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Displaying: 121-140 of 426 documents


121. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
John T. Ford, c.s.c. “Alas! What are we doing all through life, both as a necessity and as a duty, but unlearning the world’s poetry, and attaining to its prose!”
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articles
122. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
M. Katherine Tillman John Henry Newman: Worldly Wisdom and Holy Wisdom
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After considering the meaning of “wisdom” in the Hellenic and Semitic Traditions, this essay examines Newman’s views about “worldly wisdom” in both a practical and a philosophical sense and then considers “holy wisdom” as contemplative and transcendent.
123. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Brendan Case “Notions” and “Things” in John Henry Newman’s Grammar of Assent
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In discussing apprehension, assent, and inference in his Grammar of Assent, Newman contrasted “notions” and “things”—terms that distinguish knowledge of the abstract and “unreal” from knowledge of the singular and concrete. This essay proposes that Newman’s contrast between “notions” and “things” is an adverbial distinction, qualifying a person’s mode of engagement with the world, rather than an adjectival distinction, qualifying the metaphysical status of particular terms.
124. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
C. Michael Shea The “French Newman”: Louis Bautain’s Philosophy of Faith, Reason, and Development and the Thought of John Henry Newman
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Louis Bautain (1796–1867) has been described as the “French Newman” because of the resemblances between their lives and writings. This essay compares three aspects of the thought of Newman and Bautain: their respective understanding of faith, reason, and development. Both thinkers understood faith and reason in relation to conversion and the realities of life and viewed faith and reason as functioning in tandem with doctrinal development.
125. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
John T. Ford Johh Henry Newman: Conversion as Inference
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This essay examines the complementarity between Newman’s Apologia pro Vita Sua (1864), which provided an autobiographical account of his conversions, and his Grammar of Assent (1870), which described three types of inference—formal, natural, informal—that provide three paradigms for different types of religious conversion.
word studies
126. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Edward Jeremy Miller The Church "Superintends" The University "What, Then, Does Dr. Newman Mean"?
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This word study, prompted by Newman’s statement that the church “superintends” the university, indicates that Newman, both as an Anglican and as a Roman Catholic, used “superintend” and its cognates in a variety of contexts: educational and ecclesiastical, theological and epistemological, as well as personal and parental.
archival studies
127. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Stephen Kelly A History of John Henry Newman's Archival Papers
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This study traces the history of Newman’s personal papers that are archived at the Birmingham Oratory. Newman was the “master archivist” who spent considerable time during the last two decades of his life in assembling his papers. Subsequently, three major catalogues of Newman’s papers were prepared: the first began in 1920, under the supervision of Richard Garnett Bellasis and Henry Lewis Bellasis; a second catalogue was compiled in the mid-1950s by Yale University Library for microfilming Newman’s papers; the third catalogue was compiled by Gerard Tracey in 1980.
sermon studies
128. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Geertjan Zuijdwegt Richard Whately’s Influence On John Henry Newman’s Oxford University Sermons On Faith And Reason (1839–1840)
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In 1839 and 1840, Newman preached four Oxford University Sermons, which critiqued the evidential apologetics advocated by John Locke (1632-1704) and William Paley (1743-1805) and subsequently restated by Richard Whately (1787-1863). In response, Newman drew upon Whately’s earlier works on logic and rhetoric to develop an alternative account of the reasonableness of religious belief that was based on implicit reasoning from antecedent probabilities. Newman’s argument was a creative response to Whately’s contention that evidential reasoning is the only safeguard against superstition and infidelity.
book reviews
129. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Phillip R. Sloan Charles M. Woolf: Darwin, Darwinism, and Uncertainty
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130. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
John Henry Newman: A Brief Chronology
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131. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
Newman Bibliography – General Resources
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132. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 10 > Issue: 1
NINS Update
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133. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 9 > Issue: 2
W. J. Copeland Newman’s Parochial and Plain Sermons “Found a Response in the Hearts and Minds and Consciences of Those to Whom They Were Addressed.”
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articles
134. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 9 > Issue: 2
Ryan McDermott John Henry Newman and the Oratory School Latin Plays
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This essay describes Newman’s adaptations of plays by Plautus (c. 254–184 BC) and Terence (195/185–159 BC) for performance at the Birmingham Oratory School. Because Newman believed in the value of Latin plays for students, he expended a great deal of energy on their adaptation and production while carefully editing the plays to omit any questionable content.
135. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 9 > Issue: 2
Ryan Vilbig John Henry Newman and Empiricism
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John Henry Newman (1801–1890) was deeply influenced by the British empiricist school of the eighteenth century, particularly by the philosophy of David Hume(1711–1776). Though frequently disputing Hume’s conclusions, Newman nevertheless worked to develop a theistic form of empiricism that integrated the developing scientific worldview with traditional Christian philosophy. In light of recently renewed interest in Hume, this essay first explores Newman’s empiricist leanings and then proposes that his distinctive philosophy can contribute to modern discussions about the relationship of science and religion.
136. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 9 > Issue: 2
Kei Uno John Henry Newman’s Educational Ideas in Japan
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John Henry Newman’s educational ideas, which first became known in Japan before the Pacific War, continue to attract followers, especially as a result of the foundation of the Newman Society of Japan in 1983. However, this interest in Newman has had mixed results: on the one hand, some Japanese secular scholars who have tried to adopt Newman’s educational ideas to Japanese higher education do not seem interested in Catholicism. On the other hand, some post-war educational ideas of Japanese Catholics seem incompatible with Newman’s spirituality and thought.
sermon studies
137. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 9 > Issue: 2
Dominic Pigneri John Henry Newman’s Whitehall Preachership of 1828: “Christmas day what a nuisance!”
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Newman was offered a preachership at Whitehall Chapel in London for the second part of December; he accepted the invitation, even though he anticipated that the task would be “a bore.” Unfortunately for Newman, his experience turned out to be more burdensome than he had expected; the result was a very frustrating Christmas.
138. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 9 > Issue: 2
Marcin Kuczok The Christian Life as War in John Henry Newman’s Parochial and Plain Sermons (1834–1843)
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Among the various descriptions of the Christian life in Newman’s Parochial and Plain Sermons (1834–1843), the metaphor of war is prominent. This essay examines Newman’s extensive use of the metaphor of war from the viewpoint of cognitive semantics, which assumes that transcendental reality can only be conceived of and described in language that uses such conceptual mechanisms as image schemata, metaphor, metonymy, and conceptual blending. Analyzing the conceptual phenomena inherent in the metaphor of war provides both a better understanding of Newman’s Parochial and Plain Sermons as well as a better appreciation of Newman’s understanding of the Christian life.
139. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 9 > Issue: 2
Joshua Canzona John Henry Newman on Miracles and Skepticism
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In his sermon—“Miracles no Remedy for Unbelief” (2 May 1830)—Newman warned his audience that the lack of miracles often serves as an excuse for the true cause of unbelief: hardening the heart against the grace of God. What his audience presumably did not know was that Newman’s sermon reiterated an extended disagreement with his brother, Charles Robert Newman. Both the sermon and the sibling struggle over faith versus unbelief still provide enduring lessons for contemporary readers.
140. Newman Studies Journal: Volume > 9 > Issue: 2
Joseph Redfield Palmisano John Henry Newman’s Methodology for Theological Inquiry
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This essay proposes that Newman’s developmental methodology, as presented in his Fifteenth Oxford University Sermon, has a contemporary relevance for advancing insights into revelation by encouraging believers to engage with the theo-Logos. Since the word of God is embodied in doctrine and understood through symbol and ritual, doctrinal propositions should be considered “living ideas” which become embodied in the believer and so deepen the believer’s relationship with Christ and the community of believers through a liturgical symbolic order.