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Displaying: 21-30 of 39 documents


reviews
21. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 42 > Issue: 2
Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino Dialogue on Consciousness: Minds, Brains, and Zombies, by John Perry
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22. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 42 > Issue: 2
Timothy Chambers A Cabinet of Philosophical Curiosities: A Collection of Oddities, Riddles and Dilemmas, by Roy Sorensen
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23. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 42 > Issue: 2
Bryan Ellrod Moral Choices: An Introduction to Ethics, 4th edition, by Scott B. Rae: An Introduction to Ethics, 4th edition
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24. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 42 > Issue: 2
Erinn Gilson Food Justice and Narrative Ethics: Reading Stories for Ethical Awareness and Activism, by Beth A. Dixon
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25. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 42 > Issue: 2
Antonia LoLordo Lady Mary Shepherd: Selected Writings, edited by Deborah Boyle
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26. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 42 > Issue: 2
Karen Paul Markets without Limits, by Jason Brennan and Peter M. Jaworski
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27. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 42 > Issue: 2
Kenneth E. Walden Aesthetics: A Reader in the Philosophy of the Arts, 4th edition, edited by David Goldblatt, Lee B. Brown, and Stephanie Patridge
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articles
28. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 42 > Issue: 1
T. Ryan Byerly Teaching for Intellectual Virtue in Logic and Critical Thinking Classes: Why and How
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Introductory-level undergraduate classes in Logic or Critical Thinking are a staple in the portfolio of many Philosophy programs. A standard approach to these classes is to include teaching and learning activities focused on formal deductive and inductive logic, sometimes accompanied by teaching and learning activities focused on informal fallacies or argument construction. In this article, I discuss a proposal to include an additional element within these classes—namely, teaching and learning activities focused on intellectual virtues. After clarifying the proposal, I identify three reasons in favor of implementing it and I discuss how to implement it, focusing on questions about pedagogical strategies and pedagogical resources.
29. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 42 > Issue: 1
Daniel Collette Virtual Reality as Experiential Learning: A Case Study in Anxiety and Walking the Plank
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While the pedagogical benefits of experiential learning are well known, classroom technology is a more contentious topic. In my experience, philosophy instructors are hesitant to embrace technology in their pedagogy. A great deal of this trepidation is justified: when technology serves only to replicate existing methods without contributing to course objectives, it unnecessarily adds extra work for the instructor and can even be a distraction from learning. However, I believe, if applied appropriately, technology can be used to positively enhance the philosophy classroom experience in ways that are not possible in traditional classroom settings – including new ways of experiential learning. To demonstrate this, I offer a case study of implementing virtual reality (VR) as a tool for experiential learning of philosophy. I show how having students “walk a plank” off a skyscraper in VR allowed me to exceed my course objectives for my Existentialism course in particularly effective ways that I could not have done without this technology.
30. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 42 > Issue: 1
Jesse Fitts, David Beisecker Two-Sided Trees for Sentential Logic, Predicate Logic, and Sentential Modal Logic
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This paper will present two contributions to teaching introductory logic. The first contribution is an alternative tree proof method that differs from the traditional one-sided tree method. The second contribution combines this tree system with an index system to produce a user-friendly tree method for sentential modal logic.