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Displaying: 31-40 of 3824 documents


articles
31. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 3
Tim Black Action and Luck in the Kierkegaardian Ethical Project
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To see the ethical as a space that is immune to luck, it seems that we must see it as a space that is utterly inner, locked away inside the cabinet of consciousness. If, on the other hand, we wish to see the space of the ethical as extending into the world, it seems that we must see it as being vulnerable to luck. Kierkegaard and his pseudonyms steer us through this dilemma by extending the space of the ethical into the world while also inoculating it against luck. For Kierkegaard, an action is a single thing with two aspects, one under which it is seen in terms of movements of the will, and another under which it is seen in terms of movements in the world. Given the structure of the Kierkegaardian ethical project, these movements are immune to luck since they can always achieve their ethical aims: they can always count as doing what one’s ideal self would do.
32. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 3
Andrew Israelsen Imperatives of Right: The Essential Ambiguity in Kant’s Rechtslehre
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The relationship between Kant’s “Doctrine of Right” and his broader moral philosophy is a fraught one, with some readers insisting that the two domains are mutually supporting parts of a cohesive practical philosophy and others arguing for their conceptual and legislative independence. In this paper I investigate the reasons for this disparity and argue that both main interpretive camps are mistaken, for Kant’s Rechtslehre can neither be reconciled to his moral philosophy nor stand on its own. I argue that this failure results from Kant’s confused attempt to define the sphere of right as one that functions independently of (yet analogously to) the moral domain through the construction of non-moral yet categorical imperatives. The result is a fundamental tension in Kant’s text that can only be solved through either collapsing juridical duties into broad moral duties or denying any categorical status to duties of right.
33. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 3
Christopher James Wolfe, Jonathan Polce, S.J. A Response to John Rawls’s Critique of Loyola on the Human Good
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In this paper we shall consider whether John Rawls’s treatment of Ignatius of Loyola is a fair one. Rawls claims in A Theory of Justice that Catholic theology (and Ignatius’s theology in particular) aims at a “dominant end” of serving God that overrides other moral considerations. Rawls argues that dominant end views lead to a disfigured self and a disregard for justice. We do not question Rawls on the normative issue of whether dominant end conceptions are untenable, but rather on his factual claim that Ignatian spirituality and Catholic theology in general presupposes a dominant end view as he defines it. The Loyola whom Rawls attacks in Theory of Justice is a straw-man. Ignatian spirituality and Catholic theology in general embraces something closer to an inclusive end view, since it argues that several different ways of virtuous living can lead to happiness.
book reviews
34. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 3
Sophie Berman The A Priori in the Thought of Descartes: Cognition, Method and Science. By Jan Palkoska
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35. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 3
Justin M. Anderson Aquinas on Virtue: A Causal Reading. By Nicholas Austin, S.J.
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36. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 3
Aaron Segal David Shatz: Torah, Philosophy, and Culture. Edited by Hava Tirosh-Samuelson and Aaron W. Hughes
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37. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 3
Joseph W. Koterski, S.J. Plato’s Persona: Marsilio Ficio, Renaissance Humanism, and Platonic Traditions. By Denis J.-J. Robichaud
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38. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 3
Books Received
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39. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 2
About Our Contributors
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articles
40. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 58 > Issue: 2
Lorraine Yeung The Nature of Horror Reconsidered
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There is a growing interest in the role of non-cognitive affective responses in the philosophical literature on fiction and emotion. This flurry of scholarly interest is partly a reaction to cognitivist accounts of fiction and emotion that have been found to be inadequate. The inadequacy is particularly salient when this approach is employed to account for narrative horror. Cognitivist conceptions of the emotion engendered by narrative horror prove to be too restrictive. Cognitivist accounts also fail to give the formal devices and stylistic elements deployed in narrative horror a proper place within the spectator’s emotional engagement with it. In this paper I propose an alternative conception of the emotion “horror” that incorporates non-cognitive affective responses. I argue that this conception of “horror” is more fine-grained than the one characterized as a cognitivist approach. It captures more literary examples of the horror experience and it accommodates better the fear of the unknown. It also makes possible an aesthetics of horror in which formal devices and stylistic elements are given their proper place.