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Displaying: 11-20 of 2871 documents


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11. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 40 > Issue: 1
Alison Suen, Teaching Taboo Topics: Why It Matters and How to Pull it Off
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In this paper, I offer justifications and strategies for teaching taboo, unpopular, or rarely contested views in undergraduate ethics courses. Teaching taboo topics, while challenging, forcefully demonstrates the commitment that few topics in ethics have obvious answers, and that the study of ethics is more than just debating right and wrong. Drawing from my experience teaching on the topic of bestiality, I articulate the importance of motivating topics that may appear remote and irrelevant to students. Inspired by Kathy Rudy’s queer theory approach to the question of bestiality, I propose that we broaden and reframe taboo issues when teaching undergraduates. Instead of introducing these issues with the typical “Is it right or wrong to do X,” I recommend that we examine the essential political, metaphysical, and epistemological presumptions that inform and shape our moral judgments.
reviews
12. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 40 > Issue: 1
Daniel Bloom, Plato’s Timaeus, 2nd edition, translated by Peter Kalkavage
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13. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 40 > Issue: 1
Tobyn DeMarco, Philosophy of Song and Singing: An Introduction, by Jeanette Bicknell
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14. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 40 > Issue: 1
Terrence L. Johnson, Engaging Political Philosophy: An Introduction, by Robert B. Talisse
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15. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 40 > Issue: 1
Sanford Levy, Metaethics: A Contemporary Introduction, by Mark van Roojen
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16. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 40 > Issue: 1
Michael T. McFall, Taking Pascal’s Wager: Faith, Evidence, and the Abundant Life, by Michael Rota
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17. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 40 > Issue: 1
Timothy G. Murphy, A Pocket Guide to Critical Thinking, 5th edition, by Richard Epstein; illustrated by Alex Raffi
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articles
18. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 4
Brian Besong, Teaching the Debate
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One very common style of teaching philosophy involves remaining publicly neutral regarding the views being debated—a technique commonly styled ‘teaching the debate.’ This paper seeks to survey evidence from the literature in social psychology that suggests teaching the debate naturally lends itself to student skepticism toward the philosophical views presented. In contrast, research suggests that presenting one’s own views alongside teaching the debate in question—or ‘engaging the debate’—can effectively avoid eliciting skeptical attitudes among students without sacrificing desirable pedagogical outcomes. Thus, there are good reasons to engage philosophical debates as an educator, not merely teach them.
19. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 4
Andrew Fisher, Jonathan Tallant, Helping Philosophy Students Become (Even More) Employable
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Can we help philosophy students become employable without offending those who say that such a task is not the job of an academic? Can we do this by using the insights from the literature that suggest the most effective way to teach employability is a close link to employers? We are happy to report that the answer is ‘yes.’ In this paper we share what we achieved and why we believe it was effective. We briefly discuss the background and genesis of ‘Communicating Philosophy,’ our employability course. We provide a detailed description of the objectives and content of the lectures and seminars and reflect on how the course was received by students. We then, using the notion of ‘transfer’ and ‘boundary-crossing,’ reflect on why our approach has been successful. We end by discussing some limitations of our course and about how the course might be developed in the future.
20. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 39 > Issue: 4
Joel Hubick, A Philosophical Response to Plagiarism
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I analyze the potential a link between the problem of plagiarism and academic responsibility. I consider whether or not the way teachers and students view each other, education, and the writing process is irresponsible wherein producing papers becomes more valuable than the genuine learning that paper writing is originally intended to indicate and facilitate. This irresponsibility applies to both students and teachers who allow writing papers to be industrialized into meaningless tasks done in order to obtain a grade / pass a course. In this irresponsible situation, plagiarism can appear an efficient, albeit dishonest, gamble to succeed. Using the thought of Edmund Husserl, Martin Heidegger, and Jan Patoèka to philosophically assess and respond to this academic situation, I argue for a way to restore the teacher-student relationship to a proper state of care and responsibility.