Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business

Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business
2001, ISBN 978-1-889680-21-7
Editors: Stewart W. Herman, Arthur Gross Schaefer

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Displaying: 21-33 of 33 documents


christianity
21. Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business: Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business
Shirley J. Roels The Business Ethics of Evangelicals
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Understanding the evangelical framework for business ethics is important, since business evangelicals are well positioned to exercise considerable future influence. This article develops the context for understanding evangelical business ethics by examining their history, theology, and culture. It then relates the findings to evangelical foundations for business ethics. The thesis is that business ethics, as practiced by those in the evangelical community, has developed inductively from a base of applied experience. As a result, emphases on piety, witnessing, tithing, and neighborliness, important foundations in the evangelical model for business ethics, have resulted in a multitude of applied ethical strategies. This operative ethics model is then evaluated, particularly in regarding to its limited focus on the fundamental purposes and structures of business. The article concludes with severalrecommended sources that can enrich the evangelical tradition of business ethics, suggesting many resources from the Reformed Christian tradition as well as other ideas from contemporary Protestant and Catholic thinkers.
22. Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business: Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business
Protestantism: Lutherans
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23. Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business: Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business
James M. Childs, Jr. Lutheran Perspectives on Ethical Business in an Age of Downsizing
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Fundamental theological and ethical themes of Luther's thought and tradition provide a basis for appreciating both the role of business in God's providential design and the importance of occupation for living out one's Christian vocation. These same insights establish the ethical basis for a critical appraisal of the current practice of downsizing and its negative impact on the quality of individual lives and whole communities. While Lutheran ethics is realistic about the ambiguities of life, it is also an ethic of compassionate love seeking justice in the world of business as in all of life.
24. Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business: Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business
Protestantism: Mennonites
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25. Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business: Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business
James Halteman A Mennonite Approach to Business Ethics
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Mennonites in the U.S. trace their roots back to the early sixteenth century Anabaptist reformers in Europe. Believing that the church is to give a foretaste of the coming kingdom of God, Mennonites emphasize discipleship, community, and the conviction that God works in the world through two distinct kingdoms. In the early days of persecution, the divide between the two kingdoms was clear, but, as Mennonites became mainstreamed in a tolerant society, the divide between secular and sacred became ambiguous. Mennonites believe that faith calls them to a higher ethical standard in business than they can expect of society at large: to be in the business world but not of it. Discipleship means witnessing to the non-Christian world. Consequently, Mennonite businesspersons seek to be servant-managers and servant-owners.
islam
26. Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business: Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business
Islam
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27. Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business: Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business
Jamal A. Badawi Islamic Business Ethics
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This essay focuses on the normative teachings of Islam. Justice, honesty, and public welfare are the pillars of Islamic business ethics. These values have two major roots: (1) belief in and devotion to Allah (God), and (2) the earthly trusteeship that grounds moral accountability. The business values of productivity, hard work, and excellence are encouraged. However, at the heart of various injunctions relating to business transactions are the imperatives of lawfulness, honesty, and fair play. Products or services must be lawful, and produced in lawful ways causing no undue harm to others or to the environment. Competition, distribution, and consumption must be lawful as well. Lawful behavior is enforced by consciousness of Allah, supportive social norms, and government control. Islamic norms may not be uniformly or strictly followed, yet they provide a helpful background to practitioners andresearchers.
28. Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business: Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business
Abdulaziz Sachedina The Issue of Riba in Islamic Faith and Law
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With the growth of Muslim economies, both at the national and international levels, the issue of riba (interest, usury) poses great difficulties. The charging or receiving of riba has been forbidden in Islam, which presents a major problem to financial institutions that charge interest. Muslim legal scholars belonging to all schools of legal thought have reinterpreted scriptural sources to accommodate drastic economic changes; practical considerations have forced Muslim groups, both of Sunni and Shi'ite persuasion, to justify interest-based banking and other institutions of finance. As a matter of religion, the status of interest is far from resolved. However, within the legal tradition, there are ethical principles like maslahah (public good) and la darar wa la dirar (no harm, no harassment) that will determine the future direction of a Muslim search for a morally responsible economy.
judaism
29. Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business: Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business
Judaism
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30. Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business: Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business
Elliot N. Dorff Judaism, Business, and Privacy
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This article first describes some of the chief contrasts between Judaism and American secularism in their underlying convictions about the business environment and the expectations that all involved in business can have of each other-namely, duties vs. rights, communitarianism vs. individualism, and ties to God and to the environment based on our inherent status as God's creatures rather than on our pragmatic choice. Conservative Judaism's methodology for plumbing the Jewish tradition for guidance is described and contrasted to those of Orthodox and Reform Judaism.One example of how Conservative Judaism can inform us on a current matter is developed at some length-namely, privacy in the workplace. That section discusses (1) the reasons for protecting privacy; (2) protection from intrusion, including employer spying; (3) protection from disclosure of that intended to remain private; (4) individualistic vs. communitarian approaches to grounding the concern for privacy; and (5) contemporary implications for insuring privacy in business.
31. Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business: Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business
Ronald M. Green Guiding Principles of Jewish Ethics
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This discussion develops six of the most important guiding principles of classical Jewish business ethics and illustrates their application to a complex recent case of product liability. These principles are: (1) the legitimacy of business activity and profit; (2) the divine origin and ordination of wealth (and hence the limits and obligations of human ownership); (3) the preeminent position in decision making given to the protection and preservation (sanctity) of human life; (4) the protection of consumers from commercial harm; (5) the avoidance of fraud and misrepresentation in sales transactions; and (6)the moral requirement to go beyond the letter of the law. Although these Talmudic principles are clearly obligatory only for "Torah-obedient" Orthodox and Hasidic Jews, many Jews share a sensibility informed by them. Non-Jews, too, may be instructed by Jewish teachings about business ethics.
32. Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business: Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business
Laurie Zoloth Her Work Sings Her Praise: A Framework for a Feminist Jewish Ethic of Economic Life
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Jewish ethics provides resources not only for exotic cases, but also for the practical necessities of everyday business practice, such as sustaining non-profit health care. Non-profit health care presents tough choices for justice because it is motivated by community compassion but must meet the pressures of the marketplace. Feminist ethics offers an "ethics of care" to guide our actions in such conflicts. This article argues that an ethics derived from both ferrlinism and Jewish sources calls for a different approach, one which is rooted in the history of business practice, in the history of women's leadership in this health care, and in the Jewish legal teaching (halacha) that seeks a balance between competing moral appeals in the marketplace.
33. Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business: Spiritual Goods: Faith Traditions and the Practice of Business
Contributors
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