Cover of Cultura International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology
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Displaying: 101-120 of 430 documents


101. Cultura International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Antonetta L. Bruno Italian food suits Korean women
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This paper analyses the attitudes of different genders and age groups toward Italian food in Korea. By asking who consumes it, and with whom, how, when, and why, this paper examines the cross-cultural meaning of Italian food and how it is differently perceived by men and women of different ages in Korea. It argues that Italian food is perceived by consumers as sharing female traits and that this, in turn, lends a particular eating experience.
102. Cultura International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Simon C. Estok The Semiotics of Garbage, East and West: A Case Study of A. R. Ammons and Choi Sung-ho
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This paper argues that garbage is no longer the site of contempt and fear and has become an object of profound theoretical investigation. The paper reviews some of the salient points in the growing body of theory about garbage and shows that if one thing has come out of this scholarship, it is that waste is both productive and dangerous, spent but agential, rejected but inescapable, and the intensity of disruptions of order potential in waste are immense. I show that two very different poems – one entitled “Above the Water, Under the Water” by South Korean poet Choi Sung-ho, the other entitled “Garbage” by American poet A.R. Ammons –reveal in very different ways both the agentic capacity of garbage and the ascension of garbage to a semiotics of the sublime in the twentieth century, East and West.
103. Cultura International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Kyung Han You Exploring Mandam [Comic Talk] as a Unique Form of Political Entertainment in Korea During the Japanese Colonial Period
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Using a lens of cultural industry approach, this study explores the rise and fall of the political entertainment with a focus on specific moments associated with the trajectory of Korean political entertainment in public setting. A historical overview of Korean political entertainment traces back to the 1930s when Mandam, a unique kind of political satiric talk became popular in 1930s. Mandam played a satiric role in influencing public opinion on political affairs, particularly led by the early generation of Mandam storytellers. Their criticism centered on Japanese colonial rule, even though Mandam was limited in terms of freedom of speech during this period. Furthermore, this study highlights that the great popularity of Mandam was driven by business organizations for the commercial purpose. Mandam was placed at the core of intricate relationships among the related industries. In sum, the present study concludes that as distinctive form blending political information and entertainment, Mandam played a vital role in expressing individuals‟ political opinions under the communicative circumstances during the Japanese colonial period.
104. Cultura International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Annette Thorsen Vilslev Feelings of Discomfort in Ōe's “Prize Stock”
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This article examines the feelings of discomfort in the works of Nobel Prize winner Kenzaburo Ōe. Focusing on Ōe's first short story “Prize Stock”, Shiiku (1957), the article discusses how the incredible event of a black pilot falling from the sky in the mountains near a small Japanese village during World War II refers to more general racial issues than those described. The discussion argues that Ōe's story, criticized as racist because of the treatment of the black airman, should be read in a broader view, thematising the problems of race and marginalisation in Japan and beyond.
105. Cultura International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
I Gede Mugi Raharja East and West Cross Cultural Semiotics: On Taman Ujung Bali Architecture
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Indonesia had absorbed various cultures since ancient times, caused the local cultures were enriched with sign language. However, signs on the traditional culture in Indonesia are more symbolic in nature. Interestingly, East and West cross-cultural sign was encountered in Bali, on Sukasada Park design, in Ujung Village, Karangasem regency. The park which was known as Taman Ujung was a legacy of Karangasem Kingdom. This article was compiled from the results of research conducted in 1999, 2012 and 2016. The latest study was specifically conducted to examine the signs on the design of Taman Ujung. Therefore, this study used a semiotic approach, which deals with the science of signs. Such signs could be seen in the form of design, material‟s quality and decoration of the building. The pavilion, placed in the middle of the pond caused Taman Ujung was different from the traditional Balinese garden in general. The Pavilion, called Gili, became a sign of the influence of modern western architecture. The use of concrete construction and decorative concrete mold were signs of the influence of western technology. Their decorative Karang Bentala and a lion with a crown were related to the Royal Dutch symbol mark. This sign implies the meaning of good relations between Karangasem Kingdom and Netherlands‟ Kingdom in the past.
106. Cultura International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Ulani Yunus Symbols of Cross-cultural Communication in Kasepuhan Palace Indonesia
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The purpose of this study is to illustrate how art and culture in the Kasepuhan Palace can be interpreted as a form of cross-cultural communication. The inquiry addresses two research questions: What are cultures that interact in the 15th century in Indonesia? and How does this interaction appear in Kasepuhan Palace. The results show interactions with culture from India, China, Egypt and Europe. Among the motives: trade, the spread of religion and international politics.
107. Cultura International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Luqman Hakim, Siti Mutiah Setiawati Building Up Trust in Peaceful and Democratic One Asia
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Globalization cannot be stopped nor denied. Sometimes it may have not only a positive impact but also a negative one, as rivalry among nations may ensue. Economic and political rivalry leads to break up of the conducive environment of political security. Unresolved territorial claims and boundary disputes may become triggering factors. Superpowers’ interference may had to the conflict. The purpose of this article is to explain the possibilities of building up trust in peaceful and democratic One Asia Community by systematically and effectively introducing educational programs to enhance awareness of cultural differences, teach conflict resolution techniques, and promote an ideal of ethical responsibility and unselfishness.
108. Cultura International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology: Volume > 14 > Issue: 1
Nicolito A. Gianan Cross-Cultural Semiotic Dialogue and the Spoliarium
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The trade-offs of “meaning-making” between East and West may be regarded as an aggiornamento (“updating”) for any culture in contact. But since aggiornamento entails a wide range of subjects, the essay situates the meaning-making within the scope of masterpieces in diverse formats, from the printed literary text to the painted image (e.g., Spoliarium). Specifically, the essay offers a rethinking of the cross-cultural semiotic dialogue, paving the way for recognizing the homo significans. However, the customary framing of the Spoliarium does not seem to warrant its conscious knowledge and understanding as a text and a visual art. For this reason, the essay endorses its reframing and its aggiornamento, which is induced by the rapid advancement of science and technology.
109. Cultura International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Asunción López-Varela Azcárate Introduction: Performance, Medial Innovation and Culture
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110. Cultura International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Ananta Charan Sukla Indian Intercultural Poetics: the Sanskrit Rasa-Dhvani Theory
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Rasa, Dhvani and Rasa-Dhvani are the major critical terms in Sanskrit poetics that developed during the post-Vedic classical period. Rasa (lit. juice) is used by a sage named Bharata (c. 4th C. B.C. – 1st C. A.D.) to denote the aesthetic experience of a theatrical audience. But Anandavardhana (9th C. A.D.) and Abhinavagupta (10th C. A.D.) intermedialize this experience by extending it to a reader of poetry. They argue that rasa is also generated by a linguistic potency called dhvani. Some critics like Bhoja (11th C. A.D.) also proposed generation of rasa by pictorial art, and further, some modern critics propose to trace dhvani property in non-verbal arts such as dance and music pleading thereby that these non-verbal arts also generate rasa. The present essay examines these arguments and concludes that generation of rasa is confined to only the audio-visual and verbal arts such as the theatre and poetry, and, dhvani as a specific linguistic potency, is strictly confined to the verbal arts. Its intermedialization is a contradiction in terms.
111. Cultura International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Krishna Praveen, V. Anitha Devi Kathakali: The Quintessential Classical Theatre of Kerala
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The term Kathakali has by far become a word that is known widely among theatre lovers all over the world. It is no longer an art intended to perform within the four walls of a temple in Kerala, with only a limited educated upper class to appreciate. In its evolution, it has become a symbol that represents a society, culture and tradition.This paper explores Kathakali art form, tracing its origin and evolution and analyzing how it hasbecome a socio-cultural icon. The paper also intends a comparative analysis of Kathakali with its counterparts – Krishnanaattam, Koodiyattam and Yakshagana – in order to substantiate its pre-eminence.
112. Cultura International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Jinghua Guo Adaptations of Shakespeare to Chinese Theatre
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In the 20th century, the adaptation of William Shakespeare's classic dramas onto the Chinese stage have attracted great interest. The study of such cross-cultural adaptations has positive significance not only for development of literary theory, literary criticism and literary history, but also in that it promotes unusual forms of innovation with regards to the study of performance in general. Chinese adaptations to performance and opera have allowed Chinese people to understand the essence of Shakespeare's plays, presented in a more forms, and as a consequence, such adaptations function as a bridge for Sino-foreign cross-cultural exchanges and interpretations. These paper traces a panorama of Shakespeare's adaptations onto the Chinese stage in the year that celebrates the 500 anniversary of his death.
113. Cultura International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Cyril-Mary Pius Olatunji, Mojalefa L.J. Koenane Philosophical Rumination on Gelede: an Ultra-Spectacle Performance
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Gelede is a typical Yoruba concept which has evolved into a traditional form of musical performance with its influence has transcend its traditional abode in the Yoruba communities of Nigeria and West Africa to Latin Americas, parts of Europe, Australia and the Black world at large. It also evolves beyond mere localized performance in which members of a community gathered in the town squares, market squares or the typical under the tree arrangements to a wider scale in all aspects of the social, and even religiouslives of the people. This paper combines an expository and comparative analysis with its main objective to sensitise scholarly attention to the phenomenon and to provide supplementary concise and critical source for further studies, philosophic analyses and scholarly interpretations.
114. Cultura International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
María Vives Agurruza The Cultural Impact of the Nanking Massacre in Cinematography: On City of Life and Death (2009) and The Flowers of War (2011)
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The Flowers of War (2012), based on the homonymous novel by Geling Yan, and City of Life and Death (2009) are recent Chinese films that deal with the so-called 'Nanking Massacre‘ or 'the Rape of Nanking‘. The events which inspired these stories in the context of the second Sino-Japanese War will be analysed through the study and comparison of both films, together with the reasons which led the directors to fictionalise a series of events so many years after they occurred in 1937. This analysis will be carried out based on the testimonies of the foreigners who eyewitnessed the events at the time, and who left written testimony of the facts, and a comparison shall be made between the fictional and factual events.
115. Cultura International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Qingben Li China’s Micro Film: Socialist Cultural Production in the Micro Era
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During the past ten years, China’s micro film industry has made a rapid development aided by technological changes. Focusing on three types of micro films, this paper reveals some characteristics of China’s micro films within socialist cultural production with Chinese characteristics. This model departs from a past when the government managed everything during the Planned Economy, but is also different from the models of cultural policy in the West. The micro films examined are A Murder Case Triggered by a Steamed Bun, a parody of film Wuji (The Promise 2005), market-conspiracy micro films such asImminent and The Only Choice, and social-welfare micro films likeI will give you happiness when I grow up. All of them bring forth the issue of coordination and harmonization of conflict between social-welfare and market efficiency.
116. Cultura International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Annette Thorsen Vilslev Following Pasolini in Words, Photos, and Film, and his Perception of Cinema as Language
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Discussing the intercultural reception of Pier Paolo Pasolini, this article looks into the intercultural and medial crossovers of his person and his work. It shows the historical particularities of Pasolini's work, and it traces layers of intermedial references in his movie production, describing the many-layered intercultural interplay. Lastly, it focuses on the discussions of media relations, and the remedialisation inherent in much of Pasolini's work.
117. Cultura International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Adile Aslan Almond Reading Rainer Fassbinder’s adaptation Fontane Effi Briest
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Fontane Effi Briest by the German director Rainer Werner Fassbinder is arguably one of the greatest adaptations from literature to screen, and the best Effi Briest adaptation. Although the first reception of the movie, when it appeared in 1974, was not without unmixed reviews, most scholars nowadays share the conviction that it is a masterpiece. Elke Siegel defines the film as a success both at the Berlinale and at the box office (Siege, 2012: 378). Kreft Wetzel, however, in an interview with Fassbinder in 1974, refers to the ambivalent attitude of the critics abroad at the time of the movie‘s release, to which Fassbinder replies that Fontane‘s language is the foundation of the movie and, hence, the film works to its full extent only in German (Wetzel, 1992: 157). Forty years after this interview and judging from the scholarly work carried out on Fassbinder in general and Fontane Effi Briest in particular, it is plausible to claim that Fassbinder‘s art has moved beyond the language barriers and appeals to an audience beyond the German culture and language.
118. Cultura International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Yang Geng, Lingling Peng The Time Phenomenon of Chinese Zen and Video Art in China: 1988-1998
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As a response to the problems of language in Chinese modern and avant-garde art from 1988 to 1998, early video art reclaimed the independence of language from social reality and political influence and established it on the basis of the time phenomenon. By comparing the category of time in the Western philosophical tradition and in Chinese traditional thought, we find that the “immediacy” of Zen provides a hermeneutical approach to the nature of language as a reflective medium, closely related to the silent experience. In line with the three basic principles of transcendental Zen, video media purifies body language into the immaterial language in three ways – through disembodied video movement, the de-objectified video image, and discontinuous video narrative.
119. Cultura International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Carolina Fernández Castrillo Lyric Simultaneities: From “Words in Freedom” to Holopoetry
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Early 20th century Futurist attempts in visual poetry can be related to technology-based poetic creation and current digital experiences. This essay seeks to enhance the understanding of Media Poetry by identifying the existing connections between the “words in freedom” and Eduardo Kac's Holopoetry. This example of interactive and immaterial creation represents a crucial contribution to redefine poetry‟s relevance to contemporary global networks and also a milestone to understand the future of virtual and immersive writing spaces.
120. Cultura International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology: Volume > 13 > Issue: 2
Janez Strehovec Digital Art in the Artlike Culture and Networked Economy
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Contemporary art based on new media is situated at the intersection of art-as-we-know-it, smart technologies, digital and algorithmic culture, networked economy, (post)politics, as well as bio and techno sciences. Contemporary art enters into intense relations with these fields, including interactions, adoption of methodological devices and approaches, changes of the areas of activity, hybridization and amalgamation. This text explores those features of contemporary life and culture which are affected by digital art and the recombination, appropriation, remediation, reusing, repurposing, and transfer of artistic procedures/tools from one context or field to another.