Cover of Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical
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Displaying: 101-120 of 1445 documents


on william h. poteat
101. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 1
Elon G. (Jerry) Eidenier Six Poems
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on epistemology
102. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 44 > Issue: 1
Mihály Héder, Daniel Paksi Non-Human Knowledge According to Michael Polanyi
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Three recent interpreters of tacit knowledge, Harald Grimen, Harry Collins, and John McDowell, either deny it is appropriate to attribute knowledge of any sort to animals or ignore the relevance of the tacit knowledge of animals to human knowledge. In this article, we seek to show that in Michael Polanyi’s understanding, tacit knowledge in animals underlies and supports human explicit knowledge. For Polanyi, tacit knowledge arises in increasingly complex forms in evolutionary history, and explicit knowledge emerges from it. Both forms of knowledge are personal achievements that can be true or false; animal behavior is not simply deterministic. Polanyi’s view on non-human tacit knowledge thus explains features of human knowledge that those denying or ignoring non-human knowledge leave unexplained.
journal and society information
103. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 43 > Issue: 3
Editorial Board and Submissions Guide
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104. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 43 > Issue: 3
Paul Lewis Preface
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journal and society information
105. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 43 > Issue: 3
Notes on Contributors
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engagements with retrieving realism by herbert dreyfus and charles taylor
106. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 43 > Issue: 3
John V. Apczynski A Polanyian Epistemology Manqué: Reflections on Retrieving Realism
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These reflections attempt to clarify and strengthen Dreyfus and Taylor’s defense of a realist understanding of knowing by comparing it to features of Michael Polanyi’s theory of personal knowledge. I believe this overcomes some ambiguities such as their use of “mediation” and strengthens their case in discussing science without recourse to the notion of a “view from nowhere.” These in turn provide a more robust understanding of their understanding of realism within a pluralist framework. For students of Polanyi’s thought, this comparative effort provides an opportunity to place Polanyi’s theory within the wider world of contemporary philosophical thinking that they bring to their exposition of a “contact” theory of knowing. This might provide a basis for developing Polanyi’s thought through these contemporary channels.
107. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 43 > Issue: 3
Esther L. Meek Contact with Reality: Comparing Michael Polanyi and Dreyfus and Taylor, Retrieving Realism
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This essay contrasts Michael Polanyi’s insight regarding contact with reality to the idea of direct contact theory that Hubert Dreyfus and Charles Taylor develop in their recent effort to “retrieve” realism. Whereas the latter locates a “direct” contact “beneath” articulation in a preconceptual layer “accessible only by phenomenology,” Polanyi locates contact in discovery—not beneath, but rather beyond, our efforts to know. It is also apparent that the authors of Retrieving Realism presume an epistemology less sophisticated than Polanyi’s subsidiary-focal integration, as well as omitting the critical epistemic component of commitment. The essay concludes that Polanyi offers the superior challenge to “the picture that held us captive”—Cartesian epistemology with its resultant anti-realism, one which additionally unleashes a lively, surprising real to its proper primacy.
108. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 43 > Issue: 3
David W. Rutledge Dreyfus, Taylor, and Polanyi’s Prescience
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Hubert Dreyfus and Charles Taylor argue explicit conceptual knowledge has an essential pre-conceptual “background” fully embedding the knower in the world. This refutes the Cartesian view that knowledge of the outside world is mediated through the mind of the observer. This “mediational” view is undermined by Kant, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, Wittgenstein, and Todes, and the “contact theory” they make possible. I add Polanyi to the list, as tacit knowing accomplishes similar things in better fashion.
109. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 43 > Issue: 3
Charles Lowney Robust Moral Realism: Pluralist or Emergent?
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In Retrieving Realism, Taylor and Dreyfus aim to correct mistaken modern assumptions and their post-modern reactions in order to affirm a robust realism about a world for scientific and moral exploration. Their critiques and solutions have much in common with Polanyi’s approach; they all emphasize tacit body-knowing, background frameworks, and our ability to develop epistemological structures that better and better grasp the world considered independent from us. Dreyfus-Taylor and Polanyi diverge, however, when it comes to choosing a framework from which to understand a robust moral realism. The former endorse a Heideggerian “reveal but conceal” pluralist approach, while a Polanyian view advocates a “progress but with risk” emergentist approach. I argue that the emergentist approach provides a better defense against deflationary realism and better reconciles apparent contradictions, such as physical causality and free will, engaged contact and progress in knowing reality in-itself, and cultural relativism and objective morality. While a pluralist account may have the strength of endorsing tolerance, it is more vulnerable to an ethical relativism; and while an emergentist view is more clearly at risk of illicit dogmatism, it has the strength of endorsing the search for moral truth that we all can share.
book reviews
110. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 43 > Issue: 3
Andrew Grosso The Language Animal: the Full Shape of the Human Linguistic Capacity
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111. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 43 > Issue: 3
Dale Cannon To Flourish or Destruct: A Personalist Theory of Human Goods and Motivation
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journal and society information
112. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 43 > Issue: 2
Editorial Board and Submissions Guide
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113. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 43 > Issue: 2
Paul Lewis Preface
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journal and society information
114. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 43 > Issue: 2
Notes on Contributors
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essays
115. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 43 > Issue: 2
Thomas Pfau The Failure of Charity and the Loss of Personhood: Beyond the Enlightenment Impasse
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Pfau elaborates the arguments he develops in Minding the Modern, and devotes particular attention to the question of the incommensurability of premodern and modern accounts of personhood and agency. He highlights the distinct nature of humanistic forms of inquiry (including history and theology) and examines their hermeneutic character, noting the priority of meaning over method. He emphasizes the interdependence of affection, volition, and cognition, and also analyzes varying descriptions of relationality. The article closes with a meditation on a section of T.S. Eliot’s Waste Land and the insights it provides to the themes mentioned in the essay.
116. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 43 > Issue: 2
Martin X. Moleski Restoring Faith in Reason: Thomas Pfau’s Defense of Humanistic Inquiry
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This article provides an appreciative but critical analysis of the account of humanistic inquiry Thomas Pfau develops in Minding the Modern. Moleski examines various complementary accounts of tacit knowing, and highlights the importance of assent, conscience, and tradition. He critiques Pfau’s account of objectivity, and argues perspectivalism and pluralism are not barriers to reliable knowledge of reality. He concludes with a cursory comparison of the efforts of Pfau, Newman, Polanyi, and Lonergan.
117. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 43 > Issue: 2
Philip Rolnick Person and Its Constellated Corollaries: Conversing with Thomas Pfau
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This essay explores the analysis of the concept of the person Thomas Pfau develops in Minding the Modern. Rolnick highlights the correspondence of the concepts of personhood and incommunicability, and also examines the relationship between personhood, intellect, and will. He further analyzes the correspondence between personhood, transcendence, and grace. He concludes with a question about Pfau’s reading of the history of modernity and the difference between formal and informal historical influences.
118. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 43 > Issue: 2
Martin E. Turkis II Robert Scholes: A Philosophically-Grounded Approach to English Pedagogy as Popular, Post-Critical Education
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Robert Scholes is a respected literary critic and semiotician who, motivated by dissatisfaction with the reigning epistemological assumptions in the field of literary theory, has advocated revamping the discipline of English in significant ways. Scholes’s own epistemology and semiotic approach to pedagogy cohere quite well with Polanyi’s epistemological work and are, in essence, post-critical. Given that far more students in the American educational system study English than philosophy, a wider embrace of Scholes’s pedagogical approach could provide more opportunities than are currently available to give students access to a post-critical formation. Scholes’s epistemology, semiotics, and pedagogy are discussed in some detail, and resonances with Polanyi’s grand project are highlighted.
book review
119. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 43 > Issue: 2
Andrew Grosso The Extended Self: Architecture, Memes, and Minds
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journal and society information
120. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 43 > Issue: 1
Editorial Board and Submissions Guide
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