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Dialogue and Universalism

Volume 24
The Experience of Animality

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Displaying: 21-40 of 101 documents


ways of philosophy
21. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Marc Lucht Philosophy as a Way of Living
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Oriented by the philosophical work of Kant and Heidegger, this paper reflects upon some of the ways in which philosophy can inform every day living. First briefly sketching some of the connections between philosophical practice and the cultivation of autonomy, critical rationality, personal responsibility, and attitudes conducive of peace, this paper then turns to the capacity for philosophical contemplation to enrich a life by cultivating sensitivity and attentiveness to meaning and inherent worth.
22. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Vladimir Przhilenskiy Suspicion and Method: Towards the Post-Theoretical Lifeworld
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The article analyzes the historical and philosophical roots of the art of suspicion and its role in the development of modern philosophy and its method. Particular attention is paid to the issues of the comparison of philosophical suspicion and conspiracy theories as a special state of mass consciousness. The article also specifies the dependence of the art of suspicion on the sociology of knowledge and post-theoretical thinking.
23. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Panos Eliopoulos The Stoic Cosmopolitanism as a Way of Life
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The word cosmopolitanism is derived from “cosmos” (universe) and “polites” (citizen). The cosmopolite is a citizen of the world. The Stoics elaborate on the theme, using the ideas of oikeiosis and sympathy as its basis, thus drawing from their physics. Particularly, Epictetus defends cosmopolitanism on the assumption that man is akin to God, whereas Marcus Aurelius highlights the common possession of mind (νοῦς) and that man is by nature able for communal life. For the Stoics man is a social being who can be perfected only within the society of other human beings. The brotherhood of men is grounded on the indubitable axiom that the human soul is the source of the unique good, which is virtue. The distinctive parameter for creating a community is virtue, which is an objective for everyone but also an inherent and ecumenical capacity.
24. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
German V. Melikhov On the Unrestraint in Beliefs
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This article studies the unrestraint in beliefs associated with the overemphasizing of our beliefs. The author argues that the intolerance for other points of view appears (among other factors) because of a naively-objectivist understanding of philosophy, one which is based on two assumptions: first, philosophy is considered only as a theory and not an individual practice, not an experience, and second, the truth is considered as identical to a certain ideal-objective content that can be in one’s possession.There are true ideas and proper words. If we learn these ideas, we will definitely seize the truth. The author opposes this understanding the notion of philosophy which is based on the experience of the encounter and upon reflexive comprehension of this experience. It is possible to minimize unrestraint in beliefs if we assume that all the points of view including our own are considered as belonging to the incomprehensible Absolute.
25. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Tatiana M. Shatunova Aesthetics as Metaphysics and Passion
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Philosophy is an inquiry and way of life. Is it possible to apply this formula to aesthetics? There is no doubt that aesthetics is always an investigation, a questioning. However, is it possible to speak about aesthetics as a way of life, too? To answer this question, it is necessary to understand what happens in aesthetic theory today, or rather, what is contemporary aesthetics of today.
26. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Igor Gasparov Spiritual Exercises as an Essential Part of Philosophical Life
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In my paper I will argue for the thesis that spiritual exercises are an essential part of every philosophical life. My arguments are partly historical, partly conceptual in their nature. First, I show that philosophy at each stage of its history was accompanied by spiritual exercises. Next, I provide a definition of spiritual exercises as genuinely philosophical activity. Then I show that the philosophical life cannot be complete if it does not include spiritual exercises.
27. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Elena N. Bolotnikova Philosophy as Self-Care
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This article states that the search for the meaning of life is possible only through an address to non-existence, and it is a sign of genuine human self-care. Religion and philosophy are considered as incarnation of the space of care. Philosophy here is understood in a broad sense, not as a rigorous science, but as search for wisdom. Based on the structure of self-care, given in Michel Foucault’s works, here are revealed peculiarities of the search for the meaning of life in respective fields. This also implies different lifestyles. The author believes that genuine self-care is available to everyone, in spite of the nature of modern mass culture.
philosophy on being
28. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Aleksey N. Fatenkov Realistic Strategy in Comprehending Being
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The article deals with the category of sense. It examines the meaningfulness of the absurd and takes realism to be a basic strategy in comprehending being. This strategy is compared with constructivism and reflection, or correspondence (copy) theory.
29. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Mikhail M. Prokhorov The Unity of Being and History as a Principle of Ontology, Gnoseology and Epistemology
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The principle of unity, interrelation of being and history is viewed here as a principle of ontology, gnoseology and epistemology, as a basis of updating philosophical outlooks, especially the problem of man and his relationship to the world (world-attitude). It is shown that consciousness was been interpreted in the context of a specific type of relations of man to the world. To overcome subjectivism a deep sense of objectivity of being and its development in relation to man is restored. A three-tier definition of being is given: substantive, attributive, and properly historical. The relationship of human activity to being and its development is explicated.
30. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Nathan M. Solodukho Situationality of Being: Principles
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In this paper, the author-developed conception of the “situationality of being,” i.e. the extension of the theory of the “philosophy of nonbeing,” is presented; the generalized definition of the notion “situation” is formulated; and the essence of the “situationality of being” is explained. The conception of the “situationality of being” makes it possible to develop the situational pattern of the world; in accordance with this conception, “the world is the situation of situations,” The world appears before us in the form of one gigantic situation due to the interaction of various situational factors of different level and different qualities, which lead in the long run to a certain situative dynamic balance (the so-called existent world).
philosophy on cognition
31. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Emiliya A. Tajsina An Advance to a New Theory of Cognition
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The theory suggested in the article is revealed in terms of existential materialism finding its source in Aristotle’s maxim that philosophy is a study of the essential unity of the grounds of being and consciousness. This theory still makes use of the old principle of reflection postulating the subject/object dyad. The here-proposed theory points out that there is not really a dyad, but a triad of a cognitive relationship: subject–language-object. To cope with the main epistemological problem of truth, we postulate that not only the paradigmatic, but also the syntagmatic axis be considered. The basic syntagma of gnoseology is contemplation on the absolute and relative in true knowledge, but not in a Hegelian way.
32. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Tatyana G. Leshkevich Major Directions of the Analysis of Epistemological Instruments
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The article examines the research of the innovative-oriented scenarios in modern methodology. The innovative-oriented epistemological instruments indicate an opposition between determinism and sociocultural constructivism. Methodology is understood in the context of the technology of activity which is projected onto the innovation sphere in the context of their genesis, adaptability, spread and consumption. The article conceptually analyses epistemological instruments; it considers positive and negative tendencies relating to NIBC (nano-, bio-, info-, cognitive) technologies. The author claims that the modern image of the world includes the sum of technologies which determine the world; the image of the possible future can be called “post-human.”
33. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Shane Ryan The Value of Knowledge
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In this paper I make the case that we should reject an argument that even knowledge of pointless truths has pro tanto final value. The argument draws on Greco’s virtue epistemological account of knowledge, according to which knowledge is an achievement and achievements have final value in virtue of being constitutive of the good life. I argue for my position by drawing on a case of knowledge of a pointless truth unlike previous cases of pointless truths discussed in the literature. This is a case in which knowledge of a pointless truth is very cheaply gained, and so it is a case in which the disvalue of the cost of gaining the knowledge cannot plausibly outweigh the supposed pro tanto final value of knowledge.
34. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Artur Karimov Analyticity and Modality
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In this paper I defend the concept of metaphysical analyticity, and argue for the notion of analyticity as truth in virtue of the reference determiner, introduced by Gillian K. Russell. Contrary to Russell, I try to show that necessary a posteriori statements are analytic under this notion. Also, I maintain that contingent a priori statements cannot be properly called analytic.
35. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Evgeniy Bubnov Truth in Religion, Science, and Postmodernism
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In this paper different approaches to the concept of truth are compared. Many changes in the concept of truth result in making it a zero notion. Similar processes are described in Max Müller’s conception of the genesis of religion. In this respect we suggest that postmodern philosophy should be treated as a new mythology.
36. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Timur N. Khalitov Sophistics and Its Modern Reading
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Whatever the theory of knowledge may be—classical, non-classical, or post-non-classical, idealistic or materialistic, dialectical or metaphysical—its core is always the question: “Is there absolute truth?” (which I doubt)—because I am (absolutely) convinced that there is relative truth, for it is obvious. In the last few decades post-non-classical views on truth, namely, relativistic have triumphed. Nowadays we witness a renaissance of theoretical paradoxes of sophistry that can lead, and often do lead to real social misfortunes. To avoid them, one has to consider how it all began in the times of classical ancient Greek philosophy. Such exploration is the aim of the present paper.
37. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Adel Ivanova, Valentin Pukhlikov The Heuristic and Methodological Potential of the Concept “Scientific Revolution”
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The concept of revolution in science is widely used in philosophy of science. We believe that the concept of revolution was borrowed from social-political literature and without any philosophical analysis was transferred to history of science. For this reason, attempts to transform that concept into an efficient instrument of building a theory of the development of scientific knowledge cannot be successful. This concept is nothing more than a metaphor for emphasizing empirical and theoretical discoveries of great significance in the history of science.
38. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Roman S. Kljujkov, Sergey F. Kljujkov Plato’s Philosophy of Cognition by Mathematical Modelling
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By the end of his life Plato had rearranged the theory of ideas into his teaching about ideal numbers, but no written records have been left. The Ideal mathematics of Plato is present in all his dialogues. It can be clearly grasped in relation to the effective use of mathematical modelling. Many problems of mathematical modelling were laid in the foundation of the method by cutting the three-level idealism of Plato to the single-level “ideism” of Aristotle. For a long time, the real, ideal numbers of Plato’s Ideal mathematics eliminates many mathematical problems, extends the capabilities of modelling, and improves mathematics.
philosophy on man, culture and social reality
39. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Mustafa I. Bilalov Ethnic Specification of Truth Interpretation
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The article examines the idea of constructing a truth theory that is ethnic and cognitive culture specific. To this task I use the hypothesis of ethnic and scientific mind. The substance and specifications of different ethnic minds and cognitive cultures are here described. According to the proposed conception, standard theories of truth are revised: correspondence, coherent, pragmatic, etc.
40. Dialogue and Universalism: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Alsu F. Valeeva A Linguistic Paradigm of Ethnoreligious Traditions
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This article deals with the most significant versions of the confessional factor, acting in modern Russian society as a cultural resource of international consent. Analyzing the problem of confessional tolerance, the author traces the reflection of supporting religious values in communicative-speech space of the renewed society.