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Displaying: 11-20 of 2801 documents


reviews
11. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
Karen M. Meagher, Public Health Ethics, Second Edition, by Stephen Holland
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12. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
David S. Owen, Subject and Object: Frankfurt School Writings on Epistemology, Ontology, and Method, edited by Ruth Groff
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13. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
Max Suffis, Ontology and Metaontology: A Contemporary Guide, by Francesco Berto and Matteo Plebani
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14. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
John P. Sullins, Understanding Beliefs, by Nils J. Nilsson
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15. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
Mike VanQuickenborne, Everyday Examples: An Introduction to Philosophy, by David Cunning
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16. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
Eleanor Wittrup, Worldly Virtue, by Judith Andre
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articles
17. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 4
Michael H. G. Hoffmann, Jeremy A. Lingle, Facilitating Problem-Based Learning by Means of Collaborative Argument Visualization Software
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There is evidence that problem-based learning (PBL) is an effective approach to teach team and problem-solving skills, but also to acquire content knowledge. However, there is hardly any literature about using PBL in philosophy classes. One problem is that PBL is resource intensive because a facilitator is needed for each group of students to support learning efforts and monitor group dynamics. In order to establish more PBL classes, the question is whether PBL can be provided without the need for facilitators. We present a combination of five strategies—among them the collaborative argument visualization software AGORA-net—to replace facilitators. Additionally, we present evidence that these strategies are sufficient to provide a PBL experience that achieves intended learning goals in an ethics class and is satisfying for students without facilitators.
18. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 4
T. G. Murphy, Does Critical Thinking Vary According to Culture?
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Psychologist Richard Nisbett argues that fundamental aspects of critical thinking and logic are culturally conditioned. Nisbett’s claims, if correct, have substantial implications for the teaching of logic and critical thinking. In this paper I examine Nisbett’s arguments and conclude that he overstates the degree to which his empirical work justifies his theories about cultural difference. I will argue that we have good reason to be cautious about revising our pedagogy on the basis of assumptions about cultural difference, and that Nisbett’s work does not provide convincing enough evidence to justify setting that caution aside.
19. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 4
Mikel Burley, How to Teach Philosophy of Religion
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Philosophy of religion is a popular area of study with a lot of underexplored potential. For many students, as well as members of the public, it is the area of philosophy that deals most explicitly with the “big questions” that engage them directly. But a preoccupation with overly technical argumentation and decontextualized examples of religious beliefs can be off-putting. In this article, I discuss broader and narrower visions of philosophy of religion, outlining what needs to be included in any introductory course while also exploring ways of diversifying the syllabus and deepening approaches to existing topics for more advanced-level students. Without overlooking the risks of spreading the content too thinly, I highlight how increased interdisciplinarity and greater cross-cultural awareness can enliven the subject.
reviews
20. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 38 > Issue: 4
Paul Carelli, A Plato Reader: Eight Essential Dialogues, edited by C. D. C. Reeve
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