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Displaying: 101-120 of 926 documents


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101. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 22
Richard Upsher Smith, Jr. Jacques Maritain’s “Integral Education”: Its Context, Content, and Feasibility Today (Part I)
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The purpose of this article is to provide the context of Jacques Maritain’s teaching about integral education, to sketch the content of integral education, and to examine the feasibility of integral education today. The argument will consider, in particular, Maritain’s books Integral Humanism and Education at the Crossroads, as well as his essays on education anthologized in The Education of Man.
102. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 22
Jerome C. Foss The Contemplative Mentality in Flannery O’Connor’s “Good Country People”
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Flannery O’Connor’s “Good Country People” offers readers a chance to better understand the shortcomings of modern political theory. The story makes explicit references to the modern thinkers Malebranche and Heidegger, both of whom sever philosophy from sensual reality. Hulga embraces these thinkers’ approach, but is unprepared for the con artist, Manly Pointer. Mrs. Hopewell accepts the ideas of early modernity without question, and is likewise deceived by Pointer. Mrs. Freeman, who relies on her senses, immediately recognizes deception. The story reflects O’Connor’s preference for a Thomistic approach to political thought that honors the senses and cultivates contemplative habits.
103. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 22
Joseph Zahn Josef Pieper on the Festival in Light of Culture
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The festival is an essential component of human cultural life. Amidst the emerging scholarship over the past century on the festival, we find that Josef Pieper provides a philosophical account of the festival accompanied by a sound account of the human person. This essay both reaffirms Pieper’s account of the festival and reintegrates his account within a larger context of culture. Fundamental to Pieper’s treatment is the human person’s power to love and be open to transcendence, without which true festivity is lost. In reintegrating Pieper’s account of festivity in light of a Dawsonian vision of culture, we find that the festival flows from the common vision of a people, that the change in a religious vision of culture results in the change of the festival, and that not just any shared vision of a people will engender a genuine festival.
104. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 22
Stephen Nakrosis History and Hagiography: Researching Modern Saints and Beatification
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Many people think of a “saint” as someone who lived centuries ago, failing to consider the possibility that there may be among their contemporaries people who the Church will one day canonize as saints. Yet there are researchers who are charged with the difficult task of investigating the lives of contemporary candidates for sainthood. Little has been written about the research methods employed by these investigators and scholars. For the most part, authors have written about dealing with ancient or medieval sources, or have attempted to explain hagiography from the perspective of sociology or psychiatry. This paper will examine some of the issues facing the researcher and writer who is exploring the lives of contemporary candidates for canonization, and will raise for consideration some of the challenges they face.
105. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 22
Charles Bellinger The Use of Historical Analogies in the Abortion Debate
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Pro-life and pro-choice advocates have both accused the other side of being similar to the defenders of slavery and/or Hitler. This essay seeks to clarify this debate by outlining the three main dimensions of reality as it is inhabited by human beings: the vertical axis (God and nature), the horizontal plane (sociality), and individual selfhood. These dimensions have corresponding political forms (monarchy, democracy, individualism) and they also serve to channel and rhetorically justify violence. “Re-enactment” is a better term than “analogy” when one understands that othering and violence are shape-shifting phenomena in human history.
106. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 22
Cynthia Nolan The Edward Snowden Case and the Morality of Secrecy
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When Edward Snowden decided in 2013 to hand over thousands of classified documents to reporters, he launched a firestorm of criticism aimed at both himself and the US National Security Agency. The NSA’s collection of metadata ended in 2015 as a direct result of Snowden’s revelations. He continues to leak classified documents from his political asylum in Russia. This article uses just war theory, theories of civil disobedience, and Church teaching on resistance to political authority to examine Snowden’s whistleblower decision. It applies the following categories of variables: moral order and the common good; virtue and rights; redress and subsidiarity; and success and proportionality.
107. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 22
Andrew Cummings The Habermas-Ratzinger Discussion Revisited: Translation as Epistemology
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In 2004 a much-publicized discussion took place between the political philosopher Jürgen Habermas and the Catholic theologian Joseph Ratzinger (the future Pope Benedict XVI). Essentially, the role of religion in the public sphere was at stake. Habermas, speaking of a “post-secular” age, attempted to find a more vocal place for religious views, subject to a “translation proviso.” Ratzinger, while acknowledging the need for better dialogue between the religious and the secular, argued that there was no longer a common basis for it in “natural reason.” Both figures can be seen as speaking to the practical and the theoretical aspects of the dialogue, respectively. Once this difference is understood, Habermas’s suggestions can be accepted.
108. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 22
Kieran Flanagan Postsecularism: Another Sociological Mirage?
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This review essay reflects on two works that pertain to the postsecular: Josef Bengtson, Explorations in Post-Secular Metaphysics (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016); and Florian Zemmin, Colin Jager, Guido Vanheeswijck, eds., Working with a Secular Age: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Charles Taylor’s Master Narrative (Berlin: de Gruyter, 2016). The profound influence of Charles Taylor's A Secular Age (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2007) is well illustrated in these two works under review. The review essay situates postsecularity in the context of debates on secularization and the sociological expectations this process generates. By treating postsecularism in terms of contextualisation, metaphysics arises as a default position pertaining to transcendence in Bengtson’s work. The efforts in the Zemmin, Jager, and Vanheeswijck work to steer the Taylor work in the direction of Islam are given a critical appraisal. A particular outcome of postsecularity is to render as untenable sociology’s customary detachment of religion from theology. Lastly, for Catholicism, postsecularism draws attention to a long-standing and long-denied crisis in the reproduction of belief in modernity and in a secularized Europe in particular. A singular exception to this crisis occurs in Scandinavian countries, notable for their absence of religion, which are experiencing a small, but significant renaissance of Catholicism. This opens out a positive side to debates on postsecularity which indicates that it is not solely about mirages which give comfort to secularized forms of sociology.
book reviews
109. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 22
Garrick Small Donald Boland, Economic Science and St. Thomas Aquinas: On Justice in the Distribution and Exchange of Wealth; E. Michael Jones, Barren Metal: A History of Capitalism as the Conflict Between Labor and Usury.
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110. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 22
Ronald J. Rychlak András Fejérdy, editor, The Vatican “Ostpolitik” 1958–1978: Responsibility and Witness during John XXIII and Paul VI
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111. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 22
Laurence Reardon Bruce P. Frohnen and George W. Carey, Constitutional Morality and the Rise of Quasi-Law
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112. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 22
Ryan J. Barilleaux James Hitchcock, Abortion, Religious Freedom, and Catholic Politics
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113. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 22
Kevin Schmiesing Thomas C. Leonard, Illiberal Reformers: Race, Eugenics, and American Economics in the Progressive Era
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114. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 22
David M. Klocek Yuval Levin, The Fractured Republic: Renewing America’s Social Contract in the Age of Individualism
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115. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 22
Kieran Flanagan Ivan Oliver, A Road to Rome: Walking in the Foothills of Catholicism
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116. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 22
J. Marianne Siegmund Colin Patterson, Chalcedonian Personalsim: Rethinking the Human
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117. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 22
Bruce Frohnen Ronald J. Rychlak, editor, American Law from a Catholic Perspective: Through a Clearer Lens
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118. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 22
Richard S. Myers John P. Safranek, The Myth of Liberalism
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119. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 22
Benjamin J. Brown Angus Sibley, Catholic Economics: Alternatives to the Jungle
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public and church affairs
120. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 22
Stephen M. Krason The "Benedict Option": Beware of the CPS
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This was one of SCSS President, Stephen M. Krason’s “Neither Left nor Right, but Catholic” columns that appear monthly at his blog site (https://skrason.wordpress.com/) and in Crisismagazine.com and The Wanderer. This column tells families and others proposing the “Benedict Option”—i.e., trying to separate as much from the secular culture as possible and trying to build up small Catholic subcultures where their children can be effectively reared in the Faith and family integrity preserved—to be attentive of the threat posed by the current child protective system and the need to seek to reform it.