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Dialogue and Universalism

Volume 15
Sources and New Dreams of Western Wisdom

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Displaying: 31-40 of 90 documents


paradigm of surviving: synergy of dialogue and universalism
31. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 15 > Issue: 7/8
Hans-Herbert Kögler Beyond Dogma and Doxa: Truth and Dialogue in Rorty, Apel, and Ratzinger
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The title of the paper productively suggests a double-meaning of truth vis-à-vis dialogue. The claim is both that the concept of truth is essential for a comprehensive conception of dialogue, and that dialogue points toward a concept of truth beyond dogmatic infallibity or doxastic relativism. At stake is to show how truth entails an essentially dialogical moment, and dialogue, if conceived philosophically, must entail the concept of truth.In theological as well as philosophical dogmatism, a final (a priori or revealed) truth is assumed. Interesting are positions such as Cardinal Ratzinger/Pope Benedict XVI’s or Karl-Otto Apel’s “transcendental pragmatics” since they attempt to engage in dialogue yet assume an “infallible” or “ultimately grounded” foundation for their own assumptions. Radically opposed to this infallibilism is the postmodern relativistic view according to which the “groundless grounds” of human understanding make all claims to truth meaningless. Since understanding and dialogue are situated in contingent cultural contexts, as Richard Rorty argues, no ascent to truth is ever possible. The result of our analysis suggests that both positions lead to an insulation of experience from true dialogicalchallenge. Dogmatic positions miss the dialogical core of truth, as they believe that insulated truth-content remains “true” regardless of engaged and challenged reassertions. Doxastic conceptions miss the truth-relation of dialogue, as they fail to capture the seriousness and intentionality of intersubjective and intercultural dialogue.From these critical points emerges a productive concept of dialogue that entails truth as an open-ended and dynamic, and thereby indispensable, concept. Moreover, our analysis lays out that the basic dialogical notions involve truth, openness, and reciprocity in an interconnected way. Dialogue is unavoidable for truth, as much as truth is intrinsic to dialogue. But the new synthesis of truth and dialogue allows for a pluralistic understanding of truth that still, we hope, remains truthful to its content. As such, it alone can ground a non-relativistic notion of multiculturalism.
32. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 15 > Issue: 7/8
Steven V. Hicks, Alan Rosenberg Nietzsche, Safranski, and the Art of Self-Configuration: A Critical Review
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In this critical review essay, we examine Rüdiger Safranski’s “philosophical biography” approach to interpreting Nietzsche. We analyze Safranski’s various attempts tobring the biographical facts of Nietzsche’s life to bear on the philosophical narration in order to shed light on the development of Nietzsche’s philosophical thinking. We argue that there are a number of limitations to Safranski’s “philosophical biography” approach to reading Nietzsche, such as Safranski’s tendency to focus almost exclusively on the earlier stages in the development of Nietzsche’s philosophical thinking. However, we also try to show that the one redeeming virtue of Safranski’s book is that it focuses on the intriguing, but often overlooked, concept of “self-configuration” or “selffashioning” (Selbstgestaltung), and it treats this concept as a unifying thread that runs throughout the maze of Nietzsche’s various multifarious writings. We argue, in conclusion, that Safranski successfully connects Nietzsche’s “highly personal philosophy” to the multifaceted “maneuvers of self-configuration” and to the overall Nietzschean project of “fashioning one’s own identity” in an otherwise meaningless world.
documentation of the iv european congress of dialogue and universalism
33. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 15 > Issue: 7/8
Programme Committee of the IV European Congress of Dialogue and Universalism
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34. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 15 > Issue: 7/8
Jan M. Kaczmarek The Role of Technosophy and its Alliances in the Building of a Civic Information Society in the Age of Universalistic Globalization
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35. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 15 > Issue: 7/8
Hu Yeping, William Sweet George Francis Mclean and the Council for Research in Values and Philosophy: Philosophy in the Service of Humanity
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36. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 15 > Issue: 7/8
Programme of the IV European Congress of Dialogue and Universalism
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37. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 15 > Issue: 7/8
Our Contributors
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38. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 15 > Issue: 5/6
Editor Kinds of an Ways to Wisdom
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nietzsche’s tragic but joyful wisdom — amor fati
39. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 15 > Issue: 5/6
Steven V. Hicks, Alan Rosenberg Nietzsche and Disruptive Wisdom
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In this essay, we examine certain key aspects of Nietzsche’s contribution to the ongoing debate concerning the nature and status of philosophical wisdom. We argue that, for Nietzsche, philosophical wisdom is tantamount to a “disruptive wisdom” which is expressed in a “permanent critique of ourselves” and our entire mode of existence. Philosophical wisdom, so construed, is not a matter of finding “metaphysical comfort” in consoling theories, images, or ideas; nor is it a matter of offering consolation for frustration and suffering. Instead, it is about disrupting or rupturing those prevailing “human, all too human” myths and illusions that perpetuate human frustration and suffering—especially the myths and illusions associated with what Nietzsche terms the “hitherto reigning ascetic ideal” in the West. By disturbing our “dogmatic slumber” in common-place beliefs and values, Nietzsche’s “untimely” atopic philosophers of “disruptive wisdom” evoke the promise of alternate forms of humanity: new ways of valuing the earth and our life on it, new paradigms for a way of life to be achieved in the future. Disruptive philosophers and the wisdom they impart, help liberate and inspire us to experiment with new ways of thinking and valuing, all of which contribute, as Nietzsche sees it, to the reconstituting and “fashioning of the self” as a transformed “second nature”.
40. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 15 > Issue: 5/6
Edith H. Krause Wisdom and the Tightrope of Being. Aspects of Nietzsche in Kafka’s The Metamorphosis (1915)
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This article illuminates Nietzsche’s and Kafka’s spiritual kinship and its manifestation in Kafka’s story The Metamorphosis. Nietzsche’s role as a practitioner of “disruptive wisdom” serves as the point of departure for the examination of Gregor Samsa’s untimely and abrupt transformation into a giant vermin. The article explores Gregor’s development in light of Zarathustra’s parable of the three metamorphoses of the spirit, and it examines the relevance of the myth of the Way in the protagonist’s search for meaning. Central to this discussion are Kafka’s and Nietzsche’s fascination with animal similes and Kafka’s modification of the Nietzschean metaphor of man as a rope.