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Displaying: 21-40 of 78 documents


book reviews
21. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 8
Emily Gillcrist Katherine Withy’s Heidegger on Being Uncanny
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22. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 8
Rodrigo Bueno Therezo Geoffrey Bennington’s Scatter 1
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23. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 8
Texts of Heidegger cited and abbreviations used
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24. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 7
Peter Trawny Heidegger’s Legacy
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25. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 7
John Sallis The Negativity of Time-Space
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26. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 7
Peter Hanly Heidegger’s Birth
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27. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 7
Daniela Vallega-Neu Attunements, Truth, and Errancy in Heidegger’s Thinking
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28. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 7
Marcia Sá Cavalcante Schuback Being Without (Heidegger)
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29. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 7
Scott M. Campbell The Catastrophic Essence of the Human Being in Heidegger’s Readings of Antigone
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30. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 7
Jessica S. Elkayam “...And the Whole Music Box Repeats Eternally Its Tune...”
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31. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 7
Rebecca A. Longtin Heidegger and the Poetics of Time
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Heidegger’s engagement with the poet Friedrich Hölderlin often dwells on the issue of temporality. For Heidegger, Hölderlin is the most futural thinker (zukünftigster Denker) whose poetry is necessary for us now and must be wrested from being buried in the past. Heidegger frames his reading of Hölderlin in terms of past, present, and future and, more importantly, describes him as being able to poetize time. This paper examines what it means to poetize time and why Hölderlin’s poetry in particular allows us to understand temporality as the interplay of presence and non-presence.
32. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 7
Julia A. Ireland Heidegger’s Hausfreund and the Re-Enchantment of the Familiar
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33. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 7
Robert Bernasconi Being is Evil: Boehme’s Strife and Schelling’s Rage in Heidegger’s “Letter on ‘Humanism’”
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book review
34. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 7
Wayne J. Froman Dominique Janicaud’s Heidegger in France
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35. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 7
Texts of Heidegger cited and abbreviations used
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36. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 6
Lawrence J. Hatab The Point of Language in Heidegger’s Thinking: A Call for the Revival of Formal Indication
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37. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 6
Derek Aggleton The Disunity of Factical Life: An Ethical Development in Heidegger’s Early Work
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38. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 6
Ryan Johnson Thinking the Abyss of History: Heidegger’s Critique of Hegelian Metaphysics
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39. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 6
Timothy Sean Quinn Heidegger and Jünger: Nihilism and the Fate of Europe
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In the 1930s, Martin Heidegger began what would become a lifelong engagement with the work of Ernst Jünger. Part of Heidegger’s interest in Jünger was a result of Jünger’s Nietzsche-inspired cultural diagnosis; in Heidegger’s words, Jünger “makes all previous writings about Nietzsche inessential.” On the other hand, Heidegger was critical of what he deemed Jünger’s “bedazzlement” before the thought of Nietzsche. In this essay, I explore the sources of Heidegger’s interest and his criticism of Jünger’s work. To do this, I focus on elements of their correspondence, but mainly on Jünger’s essay “Über die Linie” of 1950 and Heidegger’s response, “Über ‘die Linie’” of 1955. In so doing, I hope to uncover their shared concern for the fate of Europe at the hands of a nihilism of which World War II was, to them, but an expression.
40. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 6
Krzysztof Ziarek On Heidegger’s Einmaligkeit Again: The Single Turn of the Event
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