Already a subscriber? - Login here
Not yet a subscriber? - Subscribe here

Browse by:



Displaying: 21-40 of 52 documents


articles
21. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 57 > Issue: 2
Jonathan J. Sanford Aristotle on Evil as Privation
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
The notion that evil is not simply a privation but a privation of a due good has roots in Aristotle’s Metaphysics and implications for other areas of his thought. In making this case, I begin with a description of the standard view of Aristotle’s place in the development of the privation theory of evil and contend that the standard view does not do justice to Aristotle’s theory of evil. I then provide an interpretation of a portion of Metaphysics Theta that utilizes recent scholarship on this book of the Metaphysics in an effort to demonstrate that Aristotle thinks of evil in such a manner as to be compatible with what the later tradition describes in terms of evil as the deprivation of a due good. I then consider several of the ways in which Aristotle’s metaphysical theory of evil has impact on other areas of his thought.
22. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 57 > Issue: 2
David M. Holley Confident Religious Faith and Intellectual Virtue
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Religious communities that speak of faith typically affirm the ideal of a highly confident faith. If we understand confidence in terms of the quality of assent to faith-claims, however, it is difficult to reconcile a high degree of confidence with intellectual virtue. As an alternative, I propose to construe confident faith as a kind of trusting perception. The sort of confidence that I envision here makes sense as a religious ideal. In addition it leaves room for the recognition of epistemic risk needed for intellectual humility as well as for the kind of openness to revising the content of faith in the light of relevant evidential considerations that intellectual integrity demands. Furthermore, someone with this type of confidence can find a particular faith compelling, while also acknowledging some faiths that make conflicting claims to be reasonable options.
book reviews
23. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 57 > Issue: 2
John W. Peck, S.J. Evolution, Chance and God: Understanding the Relationship between Evolution and Religion. By Brendan Sweetman
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
24. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 57 > Issue: 2
Clara Sarrocco Arendt’s Judgment: Freedom, Responsibility, Citizenship. By Jonathan Peter Schwartz
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
25. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 57 > Issue: 2
Sam Zeno Conedera, S.J. The Human Rights State: Justice Within and Beyond Sovereign Nations. By Benjamin Gregg
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
26. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 57 > Issue: 2
Raymond L. Dennehy The Myth of Liberalism. By John P. Safranek
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
27. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 57 > Issue: 2
Joseph W. Koterski, S.J. Concepts of Nature: Ancient and Modern. Edited by R. J. Snell and Steven F. McGuire
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
28. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 57 > Issue: 2
Books Received
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
29. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 57 > Issue: 1
About Our Contributors
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
articles
30. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 57 > Issue: 1
Artur Szutta Moral Intuitions, Disagreement, and the Consensus Condition
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
In this paper I focus on Roger Crisp’s objection to moral intuitionism. The objection is that in the face of disagreement, especially between ethical experts (understood here as epistemic peers), the mere fact of one’s having a moral intuition, even after reflection, is insufficient to hold a given moral belief. The core assumption of the objection is the consensus condition (or Sidgwick’s principle) according to which in the face of reasonable disagreement with one’s epistemic peers one should suspend one’s contested view. My goal is a critical analysis of this objection (with special attention paid to the idea of consensus condition). I offer five counter-arguments to show that Crisp’s argumentation is not conclusive. They are as follows: an argument from self-reference, from the doubt about the possibility of voluntarily suspending one’s judgment, from the priority of the first-person evidential basis, from epistemic luck, and from practical consequences of observing the consensus condition.
31. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 57 > Issue: 1
Fernando Martin De Blassi Considerations on the Concept of Audacity (tólma) in Plotinus
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Within the Plotinian corpus the topic of audacity provides a key for explaining the hypostatic constitution of what proceeds from the One and advances towards the formation of the sensitive world. This essay will try to settle some questions about the role of audacity within the corpus of Plotinus. Doing so will allow us to argue for the following position. Even if the generation of a being separate and distinct from the One includes the notion of otherness and therefore of multiplicity, this action—a product of the Intellect’s daring—does not imply dispersion but only the constitution of a living being able to develop by its own strength the richness already contained in its germinal potency.
32. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 57 > Issue: 1
Scott Roniger Speech and Being in Aristotle’s Metaphysics
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
In this paper I argue that Aristotle presents speech (logos) as the dynamic manifestation of the being of things and hence truth. By highlighting the role of speech, I attempt to amplify what it means to discuss being-as-the-true, one of the four senses of being that Aristotle investigates in the Metaphysics. The paper unfolds in three sections. First, I survey some influential reflections on the theme of speech and being in Aristotle. In sections two and three, I consider portions of the Metaphysics that show the intimate connection between speech and being. The first comes from the opening book of the Metaphysics, where Aristotle discusses the manner in which technê is a kind of wisdom. The second passage comes from Metaphysics Book Γ, where Aristotle defends the so-called “principle of non-contradiction.”
33. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 57 > Issue: 1
Michelle Brady Acting for the Public Good: Locke on Freedom and Judgment
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
In the Second Treatise of Government, Locke clearly intends to construct a political order that limits the harm a tyrannical ruler can do, but his account of prerogative also effectively limits the good a ruler can do. If political and paternal power are distinct, then the standard for legitimate rule is not the public good but the good as the public understands it. The significance of this distinction becomes clear when we recognize Locke’s pessimism about our ability to adequately judge the public good. Locke’s reliance on the public’s judgment as the final authority, despite his expectation that we will judge badly, can be explained in practical or pedagogical terms. He further suggests that the limits to a ruler’s power follow from inherent limits on what human beings can know about the good.
34. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 57 > Issue: 1
Keith Lemna Enstatic Phenomenology and the Meaning of Suffering
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
This paper explores the question of the meaning of suffering by comparing the work of Michel Henry with that of Max Scheler. Henry’s “enstatic phenomenology” is proposed as an approach to existential disclosure that deepens our understanding of the paradoxical character of human affect in light of a phenomenology of Christ by delving into the mystery of suffering and following a path of exploration opened up by Max Scheler in his seminal essay “The Meaning of Suffering.” I suggest that our understanding of suffering needs a phenomenology of sacrifice to make possible the integration of enstatic and ecstatic ways of phenomenologically disclosing affect.
35. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 57 > Issue: 1
Tamar Levanon Reid on Leibniz’s Monad and the Conceptual Priority of the Whole
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
In his Essays on the Intellectual Powers of Man Thomas Reid draws an analogy between his notion of the self and Leibniz’s notion of a monad. Reid formulates this analogy in order to highlight what he considers to be the essential feature of the self: its unified and indivisible structure. This paper considers Reid’s analogy in the specific context of the diachronic aspect of substantial unity. Its focus is specifically on the role that the idea of continuity plays in establishing the unity and indivisibility of the entities in question (viz., the self and the monad). As part of the ongoing debate over Leibniz’s mature metaphysics of substance, this paper highlights the positive implication of Reid’s analysis of the self (usually viewed as a critical reaction to Locke and Hume) and its place within the early modern debate over the nature of substantial unity.
book reviews
36. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 57 > Issue: 1
John D. Gilroy What Pragmatism Was. By F. Thomas Burke
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
37. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 57 > Issue: 1
Brendan Sweetman Killing by Remote Control: The Ethics of an Unmanned Military. Edited by Bradley Jay Strawser
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
38. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 57 > Issue: 1
James P. Iovino Retrieving Apologetics. By Glenn B. Siniscalchi
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
39. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 57 > Issue: 1
Heinrich Watzka, S.J. Nature: Its Conceptual Architecture. By Louis Caruana
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
40. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 57 > Issue: 1
Giuseppe Butera Abelard in Four Dimensions: A Twelfth-Century Philosopher in His Context and Ours. By Jon Marenbon
view |  rights & permissions | cited by