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21. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 39 > Issue: 2
Walter Gulick, Paul Lewis Submissions for Publication
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22. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 39 > Issue: 2
David W. Agler What Engineers Can Do but Physicists Can’t: Polanyi and Margitay on Machines
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This is a comment on Tihamér Margitay’s “From Epistemology to Ontology,” where he criticizes Polanyi’s claim that there is a systematic correspondence between the levels of ontology and the levels of tacit knowing. Margitay contends that Polanyi supports this correspondence by appealing to a “purely ontological argument,” one which concludes that it is impossible to reduce machines to a singular, chemical-physical type, and criticizes this claim by pointing to industrial standards (machines that do reduce to singular physical-chemical type). I respond to Margitay’s claim by distinguishing two different “purely ontological arguments” in Polanyi’s thought (one relying on the multi-realizability of a machine in different physical-chemical types, the other pointing to the inability of a purely physical-chemical ontology to account for the artificial shaping and functioning of machines). With these two arguments clarified, Margitay’s criticism by appealing to industrial standards loses much of its initial force.
23. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 39 > Issue: 2
Notes on Contributors
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24. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 39 > Issue: 2
John V. Apczynski Does Polanyi’s Thought Affirm A “Correspondence Thesis”?
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These remarks are comments on Tihamér Margitay’s criticisms of Polanyi’s so-called “correspondence thesis” in his recent essay “From Epistemology to Ontology.”
25. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 39 > Issue: 2
Mihály Héder Emergent Knowledge and Its Challenge to Reductionist Thought
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The title of Tihamér Margitay’s recent article “From Epistemology to Ontology” refers to a strong interpretation of Polanyi’s correspondence between knowing and being that enables ontological claims on purely epistemic grounds. I accept Margitay’s final conclusion which rejects strong correspondence, although on entirely different grounds. In addition, I point out that his treatment of Polanyi’s ontological claims about machines is based on yet unfounded assumptions about the nature of physics and technical design.
26. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 39 > Issue: 2
Notes on Contributors--continued from p. 26
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27. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 39 > Issue: 2
Kyle Takaki Margitay on Emergence and Ontological Hierarchy
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Tihamér Margitay makes two key moves against Polanyi’s hierarchical ontology in his essay “From Epistemology to Ontology.” I address these two moves and defend Polanyi from a complex-systems point of view.
28. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 39 > Issue: 2
Tihamér Margitay Polanyi’s Ontology from Inside: A Reply to My Critics
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In this essay, I first sketch Polanyi’s three arguments for layered ontology and the arguments against them which I put forward in Margitay (2010). I then discuss two recurrent themes in the several comments on my essay in this issue of Tradition and Discovery. The balance of the paper gives detailed responses to each comment.
reviews
29. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 39 > Issue: 2
Paul Lewis Jonathan Haidt, The Righteous Mind: Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion
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30. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 39 > Issue: 2
Diane Yeager Michael S. Hogue, The Promise of Religious Naturalism
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31. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 39 > Issue: 2
Trevor Anderson Victor Lee Austin, Up with Authority
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32. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
Phil Mullins Preface
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33. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
News and Notes
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34. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
Submissions for Publication
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35. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
2012 Polanyi Society Annual Meeting Program
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36. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
Mary Jo Nye “Michael Polanyi and the Social Construction of Science”
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Scholars in the field of social studies of science marked the year 2012 as the 50th anniversary of the publication of Thomas S. Kuhn’s The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. Kuhn’s book is routinely cited as the beginning of a new intellectual movement that jettisoned logical and empiricist accounts of scientific progress in favor of sociological and psychological explanations of scientific practice. In contrast, this essay argues that the roots of the social construction of science lie earlier, in the 1930s, in the political milieu, scientific careers, and intellectual debates of a generation in which Michael Polanyi was a central figure. Crucial elements in the development of Polanyi’s philosophy of science are examined, with comparisons to J. D Bernal, Karl Mannheim and others of their generation, as well as to the younger Thomas Kuhn and to Karl Popper.
37. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
Walter Gulick “Polanyian Biosemiotics and the From-Via-To Dimensions of Meaning”
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A central aim of Michael Polanyi’s philosophy is to demonstrate the many ways in which human existence is meaningful to counter the nihilistic and positivistic accounts that contributed to the world wars and totalitarian governments in the twentieth century. Yet Polanyi’s references to various sorts of meaning is suggestive rather than systematic and coherent. The objective of this essay is to show the relationship between the different aspects of meaning by viewing their emergence in cosmological perspective beginning with simple forms of life and culminating in the ways signals, perception, and language support human experiences of significance. Emergence, embodiment, and “from-via-to” interpretation are key ingredients in this Polanyian version of biosemiotics.
38. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
Will Stillwell, Jere Moorman “Gregory Bateson’s Re-Visioning of Epistemology”
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The following three related contributions jointly serve to lift up elements of the thought of the anthropolo­gist Gregory Bateson that can be fruitfully compared with elements of Michael Polanyi’s thought. In a brief introduction, William Stillwell reviews Bateson’s life and developing interests. Stillwell also provides, in a creative dialog form akin to Bateson’s own dialogs, a short review article on Noel Charlton’s Understanding Gregory Bateson: Mind, Beauty and the Sacred Earth. The third piece is Jere Moorman’s short 1991 essay (now out of print) discussing Polanyi’s ideas about tacit knowing and their connection with Bateson’s ideas about the double bind.
39. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
Electronic Discussion List and WWW Polanyi Resources
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40. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
David Rutledge A Teaching Philosopher: The Work Of Jerry Gill
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This is an overview of the publications of Jerry Gill, sketching his background, common themes in his work, and some strengths and weaknesses in that work. I note the accessibility of his treatments of postmodern philosophy, and the usefulness of these works for undergraduate classrooms. The “search for a post-critical philosophy” of religion, language, epistemology, and education has given direction to Gill’s career.