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21. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 4
Volume 14 Index
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22. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3
Edward J. Furton, MA., PhD. In This Issue
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23. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3
Rebecca Peck, MD Colloquy
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24. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3
Richard M. Doerflinger Washington Insider
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essays
25. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3
Elizabeth Ramage Pope Francis on Health Care: A Missionary among Us
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Today, Catholic health care involves complex medical professional organizations, incredible technological and scientific accomplishments, prohibitive costs, and interfering governmental participation. Notwithstanding the challenges presented by the structural transformation of Catholic hospitals in recent years, Pope Francis’s instruction revives the duty of health care professionals to act as missionaries. This essay explores why Francis maintains the importance of building Catholic health care during these changing circumstances. Confronting the penchant of our modern medical culture to marginalize the weakest members of our society, Francis addresses the perils that follow when health care professionals are no longer seen as servants to the dignity of all life. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 14.3 (Autumn 2014): 421–428.
26. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3
Robin Pierucci, MD Gestational Age in Periviable Newborns: An Insufficient Criterion for Deciding Intervention
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When the delivery of a baby at the edge of viability (twenty-two to twenty-five weeks) is imminent, gestational age is usually the primary indi­cator for resuscitation. However, four other variables—female sex, antenatal corticosteroid therapy, singleton birth, and increased birth weight—are also associated with better infant survival and neurologic outcome in intensive care, and the combination of all five variables provides a stronger prognostic tool. An ethical framework is provided here for use in determining whether proposed treatments are likely to defend the dignity and sanctity of a fragile periviable life. The framework is based on the principle of ordinary/propor­tionate and extraordinary/disproportionate medical treatment. The author recommends using the most recent outcome data and this ethical framework together to make perinatal resuscitation decisions. Use of gestational age alone is insufficient and ethically immoral. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 14.3 (Autumn 2014): 429–439.
27. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3
Br. Glenn Breed, MSA The Only Moral Option Is Embryo Adoption
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Approximately 800,000 human embryos are currently in cryostorage in the United States. The Catholic Church holds that in vitro fertilization (IVF) and cryopreservation of human embryos are intrinsically evil. IVF continues to increase at a rate of approximately 9 percent per annum. Many Catholic couples have used IVF as a means to conceive a child. There are typically additional embryos that are cryopreserved for later use. Once a couple has reached the number of children they desire, they are faced with a very difficult moral decision regarding the disposition of their remaining frozen embryos. The biological parents must choose one of four options. Three result in death of their frozen embryos. Only one can possibly result in life. The only moral option is embryo adoption, a life-giving choice that is strongly supported by Sacred Scripture and Sacred Tradition. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 14.3 (Autumn 2014): 441–447.
28. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3
Katherine Wasson, E. David Cook The Common Harm in Bioethics and Public Health
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Catholic ethical teaching has increasingly relied on a concept of the common good for making and evaluating social decisions. The authors have argued that the common good is a maximal and ideal concept about which people and communities differ fundamentally. In practice, it does not resolve moral and social disagreements. The concept of the common harm is preferable because it is a minimal standard that can be more clearly identified and agreed for individuals and society, providing a basis for legislative and social action. Bioethics and public health both have strong roots in doing no harm and preventing harm to both individuals and communities in society. The authors argue that the application of the concept of the common harm from these disciplines into wider use in the health professions and public policy would be beneficial. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 14.3 (Autumn 2014): 449–455.
articles
29. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3
Louise A. Mitchell Major Changes in Principles of Biomedical Ethics: A Review of Seven Editions of Beauchamp and Childress
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This article explores the evolution of Principles of Biomedical Ethics by Tom Beauchamp and James Childress over its seven editions (1979–2013). Many changes have occurred in the text over the last thirty-five years, including the expansion of the section on virtue ethics, the modification of the authors’ position on physician-assisted suicide, and the addition of many other ethical theories to the original two (deontology and utilitarianism) found in the first editions. The basis for these changes and others seems to be their development of the theme of the “common morality.” The author suggests that Beauchamp and Childress develop the connection between their common morality and metaphysics, as it would serve to strengthen their theory and make it less susceptible to changes in society’s opinions and traditions. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 14.3 (Autumn 2014): 459–475.
30. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3
Medical Intervention in Cases of Maternal–Fetal Vital Conflicts: A Statement of Consensus
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This statement articulates a consensus of participants in a colloquium organized and sponsored by Ascension Health. The purpose was to consider what, if any, clinical interventions would be consistent with the Catholic moral tradition in the event that a woman’s life is threatened because her body is unable to adapt to the changes associated with pregnancy because of a preexisting pathology. An example is peripartum cardiomyopathy in pregnancy. The consensus is offered for evaluating the morality of medical interventions in such cases and as the basis for developing clinical guidelines consistent with Catholic teaching and the standard of care. The colloquium participants agree that induction before viability to eliminate a grave and present danger posed by a life-threatening condition resulting from the interaction of a normally functioning placenta with diseased organs of the mother can be consistent with Catholic Church teaching and the moral tradition. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 14.3 (Autumn 2014): 477–489.
31. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3
Jozef Laurinec Ethical Problems in the Use of Hormonal Contraception: An Investigation Based on Natural Law Theory and Virtue Ethics
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The development of hormonal contraception introduced a new era in medical practice, marked by the suppression of female fertility by interventions in the hormonal system. The interventions are very grave, as sex hormones are of existential importance both to preserve human life and to preserve the human species. This article conducts an ethical evaluation of the use of hormonal contraception through two ethical theories: natural law theory and virtue ethics. Based on philosophical reflection, the author examines what effects hormonal contraception has on primary goods and whether its use is congruent with the cardinal virtues. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 14.3 (Autumn 2014): 491–524.
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32. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3
“Aging and Disability”: Summary of the Twentieth Assembly Workshop
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notes & abstracts
33. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3
Rev. Nicanor Pier Giorgio Austriaco Science
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34. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3
Science Abstracts
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35. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3
Greg F. Burke, MD Medicine
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36. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3
Medicine Abstracts
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37. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3
Christopher Kaczor Philosophy and Theology
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38. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3
Philosophy and Theology Abstracts
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book reviews
39. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3
Rev. Richard Benson, CM The Law of Love: From Autonomy to Communion by Stephen F. Brett
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40. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 14 > Issue: 3
E. Christian Brugger Catholic Bioethics and the Gift of Human Life, 3rd edition by William E. May
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