yet Whitehead’s position has its own problems. In response, this article argues for a primordial basis to causal connectivity and for understanding physical causation in terms of conceptual realization.
39. Process Studies: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
Thomas M. Dicken Trees: A Panexperiential Exploration
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This article explores the ontological status of trees from a Whiteheadian panexperientialist viewpoint; it also explores how our relationship with trees affects who we are as human beings.
40. Process Studies: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
David E. Roy Can Whitehead’s Philosophy Provide an Adequate Theoretical Foundation for Today’s Neuroscience?
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This article compares research in neuroscience regarding the right and left hemispheres of the brain, particularly in the work of Iain McGilchrist and Robert Ornstein, with Whitehead’s perception in the mode of causal efficacy and in the mode of presentational immediacy, respectively.