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31. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 2
Silvia Carli The Most Complete Activity
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This paper provides an interpretation of Aristotle’s claim that activities (energeiai) such as seeing, which are complete (teleiai) in form, can nevertheless be more or less complete depending on the condition of the faculty and the character of the object on which the faculty acts (Nicomachean Ethics 10.4.1174b14–20). After reviewing and criticizing current interpretations, it argues that activities that are complete in form are more or less complete in that they can attain their end to a lesser or greater degree. The notion of degrees of completeness is then used to show that Aristotle’s seemingly conflicting claims on the possibility of acting virtuously in the Nicomachean Ethics are elements of a unified picture in which actions display different degrees of virtue or excellence.
32. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 2
Edward Ryan Moad Divine Conservation, Concurrence, and Occasionalism
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Occasionalism is the doctrine that relegates all real causal efficacy exclusively to God. This paper will aim to elucidate in some detail the metaphysical considerations that, together with certain common medieval theological axioms, constitute the philosophical steps leading to this doctrine. First, I will explain how the doctrine of divine conservation implies that we should attribute to divine power causal immediacy in every natural event and that it rules out mere conservationism as a model of the causal relation between God and nature. This leaves concurrentism and occasionalism as the only compatible options. Then I will explain the argument that since no coherent conception of divine concurrence is possible, occasionalism emerges as the only model of the causal relation between God and nature compatible with the doctrine of divine conservation.
book reviews
33. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 2
Brian Gregor In Praise of Heteronomy: Making Room for Revelation. By Merold Westphal
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34. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 2
Christopher H. Owen John Senior and the Restoration of Realism. By Francis Bethel, O.S.B.
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35. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 2
Brendan Sweetman Thomas Aquinas’s Summa Contra Gentiles: A Guide and Commentary. By Brian Davies
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36. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 2
Joseph W. Koterski, S.J. "The Crisis of Modernity"; and "The Age of Secularization." Both by Augusto Del Noce. Edited and translated by Carlo Lancellotti
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37. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 2
Books Received
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38. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 1
About Our Contributors
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articles
39. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 1
Yinghua Lu Shame and the Confucian Idea of Yi (Righteousness)
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This paper analyzes the relation between shame and a Confucian notion of yi (righteousness, rightness), especially through discussions from Confucius and Mencius. Section one clarifies Mencius’s position that righteousness is both external and internal. Although this idea includes rules, it is primarily something intended by our innate moral feelings. Section two illustrates the point that if one’s action is not right (yi), the feeling of shame spontaneously arises and motivates a self-correction. This section also clarifies the difference between the idea of shame in Max Scheler and in Confucian thought. Section three compares absolute yi with general li (ritual propriety) as well as the roles that shame and duty play in relation to ren (primarily humane love).
40. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 1
Joseph L. Lombardi, S.J. Possible-Worlds Metaphysics and the Logical Problem of Evil: Concerning Alvin Plantinga’s Solution
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Alvin Plantinga’s solution to J. L. Mackie’s logical problem of evil invokes possible-worlds metaphysics. There are reasons for thinking that the solution is, at least, problematic. Difficulties emerge in the attempts to answer four related questions. (1) Can God’s necessary existence, understood in terms of possible-world metaphysics, make God’s actual existence impossible to explain? (2) Can an omniscient being with knowledge of the contents of every possible world (a being endowed with “middle knowledge”) prove ignorant of the consequences of his creative acts? (3) Can an immoral action performed by an agent suffering from “transworld depravity” also be free in the libertarian sense? (4) Does the possible-worlds interpretation of libertarian freedom generate a vicious infinite regress? Special focus is on the possibility, advanced by Plantinga, that there are possible worlds that even an omnipotent being cannot create. Plantinga’s views are contrasted with those of Thomas Aquinas.