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21. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 4
Kathryn J. Norlock, Grading (Anxious and Silent) Participation: Assessing Student Attendance and Engagement with Short Papers on a “Question For Consideration”
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The inclusion of attendance and participation in course grade calculations is ubiquitous in postsecondary syllabi, but can penalize the silent or anxious student unfairly. I outline the obstacles posed by social anxiety, then describe an assignment developed with the twin goals of assisting students with obstacles to participating in spoken class discussions, and rewarding methods of participation other than oral interaction. When homework assignments habituating practices of writing well-justified questions regarding well-documented passages in reading assignments are the explicit project of weekly class meetings, participation increases on the part of all students. My focus shifted away from concern that I must get students to talk more, and turned instead to ensuring their marks reflected their learning rather than their speaking. Students’ improved engagement as a result of the assignment bears out evidence in the literature for active learning and for alternatives to taking attendance and quantifying participation.
22. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 4
Andrew J. Pierce, Interest Convergence: An Alternative to White Privilege Models of Anti-Racist Pedagogy and Practice
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In this paper, I offer a psychologically informed critique of and alternative to approaches to teaching issues of race and racial justice that are based on the recognition of white privilege. White privilege pedagogy, I argue, faces serious limitations avoided by a pedagogy grounded in “interest convergence.” Advanced by critical race theorist Derrick Bell, the theory of interest convergence holds that racial progress is most likely when the interests of whites converge with the interests of oppressed racial groups. Applying this insight to pedagogical practice, I argue that it has the potential to overcome white resistance to acknowledging and addressing racial injustice, in the classroom and in the broader public sphere. After making this case in general terms, I illustrate it concretely by describing an interest convergence-based approach to teaching affirmative action.
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23. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 4
Timothy Chambers, Teaching Plato In Palestine: Philosophy in a Divided World, by Carlos Fraenkel
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24. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 4
Michael Clifford, Engaging Political Philosophy: An Introduction, by Robert B. Talisse
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25. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 4
Sam Cowling, Time: A Philosophical Introduction, by James Harrington
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26. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 4
Dara Fogel, Lusting for Infinity: A Spiritual Odyssey, by Tom W. Boyd
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27. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 4
Katharine Loevy, The Dimension of Difference: Space, Time and Bodies in Women’s Cinema and Continental Philosophy, by Caroline Godart
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28. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 4
Jennifer McCrickerd, Emotions, Learning, and the Brain: Exploring the Educational Implications of Affective Neuroscience, by Mary Helen Immordino-Yang
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29. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 4
Alan Reynolds, Philosophy, Politics, and Economics: An Anthology, edited by Jonathan Anomaly, Geoffrey Brennan, Michael Munger, and Geoffrey Sayre-McCord
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30. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 4
Clint Tibbs, Ultimate Questions: Thinking About Philosophy, 3rd edition, by Nils Ch. Rauhut
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