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Displaying: 21-30 of 2865 documents


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21. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 4
Katharine Loevy, The Dimension of Difference: Space, Time and Bodies in Women’s Cinema and Continental Philosophy, by Caroline Godart
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22. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 4
Jennifer McCrickerd, Emotions, Learning, and the Brain: Exploring the Educational Implications of Affective Neuroscience, by Mary Helen Immordino-Yang
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23. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 4
Alan Reynolds, Philosophy, Politics, and Economics: An Anthology, edited by Jonathan Anomaly, Geoffrey Brennan, Michael Munger, and Geoffrey Sayre-McCord
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24. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 4
Clint Tibbs, Ultimate Questions: Thinking About Philosophy, 3rd edition, by Nils Ch. Rauhut
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25. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 4
Sarah E. Vitale, The Problems of Contemporary Philosophy: A Critical Guide for the Unaffiliated, by Paul Livingston and Andrew Cutrofello
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26. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 4
John Philip Waterman, The Philosophy of Cognitive Science, by M. J. Cain
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27. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 4
Timothy Yenter, Philosophy’s Artful Conversation, by D. N. Rodowick
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28. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 4
Index to Volume 39
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articles
29. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 3
Heidi Gauder, Fred W. Jenkins, The Research Skills of Undergraduate Philosophy Majors: Teaching Information Literacy
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This article presents a case study of how one school introduced a one-credit course for philosophy majors focused on effective searching for and critical evaluation of primary and secondary sources. The course curriculum is based on departmental learning outcomes, and is also aligned with the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) standards.
30. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 3
Dan Lowe, Remembrance of Philosophy Classes Past: Why Cognitive Science Suggests that a Brief Recap Is the Best Way to Start Each Class Day
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In the past few decades there has been rapid progress in cognitive science with respect to how people learn. Indeed, it can be difficult to keep up with all of the recent findings, and it is sometimes unclear how these findings should influence day-to-day teaching in the philosophy classroom. But one simple way to use the insights of cognitive science in the philosophy classroom is to begin each class with a five-minute recap of the previous few lessons. Cognitive science suggests that such a practice can greatly aid student learning by increasing retention of material and skills. I explain why teachers of philosophy ought to take the time to do such a recap by outlining some recent and surprising findings in the science of how people learn, and put forward concrete suggestions for making such a recap as effective as possible.