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Displaying: 21-26 of 26 documents


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21. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 25 > Issue: 1
Stephen Kershnar For Permitting Hazing
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In this essay, I argue that colleges and universities should permit hazing. I argue that if hazing is wrong, then it wrongs someone and if it wrongs someone then it violates someone’s right. Hazing does not violate someone’s right when the person who is hazed gives informed consent. I then argue that because hazing is permissible, colleges should permit it. I consider and respond to objections that hazing is wrong for reasons that are not right-based. Here I consider objections relating to deception, coercion, unnecessary harm, degradation, and exploitation. I also consider two more objections. First, hazing is wrong because it violates the colleges’ rights. Second, colleges need not permit hazing because they own the rights to the groups or the materials that the groups use and hence they may exercise their property rights in such a way as to make hazing wrong.
symposium on stoic counseling
22. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 25 > Issue: 1
William Ferraiolo Stoic Anxiolytics
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We experience anxiety because things may not turn out as we wish. Perhaps the problem is not located in the unfolding of events, but rather in the nature of the wishing. In this paper, I will argue that the Roman Stoics correctly analyzed the necessary conditions surrounding the arising of anxiety, and offered an effective prescription for the treatment and prevention of this disordered emotional state—a prescription that does not involve benzodiazepines such as Valium or Xanax, but one that holds out the promise of a more stable and enduring anxiolytic effect. Ultimately, anxiety can afflict only those whose desires are not rationally governed. There is little that anyone can do about the vicissitudes of the external world and the unraveling of events therein, but there is a great deal thata rational agent can do to manage the objects and direction of desire and aversion. Though not dispensed in tablet or capsule form, Stoic anxiolytics remain available without prescription and exhibit an extraordinarily benign side effect profile. They rarely cause weight gain, sexual dysfunction, or uncontrollable movements of the limbs. Physiological dependence is relatively rare—and not especially pernicious. Instead, Stoicism offers rationally grounded, proven psychological techniques for the gradual development of consistent self-mastery and emotional detachment from those facets of the human condition that tend to cause the most pervasive and unsettling forms of fear, anxiety, and avoidable disquiet.
23. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 25 > Issue: 1
James Stacey Taylor Stoic Anxiolytics Revisited
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24. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 25 > Issue: 1
William Ferraiolo Stoic “Harm” as Degradation: A Response to James Taylor
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book review
25. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 25 > Issue: 1
Fabrice Jotterand From Nanoscience to Nanoethics: How Should we Proceed?
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26. International Journal of Applied Philosophy: Volume > 25 > Issue: 1
About the Contributors
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