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Displaying: 21-30 of 2819 documents


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21. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
John Immerwahr, From Self-Centered to Learner-Centered
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Successful learning is based on a reciprocal relationship between instructor and student that, in turn, requires the instructor to have a deep understanding of the student’s background, interests, fears and resistances. In fact, many beginning philosophy instructors have a rather limited understanding of what their students bring to the educational interaction. The conclusion is that training in pedagogy must be more than teaching techniques but should also include more exposure to an understanding of the experience of contemporary college students. An experimental graduate student teacher preparation at Villanova University is presented as a model to stimulate further thought.
22. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
Karen L. Hornsby, The Pedagogical Imperative: Achieving Areté in Philosophy Graduate Programs
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This article is a commentary response to the study results outlined in “The State of Teacher Training in Philosophy.” In recognition of the study’s determination that 70 percent of the jobs new philosophers will apply for are non-tenure track, our graduate programs must provide training in teaching excellence and the fostering of student learning, or what I call pedagogical areté. I will argue that achieving this teaching excellence requires 1) Familiarity with cognitive neuroscience advancements on how people learn, 2) Knowledge of today’s college students, and 3) Practiced methods for scaffolding and assessment of student learning. My claim is that pedagogic excellence is both a role-related moral obligation and a duty we owe to society—what Lee Shulman characterizes as the pedagogical imperative. This increased focus on pedagogical proficiency creates an opportunity for philosophy to establish and solidify its disciplinary value.
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23. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
David J. Buller, Truth, by Chase Wrenn
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24. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
Dana Delibovi, Persons and Personal Identity, by Amy Kind
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25. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
Sheryle Dixon, Plato at the Googleplex: Why Philosophy Won't Go Away, by Rebecca Newberger Goldstein
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26. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
Rebeka Ferreira, Puzzled?! An Introduction to Philosophizing, by Richard Kenneth Atkins
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27. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
John M. Hersey, Existentialism: An Introduction, by Kevin Aho
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28. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
Kendy M. Hess, Environmental Ethics: From Theory to Practice, by Marion Hourdequin
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29. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
Karen M. Meagher, Public Health Ethics, Second Edition, by Stephen Holland
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30. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
David S. Owen, Subject and Object: Frankfurt School Writings on Epistemology, Ontology, and Method, edited by Ruth Groff
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