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Displaying: 11-20 of 2785 documents


reviews
11. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 4
Carlos Alberto Sánchez, Kierkegaard and the Matter of Philosophy: A Fractured Dialectic, by Michael O'Neill Burns
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12. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 4
James S. Spiegel, Philosophy of Religion: Selected Readings, 5th edition, edited by Michael Peterson, William Hasker, Bruce Reichenbach, and David Basinger
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13. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 4
Michael Thune, Disagreement, by Bryan Frances
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14. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 4
Seth Tichenor, The Philosophy of Technology: The Technological Condition, 2nd edition, by Robert Scharff and Val Dusek
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15. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 4
Index to Volume 38 (2015)
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articles
16. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 3
Leslie Burkholder, Impartial Grading Revisited
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In a much-discussed article on fair grading, Daryl Close said that impartial and consistent grading of students forbids practices like grading on a curve and dropping the lowest grade. I show—negatively—that impartiality and consistency don’t forbid these practices. I also show—positively—that some other conditions on fair and reasonable grading do rule out grading on a curve and dropping the lowest grade.
17. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 3
Court D. Lewis, Engaging Student Aversions to Moral Obligations
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This essay examines why some introductory ethics students are averse to any sort of moral requirement (i.e., moral obligation). It provides a series of descriptions and techniques to help teachers recognize, diagnose, and engage such students. After discussing the nature of student aversions to moral obligations, I discuss three causes and several ways to engage each: 1) Student Relativism; 2) student fears and misunderstandings of obligations; and 3) the phenomenon of what I call fetishized liberty, which leads to the “liberty paradox”—where students actively fight for liberties, yet actively give up or fail to use the ones they currently have.
18. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 3
Jane Drexler, Philosophy for General Education: Teaching Introductory Environmental Ethics for Non-Majors
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This article explores the value of teaching Environmental Ethics as an introductory-level general education course for non-majors. It focuses on how philosophy can help students discern multiple voices within discourses, texts and thinking, and by doing so disrupt several untenable mental paradigms that new and underprepared students often bring with them to college: fixed and dualistic notions of truth, relativistic conceptions of difference, and decontextualized approaches to issues and ideas. This article also presents examples of class activities that are designed to foster multivocal thinking and that are also manageable for faculty with high teaching loads.
review article
19. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 3
Anthony Ferrucci, Recent Texts in Logic
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In this review, the relative strengths and weaknesses of four recent logic books are presented. This review is organized thematically, where each text is examined under the following metrics: aesthetic qualities, organization, accessibility, problems and exercises, student resources, instructor resources, and price. Instead of examining each textbook one at a time, a comparison by category showcases each book’s prominent features and themes within that category. Attention is also given in this review to the needs of logic students at the junior college level, whose diverse backgrounds increasingly factor into textbook decisions. Selecting a logic textbook can seem especially daunting given the abundance of choices on the market. Instructors are increasingly forced to select a textbook with numerous, and even competing, considerations in mind. This review intends to make the often difficult process of selecting between new textbooks on the market a little bit easier.
reviews
20. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 3
Chris Calvert-Minor, Minds Online: Teaching Effectively with Technology, by Michelle D. Miller
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