Already a subscriber? - Login here
Not yet a subscriber? - Subscribe here

Displaying: 31-40 of 3836 documents


articles
31. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 4
Brian Kemple The Consolation of a Christian
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
If the desire to see God in Himself belongs to human nature, but the attainment of that vision can be affected only by supernatural grace, how is it that this desire remaining unfulfilled is not a frustration of the nature? How is it that nature is aiming at a good in vain, at an object that it cannot achieve? Even though the elicited natural desire to see God is not fulfilled in this life, and even though there is no demonstrative proof that can be provided by natural reason alone of its being fulfilled after death, the natural human desire is nevertheless not frustrated by a natural deficiency. Rather than being contrary to human nature, this lack of fulfillment exists because of that nature, inasmuch as every human is by nature a limited intellector of being.
32. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 4
Roberto Di Ceglie Preambles of Faith and Modern Accounts of Aquinas’s Thought
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Modern philosophical accounts of faith and reason have often been characterized by the idea that faith in God should be epistemically grounded in the belief that God exists. This idea only partially characterizes the Christian view of faith, at least if we consider Aquinas’s thought, which has often been taken as an exemplary way of handling the relationship between faith and reason. I argue that, even though evidence for God’s existence plays a significant role in Aquinas’s reflections, this is only part of his view of the relation between faith and reason. Unlike many modern interpreters of his works, Aquinas sees not only the role played by reason in arguing for faith, but also the autonomy of faith—the fact that faith stands by itself—and the influence that it can exert on the use of reason, including his discussion of the preambles of faith.
book reviews
33. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 4
Glenn B. Siniscalchi Atheism: What Everyone Needs to Know. By Michael Ruse
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
34. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 4
Joseph W. Koterski, S.J. Friedrich Nietzsche and European Nihilism. By Paul van Tongeren
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
35. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 4
Adam Tamas Tuboly Building the General Relativity and Gravitation Community during the Cold War. By Roberto Lalli
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
36. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 4
Peter N. Bwanali, S.J. Political Illiberalism: A Defense of Freedom. By Peter L. P. Simpson
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
37. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 4
Books Received
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
38. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 4
Index for Volume 58
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
39. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 3
About Our Contributors
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
articles
40. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 3
Gene Fendt Socrates as the Mimesis of Piety in Republic
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
The absence of any discussion of the virtue of piety in Plato’s Republic has been much remarked, but there are textual clues by which to recognize its importance for Plato’s construction and for the book’s intended effect. This dialogue is Socrates’s repetition, on the day after the first festival of Bendis, of a liturgical action that he undertook—at his own expense, at the “vote” of his “city”—on the previous day. Socrates’s activity in repeating it the next day is an “ethological” mimesis of properly pious liturgy. In the course of that liturgy we find that piety is specifically discussed, but in a (mimetic) mirror, and darkly (in its absence). The mirror of piety is the laws about stories of the gods. The absence is in the (missing) discussion of the best city, that is, one above aristocracy.