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Displaying: 11-20 of 30 documents


book reviews
11. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Jeffrey A. Gauthier Gender, Social Construction, and The Second Sex
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12. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Alexander V. Stehn Loving Immigrants in America: The Philosophical Power of Stories
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13. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Harry van der Linden Climate Change and Our Political Future
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14. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Nicole Whalen Overcoming Private Government
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15. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 21 > Issue: 2
Contributors
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16. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 21 > Issue: 1
Harry van der Linden A Note from the Editor
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21st-century socialism: concepts and visions
17. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 21 > Issue: 1
Sebastian Purcell, Sarah E. Vitale Guest Editors' Introduction
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section 1: diagnosing the present moment
18. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 21 > Issue: 1
David Schweickart Capitalism vs the Climate: What Then Should We Do? What Then Should I Do?
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We are facing a terrifying moment in human history, but also a miraculous moment. At the very time when climate change threatens our species with extinction, we not only know that we face an existential threat, we have the means not only to avert catastrophe, but to provide virtually everybody on our planet with the material means for decent life. This paper asks, and attempts to answer, a series of questions: Why are we not doing what needs to be done? Is there a viable alternative to our current economic order? What then should I do?
19. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 21 > Issue: 1
Tony Smith Beyond Extreme Monetary Policy . . . and Towards Twenty-First Century Socialism?
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Extreme monetary policies successfully prevented the “Great Recession” of 2007–2009 from turning into a global depression. However, they did not address the underlying problems in global capitalism. In recent years prominent “insiders” of global capitalism have proposed reforms designed to remedy these defects. I argue that these proposals are inadequate, due in great part to a failure to acknowledge a profound change in the “deep structure” of capitalism. Technological change, which in the past has contributed so much to the dynamism of capitalism development, no longer does so. The need for extreme monetary policies in the aftermath of the Great Recession of 2007–2009, the failure of these policies, and the lack of plausible alternatives to them, are all symptoms of an underlying disease beyond cure. A path towards a democratic form of socialism must be forged for the simple yet compelling reason Rosa Luxemburg articulated: it is a matter of socialism or barbarism.
section 2: visions of 21st-century socialism
20. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 21 > Issue: 1
Sebastian Purcell Liberation Politics as a (New) Socialist Politics
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Liberation philosophy was born from radical, socialist roots. Yet recent developments by major figures in the tradition, including Enrique Dussel, would appear to position the movement unhelpfully closer to liberalism. The present article argues that this is a misconception, and that Liberation philosophy rather suggests a new ideal for conceptions of political justice, one that also helpfully avoids a number of common objections that dog traditional socialist proposals. The work of John Rawls is used as a dialogical counter point to suggest the relative merits for the new approach Liberation philosophy suggest for socialism.