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Displaying: 31-40 of 821 documents


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31. Hume Studies: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Jia Wei Maritime Trade as the Pivot of Foreign Policy in Hume’s History of Great Britain
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This paper examines David Hume’s vision of how maritime trade opened up new strategic prospects and challenges for England in the Stuart age. It shows that his emphasis in the History of England was not simply European, as most Hume scholars have believed, but, more importantly, trans-Atlantic. He maintained that England’s maritime trade in America and the West Indies from the seventeenth century onward tied her fortunes to the opaque and uncertain destiny of imperial politics. This had important implications for the dynamic relationship between Britain and its American colonies as well as for the resulting contest of European powers around the world. This paper shows that maritime trade served as the focal point for Hume in explaining England’s role in the European balance of power. Although some attention has been drawn to this aspect, no systematic study has investigated his Stuart history as an important text for understanding his views on foreign policy. This paper fills the gap by explaining the connections between his views on political economy and foreign policy It shows how he explained the crucial importance of trading interests in the English strategic thinking as well as why the European balance of power was significant for England’s maritime security and national interests.
32. Hume Studies: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Peter Millican Skepticism about Garrett’s Hume: Faculties, Concepts, and Imposed Coherence
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33. Hume Studies: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Don Garrett Millican’s “Abstract,” “Imaginative,” “Reasonable,” and “Sensible” Questions about Hume’s Theory of Cognition
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34. Hume Studies: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Louis E. Loeb Setting the Standard: Don Garrett’s Hume
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35. Hume Studies: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Don Garrett Loeb’s “Standard” Questions about Hume’s Concept of Probable Truth
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book reviews
36. Hume Studies: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Anik Waldow Udo Thiel. The Early Modern Subject: Self-Consciousness and Personal Identity from Descartes to Hume
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37. Hume Studies: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Stephen Buckle Knud Haakonssen, ed. The Cambridge History of Eighteenth-Century Philosophy
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38. Hume Studies: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Index to Volume 40
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39. Hume Studies: Volume > 40 > Issue: 2
Hume Studies Referees, 2014–2015
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articles
40. Hume Studies: Volume > 40 > Issue: 1
Lilli Alanen Personal Identity, Passions, and “The True Idea of the Human Mind”
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This paper explores some strands of the new science of man proposed in Hume’s Treatise, focusing on the role given to the passions in Hume’s account of personal identity. How is the view of the self with regard to the passions examined in Book 2 supposed to complement, as Hume suggests, that with regard to thought and imagination discussed in Book 1 (T 1.4.6.19; SBN 261)? How should the nature and object of the account there proposed be understood? While it is clear that Hume rejects a metaphysical thesis of the mind as a unitary, simple thinking substance, it is less clear whether he also gives an alternative metaphysical theory of the mind as consisting in a mere succession of discrete impressions and ideas or more modestly offers a description of what we actually observe when inspecting our idea of self. I favor the latter view and argue that Hume’s best and most interesting characterization of the mind is the political analogy of the self as a republic or commonwealth that Hume calls a “true idea of the human mind.” The mind in this metaphor is compared to a dynamic political system of changing members driven by common or shared goals and interacting in determinate ways regulated by its constitution. This system of interconnected ideas already comes with all the elements that a broader, embodied and social self presupposes. It is thus because the idea of mind or self as sketched in the Section “Of Personal Identity” in Book 1 is grounded in the passions that the examination of their nature and mechanisms in Book 2 can be seen by Hume as actually “corroborating” it.