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Displaying: 11-20 of 2837 documents


reviews
11. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 3
Debra Jackson, Experiential Learning in Philosophy, Julinna Oxley and Ramona Ilea, editors
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12. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 3
Jennifer Kling, On Inequality, by Harry G. Frankfurt
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13. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 3
Christofer Koch, On Philosophy: Notes From a Crisis, by John McCumber
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14. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 3
Joseph A. Petrick, Business Ethics: An Interactive Introduction, by Andrew Kernohan
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15. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 3
Philip Smith, A Journey Through Philosophy in 101 Anecdotes, by Nicholas Rescher
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16. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 3
Matthew Van Cleave, What Philosophy Can Do, by Gary Gutting
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17. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 3
Andy Wible, Mass Moralizing: Marketing and Moral Storytelling, by Phil Hopkins
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18. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 3
Errata
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articles
19. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 2
Steven Geisz, Body Practice and Meditation as Philosophy: Teaching Qigong, Taijiquan, and Yoga in College Courses
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What challenges arise when attempting to incorporate body practice and meditation into undergraduate philosophy courses? In recent years, a number of philosophers have begun teaching such practices in academic classrooms, and at my university I have experimented specifically with teaching qigong, taijiquan (i.e., t’ai chi), hatha yoga, and meditation techniques in a variety of courses on East Asian and Indian philosophy. Teaching body practices and meditations poses potential problems about exclusion and advocacy in the classroom: exclusion, in the sense that the practices might improperly marginalize certain students from full participation, and advocacy, in the sense that including these practices in a class might amount to problematic advocacy of a particular substantive set of religious values. This paper explores ways I have addressed these problems through a variety of pragmatic, situation-specific approaches and by encouraging students to have a sense of ownership about the practices and the learning environment itself.
20. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 2
Tanya Hall, Dean Tracy, Andy Lamey, Exploring Video Feedback in Philosophy: Benefits for Instructors and Students
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This paper explores the benefits of video feedback for teaching philosophy. Our analysis, based on results from a self-report student survey along with our own experience, indicates that video feedback possesses a number of advantages over traditional written comments. In particular we argue that video feedback is conducive to providing high-quality formative feedback, increases detail and clarity, and promotes student engagement. In addition, we argue that the advantages of video feedback make the method an especially apt tool for addressing challenges germane to teaching philosophy. Video feedback allows markers to more easily explain and illustrate philosophical goals and methods. It allows markers to model the doing of philosophy and thereby helps students to see philosophy’s value. Video feedback is a promising tool for addressing both cognitive and affective barriers to learning philosophy. Such advantages are especially valuable in the context of a student-centered, intentional learning framework. In light of these advantages, we find that video feedback is underappreciated and underutilized.