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31. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research: Volume > 87 > Issue: 2
Kris McDaniel, Heidegger's Metaphysics of Material Beings
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32. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research: Volume > 87 > Issue: 2
John Divers, José Edgar González-Varela, Belief in Absolute Necessity
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We outline a theory of the cognitive role of belief in absolute necessity that is normative and intended to be metaphysically neutral. We take this theory to beunique in scope since it addresses simultaneously the questions of how such belief is (properly) acquired and of how it is (properly) manifest. The acquisition andmanifestation conditions for belief in absolute necessity are given univocally, in terms of complex higher-order attitudes involving two distinct kinds of supposition(A-supposing and C-supposing). It is subsequently argued that the proposed acquisition and manifestation conditions are rationally interdependent, and that suchharmony affords explanations of connections between different facets of belief in necessity that otherwise remain mysterious.
33. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research: Volume > 87 > Issue: 2
Evan G. Williams, Promoting Value As Such
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Without needing to commit to any specific claims about what states of affairs have most agent-neutral value, we can nevertheless predict that states of affairs which are relatively valuable are also relatively likely to occur—on the grounds that, all else equal, at least some other agents are likely to recognize the value of those states of affairs, pursue them because they are valuable, and successfully bring them about as a consequence of that pursuit. This gives us a way to promote value as such, rather than promoting it under some more tendentious description. We can predict that actions which help other people—or our own future selves—to recognize valuable states of affairs, actions which motivate them to pursue whatever states of affairs they beheve to be valuable, or actions which help them succeed at their pursuits will, all else equal, have positive consequences. So we have a pro tanto reason to take such actions, and the subjective justification of that reason is independent of other moral claims.
34. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research: Volume > 87 > Issue: 2
Ian Phillips, Afterimages and Sensation
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discussion
35. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research: Volume > 87 > Issue: 2
Ruth Garrett Millikan, Troubles with Plantinga's Reading of Millikan
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book symposium
36. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research: Volume > 87 > Issue: 2
Richard Kraut, Précis: Against Absolute Goodness
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37. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research: Volume > 87 > Issue: 2
Sarah Stroud, "Good For" supra "Good"
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38. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research: Volume > 87 > Issue: 2
Judith Jarvis Thomson, GOODNESS
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39. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research: Volume > 87 > Issue: 2
Roger Crisp, In Defence of Absolute Goodness
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40. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research: Volume > 87 > Issue: 2
Richard Kraut, Replies to Stroud, Thomson, and Crisp
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