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Displaying: 11-20 of 2819 documents


reviews
11. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 2
Abigail Gosselin, The Most Good You Can Do: How Effective Altruism is Changing Ideas about Living Ethically, by Peter Singer
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12. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 2
William S. Lewis, Philosophy of Social Science: A New Introduction, edited by Nancy Cartwright and Eleonora Montuschi
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13. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 2
Nancy J. Matchett, Debating Procreation: Is it Wrong to Reproduce?, by David Benatar and David Wasserman
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14. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 2
Jennifer McCrickerd, Educating a Diverse Nation: Lessons from Minority-Serving Institutions, by Clifton Conrad and Marybeth Gasman
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15. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 2
Robert C. Robinson, Contemporary Debates in Bioethics, edited by Arthur L. Caplan and Robert Arp
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16. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 2
W. Mark Smillie, Environmental Ethics: An Overview for the Twenty-First Century, 2nd edition, fully revised and expanded, by Robin Attfield
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17. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 2
Jere Surber, Phenomenology: An Introduction, by Stephan Käufer and Anthony Chemero
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18. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 2
Dwayne A. Tunstall, American Philosophy: From Wounded Knee to the Present, by Erin McKenna and Scott L. Pratt
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articles
19. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
David W. Concepción, Melinda Messineo, Sarah Wieten, Catherine Homan, The State of Teacher Training in Philosophy
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This paper explores the state of teacher training in philosophy graduate programs in the English-speaking world. Do philosophy graduate programs offer training regarding teaching? If so, what is the nature of the training that is offered? Who offers it? How valuable is it? We conclude that philosophers want more and better teacher training, and that collectively we know how to deliver and support it.
20. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 1
Stephen Bloch-Schulman, Meagan Carr, Beyond “Add Teaching and Learning and Stir”: Epistemologies of Ignorance, Teaching and Learning in Philosophy, and the Need for Resistance
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This article is a critical response to Concepción, Messineo, Wieten, and Homan’s “The State of Teacher Training in Philosophy.” In it, I utilize an epistemologies-of-ignorance framework to highlight the incentives we, as philosophers, have to ignore teaching and learning about teaching and learning. I argue that the problems are not merely about our individual desires, but rather, that there is a regime of ignorance that encourages us not to know. I argue therefore that real change requires more than a shift in personal commitments; it requires a change to the system, including how and what we make public and how we evaluate and are evaluated by our peers.