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Displaying: 21-30 of 1554 documents


book reviews
21. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 4
James Beauregard Theological Neuroethics: Christian Ethics Meets the Science of the Human Brain
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22. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 4
Index to Volume 18
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23. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 3
Edward J. Furton In This Issue
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24. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 3
Elliott Louis Bedford Colloquy
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25. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 3
Greg Schleppenbach Washington Insider
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essays
26. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 3
Peter J. Colosi Discussing the Spiritual Soul in the Classroom
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There is a pedagogical method of bringing undergraduate students to conceive the body–soul question. Similarly, there is a simple philosophical argument in defense of the existence of the soul via contemporary autobiographical stories, recent neuroscientific literature, and Socrates’s distinction between condition and cause in Plato’s Phaedo. This method has proved helpful in enabling students to gain access to the mystery and grandeur of the body–soul question and its foundational importance with respect to ethics and, indeed, to the meaning of life. There must be a revival of collaboration between neuroscientists and philosophers to coauthor papers that explicitly challenge the materialist assumptions in the fields of neuroscience and psychology.
27. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 3
Joshua Evans The Mother’s Child as Aggressor: A Further Reply to Charles Camosy
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In a short section of his 2015 book Beyond the Abortion Wars, Charles Camosy claims that direct abortion to save the life of the mother is consistent with Catholic principles. Joshua Evans published an essay critical of this view in the Summer 2017 issue of the National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly, to which Camosy responded in the Summer 2018 issue. In the current essay, Evans replies to Camosy’s recent response by offering a further examination of three central issues in dispute: (1) how the history of moral theology bears on public debates, (2) how past authoritative Church teaching applies when the method of moral theology apparently has shifted, and (3) how the analysis of vital conflicts is affected when examined in relation to more fundamental theological considerations.
28. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 3
Trent Horn Abortion and Good Samaritan Arguments
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Some defenders of legal abortion claim that even if the human fetus is a human being with the same right to life as an adult, abortion is not necessarily morally impermissible. They argue that abortion can be considered a form of indirect killing that results from the refusal to provide life support through one’s own body, which another person has no right to receive. While Catholic moral theology does not require people to donate organs against their will, this principle does not justify direct abortion.
29. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 3
Divya Joshi, Dwight Stapleton The Influence of Spiritual Retreats on Compassion in Health Care
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Our moral compass is not the only thing that compels us to provide compassionate health care, which also improves patient outcomes and patient and provider satisfaction. In the current era of increasing medical complexity, provider burnout, and value-based reimbursement, health care systems struggle to durably improve their providers’ compassion in the provision of care. A religious retreat curriculum for leaders at OSF HealthCare, in Illinois and Michigan, has led to a significant, long-term increase among employees in their compassion toward patients, colleagues, and self.
articles
30. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 18 > Issue: 3
Mary Beth Phillips The False Freedom of Promiscuity: Consequences of Teenage Sexual Activity
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Teenagers enjoy better physical and mental health when they avoid early sexual debut and reserve the sexual act for marriage. Teens who initiate sexual relations outside of marriage risk contracting sexually transmitted diseases, and those who also use hormonal contraception to avoid pregnancy often suffer unwanted physical and emotional side effects. Teens who have multiple partners may have later attachment or bonding difficulties. The consequences of an unintended pregnancy after a casual sexual relationship are often abortion or single motherhood and an increased likelihood of poverty. Teenagers who save sexual relations for marriage experience freedom from these negative consequences and are more likely, in marriage, to experience the beauty of self-giving love.