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Displaying: 21-30 of 3861 documents


book reviews
21. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 59 > Issue: 3
Gary M. Gurtler, S.J. Plotinus on the Soul. By Damian Caluori
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22. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 59 > Issue: 3
John D. Gilroy, Jr. Experiencing William James: Belief in a Pluralistic World. By James Campbell
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23. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 59 > Issue: 3
Samuel A. Stoner Kant and His German Contemporaries. Edited by Daniel O. Dahlstrom
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24. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 59 > Issue: 3
Joseph W. Koterski, S.J. The Naturalistic Fallacy. Edited by Neil Sinclair
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25. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 59 > Issue: 3
Books Received
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26. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 59 > Issue: 2
About Our Contributors
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articles
27. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 59 > Issue: 2
Roberto Mordacci A Short History and Theory of Respect
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It has become common, following Stephen Darwall’s “Two Kinds of Respect” (1977), to distinguish between “appraisal respect” and “recognition respect.” I propose, rather, to distinguish between hierarchical and egalitarian respect. The way the two meanings interact and the way they either support or contrast with each other have yet to be made clear. The meanings gathered under the broad rubric of respect can be highlighted by a genealogy that convincingly shows that the hierarchical notion is fundamental and that the definition of an egalitarian meaning is a decisive shift made mainly by the Enlightenment movement, particularly by Kant. Furthermore, the notion of respect is currently being extended beyond persons—to animals, other living beings, and the environment. I argue that we can justifiably do so on the basis of the interaction between the hierarchical and egalitarian notions of respect.
28. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 59 > Issue: 2
Anthony Rudd On Painting and its Philosophical Significance: Merleau-Ponty and Maritain
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Merleau-Ponty’s writings on the philosophy of painting, though widely influential and much discussed, remain enigmatic. In this paper I compare his views on painting with those of his older contemporary, Jacques Maritain, who also holds that painting can give us a non-conceptual insight into deep truths about things that are inaccessible to discursive thought. I argue that some ideas that are obscure and undeveloped in Merleau-Ponty are developed more clearly and fully in Maritain. Even where there are significant differences between them, these are not as great as it might at first seem. This comparison can help us to see the ways in which both philosophers’ theories of art are important for understanding their philosophies as a whole. Furthermore, the views they hold in common can continue to suggest a plausible and fruitful way to think about art today.
29. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 59 > Issue: 2
Daniel Adsett Milbank and Heidegger on the Possibility of a Secular Analogy of Being
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Traditionally, analogical ontologies—ontologies that are hierarchically structured with beings participating in a primary being—have been defended by those who criticize secularism. Secularism, it is said, depends on the leveling out of being, the elimination of hierarchies in favor of ontologies in which beings differ only according to intensity. John Milbank, for example, argues that secularism became a possibility only once medieval analogical ontologies were supplanted by univocal accounts of being. In this paper, however, I argue that an endorsement of an analogical ontology is not restricted to pre-moderns and those critical of secularism. It is possible, I argue, to conceive of a secular version of analogical ontology. Martin Heidegger’s mid-career account of being offers us an example of such an ontology. In what follows, I attempt to reconstruct Heidegger’s mid-career ontology as analogically and secularly organized. In doing so, I challenge Milbank’s claim that secular ontologies are necessarily non-analogical.
30. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 59 > Issue: 2
Yong Li Virtues and Human Dignity: Confucianism and the Foundation of Human Rights
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In this paper I argue that Confucianism provides a foundation for human rights. First, I will survey the current debates on the issue of whether Confucianism can embrace the idea of human rights. Second, I will focus on a “thin concept” of human rights and point out some historical developments pertinent to this idea and various aspects of the concept. Third, I will explain the type of interpretation of Confucianism on which I want to focus. Fourth, I will argue that Confucianism is not only compatible with human rights but also provides a foundation for human dignity, which is a basis for human rights. I argue that the Confucian virtue-based approach can overcome certain challenges that thwart an autonomy-based approach to human dignity and human rights. Finally, I will address some objections to this view.