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hegel and constructivism
21. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 48 > Issue: 1/2
Kenneth R. Westphal Hegel’s Natural Law Constructivism: Fundamentals of Republicanism
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Replying to my four commentators allows me to clarify some distinctive features and merits of Hegel’s natural law constructivism; how Hegel’s insights have been obscured by common, though inadequate philosophical taxonomies; and how Hegel’s natural law constructivism contributes centrally to moral philosophy today, including ethics, justice, philosophy of law and philosophy of education.
review article
22. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 48 > Issue: 1/2
Gregory Moss Reading German Idealism: Constructivism and Its Discontents
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Rockmore’s book German Idealism as Constructivism is an ambitious attempt to show that German Idealism is a tradition characterized by the project of perfecting constructivism. On the one hand, Rockmore offers good evidence that this is the case, and it seems indisputable that the German Idealists are preoccupied with this issue. In addition, the text offers deep insights and is particularly strong as concerns the relation of the various Idealists to natural science and the history of science. On the other hand, there is also good evidence that casts some doubt on Rockmore’s thesis. German Idealism as Constructivism may not close the book on this issue, but it certainly contributes to the conversation, and should be taken seriously by any good student of the tradition.
book reviews
23. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 48 > Issue: 1/2
George R. Lucas, Jr. George L. Kline. On Hegel
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24. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 48 > Issue: 1/2
Eric v.d. Luft Aakash Singh Rathore and Rimina Mohapatra. Hegel’s India: A Reinterpretation, with Texts
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25. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 48 > Issue: 1/2
New Books
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26. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 48 > Issue: 1/2
Recent Dissertations
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27. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 47 > Issue: 1/2
Kenneth R. Westphal The Beginning of Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit: Introduction (Einleitung) and Consciousness: Sense Certainty, Perception, Force & Understanding
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28. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 47 > Issue: 1/2
David Ciavatta Hegel on the Parallels between Action and the Ontology of Life
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This paper shows that Hegel’s ontology of living beings provides us with indispensable conceptual resources for making sense of his account of the ontology of human action. For Hegel, living bodies are ontologically distinct in that their objective presence is thoroughly permeated by the self-reflexivity characteristic of subjectivity, and as such they cannot be adequately conceived in terms of categories (mechanistic, chemical, or generally causal categories) that are appropriate to inanimate, “subject-less” objects. It is argued that actions are similar in this regard, and like organic bodies they need to be conceived as self-realizing, self-articulating, dynamic wholes whose various material parts cannot be thought independently of their internal relations and their place in the whole. It is argued, further, that the categories Hegel appeals to in conceiving how organisms develop through stages are useful for making sense of how the objective shape of an action unfolds over time.
29. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 47 > Issue: 1/2
Douglas Finn Spiritual Consumption: Eating and the Christian Eucharist in Hegel
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This article seeks to gain a new perspective on Hegel’s Eucharistic theology by reading it through the lens of his philosophy of nature, specifically, his extensive discussion of animal eating, digestion, and excretion. This juxtaposition confirms Walter Jaeschke’s claim that Hegel, in offering a philosophical interpretation of the Eucharist, articulates a sacramental principle governing the whole of reality. In Hegel’s system, the biological process of assimilation serves as a master image of the work of Spirit across a number of natural, cultural, religious, and philosophical phenomena.
30. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 47 > Issue: 1/2
George di Giovanni A Second Note Regarding the Recent Translation of Hegel's "Greater Logic"
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