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Displaying: 31-40 of 720 documents


articles
31. Forum Philosophicum: Volume > 21 > Issue: 1
Deborah Casewell Reading Heidegger through the Cross: On Eberhard Jüngel’s Heideggerian Ontology
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This article is concerned with how a particular concept of ontology switched from theistic to atheistic to theistic again due to the influences and disciples of Martin Heidegger. It is agreed that Heidegger took aspects of Christian thought, namely from Augustine of Hippo, Martin Luther, and Søren Kierkegaard, stripping them of their relation to God and instead orientating them to nothingness. Despite Heidegger’s methodological atheism, his ontology was taken up by a number of theologians such as Ernst Fuchs and Rudolf Bultmann, who in their turn influenced Eberhard Jüngel, who in turn mentioned the direct influence that Heidegger has on his thought. Whilst Jüngel acknowledges his debts to Heidegger in the area of ontology, Jüngel also seeks to incorporate the history of God into ontology, where the history of God as Trinity is defined by the passivity of Christ on the cross, and how that event redefines evil’s work in nothingness. This article initially explores how Heidegger formulated his account of ontology, then explores how Jüngel re-Christianized Heidegger’s ontology; evaluating what can be drawn from these shifts about the relationship between ontology and history.
book reviews
32. Forum Philosophicum: Volume > 21 > Issue: 1
Krzysztof Śnieżyński Vernunftreligion und Offenbarungsglaube. Zur Erörterung einer seit Kant verschärften Problematik
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33. Forum Philosophicum: Volume > 21 > Issue: 1
Łukasz Bartkowicz Philosopher’s Crystal: The Treacherous Terrain of Tassatarius
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34. Forum Philosophicum: Volume > 21 > Issue: 1
Note about Forum Philosophicum
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35. Forum Philosophicum: Volume > 20 > Issue: 2
Sotiris Mitralexis, Georgios Steiris Guest Editors' Note
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36. Forum Philosophicum: Volume > 20 > Issue: 2
Marcin Podbielski Editorial Note
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37. Forum Philosophicum: Volume > 20 > Issue: 2
Abbreviations Used in Current Issue
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articles
38. Forum Philosophicum: Volume > 20 > Issue: 2
Jack Louis Pappas Otherwise than Identity, or Beyond Difference: Maximus the Confessor and the Hypostatic-Transfigurement of Fundamental Ontology
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This paper locates in the philosophy of Maximus the Confessor a remarkable concern for the temporality, finitude, and historicity of the human soul, that at once anticipates Heidegger’s “fundamental ontology,” but which is also capable of overcoming the limitations of philosophical nihilism. In taking up Heidegger’s claim that the recovery of ontology (and philosophy itself) depends upon the understanding of Being always in relation to its self-revelation in the finite and historical reality of human existence, it becomes clear that contemporary philosophical expression requires a “turning away” from the conceptual unity of finite beings and eternal Being, and a movement toward a radically subjective negativity. In contrast to his Neoplatonic forebears, Maximus presents a mode of thinking which is capable of surpassing Heideggerian negation, not through a denial of human particularity or finitude, but rather through a transformation of the very categories of Being and non-being themselves through his understanding of divine personhood. For Maximus such personhood is conceived of as transcending both Being and time, and yet without any loss of transcendence comes also to partake fully of both through the mystery of the Incarnation. According to Maximus, this radical event of be-coming forever transfigures the sphere of beings, bringing the historical into the transcendent, non-Being into Being, and death into life.
39. Forum Philosophicum: Volume > 20 > Issue: 2
Ty Monroe I Know You Above All; I Know You Not: St. Maximus the Confessor on Divine and Human Knowledge and Love
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This essay considers distinct ways of understanding these complexities, specifically by reference to the anthropological and metaphysical thought of St. Maximus the Confessor. Maximus’ understanding of human knowledge and volition and desire are interpreted in light of his commitments concerning doctrine of God, read through his systematic correction of a broadly “Origenist” aversion to metaphysical motion.
40. Forum Philosophicum: Volume > 20 > Issue: 2
Emma Brown Dewhurst The Ontology of Virtue as Participation in Divine Love in the Works of St. Maximus the Confessor
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This paper demonstrates the ontological status of virtue as an instance of love within the cosmology of St. Maximus the Confessor. It shows that we may posit the real existence of a “virtue” in so far as we understand it to have its basis in, and to be an instance of love. Since God is love and the virtues are logoi, it becomes possible and beneficial to parallel the relationship between love and the virtues with Maximus’ exposition of the Logos and the logoi. In particular, Vladimir Cvetković’s interpretation of the circle and radii analogy will be utilized. It will be shown that when one practices a virtue, one is practicing and participating in love, and, by extension, partaking in God. Within the context of Maximus’ cosmology, this means that practicing virtue and love is the ultimate purpose of humanity in its journey to gather all creation to communion with God. This paper is primarily an exposition of primary sources from St. Maximus, but discussion of the ontology of virtue is made with a view to bringing it into dialogue with modern theories of virtue ethics. This paper arises in part as a response to the August 2013 papers by Andrew Louth and Paul M. Blowers on the need for increased scholarship on Maximus and virtue ethics.