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Displaying: 161-180 of 426 documents


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161. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 9 > Issue: 1
Cyril O'Regan John Henry Newman and the Argument of Holiness
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This essay examines Newman’s life-long campaign against the errors of liberal religion, particularly its “anti-holiness” principle that rejects the Christian commitment to the pursuit of sanctity. In both his Anglican and Roman Catholic writings, Newman attacked the “anti-holiness” principle’s underlying presuppositions, particularly (1) its naturalistic anthropology, (2) its “anthropocentric horizon of discourse,” (3) its rejection of ascetic discipline in religious formation, and (4) its tendency to accept uncritically what is intellectually novel.
review essay
162. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 9 > Issue: 1
Donald G. Graham Frank Turner on John Henry Newman and Development: An Example of Eisegesis
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The late Frank M. Turner’s revisionist biography, John Henry Newman: The Challenge to Evangelical Religion has caused controversy. This essay considers one of Turner’s controversial contentions, namely, that Newman’s Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine (1845) is a naturalistic account of the history of the Christian church—an account devoid of the presence of Providence.
book reviews
163. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 9 > Issue: 1
Todd C. Ream Saving Wisdom: Theology in the Christian University
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164. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 9 > Issue: 1
Bernadette Waterman Ward G. K. Chesterton: A Biography
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165. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 9 > Issue: 1
Charles Hefling Newman and the Alexandrian Fathers: Shaping Doctrine in Nineteenth-Century England
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166. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 9 > Issue: 1
Daniel B. Gallagher John Henry Newman on the Nature of the Mind: Reason in Religion, Science, and the Humanities
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167. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 9 > Issue: 1
Sister Marie Colette Roy, OSF Elizabeth Hayes: Pioneer Franciscan Journalist
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168. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 9 > Issue: 1
Edward J. Enright, O.S.A. Samuel Taylor Coleridge and the Anglican Church
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169. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 9 > Issue: 1
Newman Bibliography - General Resources
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170. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 9 > Issue: 1
John Henry Newman: A Brief Chronology
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171. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 9 > Issue: 1
NINS Update
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172. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 8 > Issue: 2
John T. Ford, C.S.C. Editorial Preface
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articles
173. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 8 > Issue: 2
Ono Ekeh Newman’s Account of Ambrose St. John’s Death
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Both Ambrose St. John (1815–1875) and John Henry Newman (1801–1890), who were received into the Roman Catholic Church in 1845, became members of the Birmingham Oratory. Newman’s closest companion for over three decades, St. John’s death was extremely painful for Newman, not only because it was unexpected, but because of his devotion to Newman as well as his dedication to his spiritual duties. Along with presenting Newman’s narrative of the last few weeks of St. John’s life, this essay raises the question: why did Newman write this “account.”
174. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 8 > Issue: 2
Edward Jeremy Miller John Henry Newman’s Idea of Alma Mater
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Why is a college or university called an alma mater? This essay looks to Newman for an answer, first by pointing out his love for Trinity College, Oxford, his undergraduate alma mater. The author, sharing his experience of Louvain as his alma mater, emphasizes that an alma mater is not a theoretical concept, but a matter of real apprehension. This essay then examines two sources where Newman discussed the Catholic University of Ireland as an alma mater: his inaugural university sermon, where he insisted that the university must be a mother to its students; and his first annual report to the Irish bishops, where he emphasized that the students’ resident life must provide a sense of community and a love for their alma mater. In sum, if a university is truly to be a “nourishing mother,” she must provide her students not only with an intellectual education, but also with moral discipline.
175. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 8 > Issue: 2
Stephen Kelly John Henry Newman and the Writing of History
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Can Newman be classified as an “historian”? On the one hand, Newman did not adhere to, indeed cared very little for, modern scientific methods of empirical research; he detested the cold, clinical nature of German intellectualism of the mid-ninetheenth century. On the other hand, Newman’s historical investigation relied upon conservative methods of historical research: the use of original sources and the rules of historical criticism; his techniques were self-taught, but they were adequate to meet the historical standards of his times. Most importantly, Newman never conceived of himself purely and simply as an historian: he studied history in the service of religion and, for example, examined the fourth century in order to provide answers to the theological questions of the nineteenth.
176. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 8 > Issue: 2
Andrew Denton John Henry Newman’s Anagnorisis of 1839: Lessons from Augustine, Tyconius, and the Donatist and Monophysite Controversies
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In a well-known passage in his Apologia, Newman’s recognition of himself as a latter-day Monophysite marked a pivotal step towards his conversion. This recognition, however, was preceded by another painful anagnorisis: his realization, as a result of a stinging article by Nicholas Wiseman, that he was a latter-day Donatist. This essay examines how Wiseman’s article exposed Newman’s ecclesial ambivalence and highlights the role that St. Augustine’s writings played, not only in confirming Newman’s schismatic identity, but also in ultimately suggesting how to move beyond it.
177. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 8 > Issue: 2
Ryan Vilbig John Henry Newman’s View of the “Darwin Theory”
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John Henry Newman (1801–1890) is well known for An Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine (1845), while Charles Darwin (1809–1882) is famous for On the Origin of Species (1859). Although many Victorian theologians and ecclesiastics attacked Darwin’s theory of evolution, this essay shows that Newman considered evolution compatible with Christianity.
178. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 8 > Issue: 2
Danielle Nussberger John Henry Newman’s Art of Communicating Christian Faith
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Newman was a profoundly skilled communicator of Christian faith who provides a model for an efficacious elucidation of the doctrinal content and transformative power of Christianity. His exemplarity resides in his three-dimensional approach to theological communication: (1) the communicator’s personal investment in faith’s import; (2) faith’s threefold nature that includes its doctrinal content, its demand for personal involvement, and its reasonableness; and (3) the audience’s active contribution to the process of faith-transmission. Although repeated emphasis upon subjective commitment goes against the modern penchant for objectivity, it is precisely this subjective component, which requires open minds and open hearts, that plays a decisive role in the concomitant adherence to the objective reality and reliability of faith’s wisdom.
newman’s writings
179. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 8 > Issue: 2
Robert C. Christie Life’s Purpose: Wisdom From John Henry Newman
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180. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 8 > Issue: 2
Edward Jeremy Miller John Henry Newman, Sermons Preached on Various Occasions
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