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Displaying: 11-18 of 18 documents


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11. Philosophy Today: Volume > 62 > Issue: 3
Ian Maclachlan Derrida, Time, and Infinite Finitude: Weakening Hägglund’s Negative
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This article presents a critique of the influential reading of Derrida proposed by Martin Hägglund, focusing in particular on the latter’s account of time, différance, and finitude in Derrida’s work. It concludes that, at root, there is a persistent misapplication of a notion of the negative in Hägglund’s reading, and that this feature can most revealingly be linked to a misconception about Derrida’s conception of mortal limits.
12. Philosophy Today: Volume > 62 > Issue: 3
Arianne Françoise Conty Sovereign Power, Sovereign Justice: Carl Schmitt and Jacques Derrida on the State of Exception
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In his book Political Theology, Carl Schmitt compared the freedom of God over and beyond the laws of nature to sovereign power, understood as transcending the laws of the state. Philosopher Jacques Derrida has argued that such a Schmittian political theology undermines the possibility of democracy from within. Yet in this paper I would like to develop Derrida’s understanding of justice in order to show that it functions in a similar way to Schmitt’s understanding of sovereign power. Because justice is always singular for Derrida, it transcends politics and is identified with a transcendent alterity beyond the iterability of the law. If Schmitt’s understanding of power as a State of Exception undermines democracy from within, by placing justice in a dimension beyond politics and the law, Derrida’s notion of justice also functions as a State of Exception and undermines the democratic project from without, depriving it of its performative power.
13. Philosophy Today: Volume > 62 > Issue: 3
Bernard Flynn The Phenomenological Reduction and the Revolutionary Sensibility
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This paper proposes to show an elective affinity between the attempt to construct a transcendence within immanence; both in the writings of Descartes and in the Cartesian strain in the philosophy of Husserl and the revolutionary sensibility, that is, the attempt to render history transparent to itself, delivered from division, conflict, and politics. It views the work of Lukács in History and Class-Consciousness as the link between the two. It concludes by evoking Merleau-Ponty’s critique of both the completed reduction and our class-consciousness as the bearer of the rationality of history.
14. Philosophy Today: Volume > 62 > Issue: 3
Max Schaefer The Issue of Novelty in Husserl’s Analysis of Absolute Time-Constituting Consciousness
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This paper concerns the issue as to whether novelty plays a significant role in Husserl’s analysis of time. To address this matter, I show that horizontal and transverse intentionality constitute absolute consciousness as a process of self-differentiation, which enables the ego to anticipate its own renewal and yet to escape coinciding with this synthesising activity. I then further analyse time-constituting consciousness as a process of self-differentiation through a study of Husserl’s account of retention and protention. Addressing Husserl’s presumed neglect of protention, I demonstrate that Husserl reveals that retention and protention modify and motivate one another, and find that this provides a role for novelty within Husserl’s account of the continuity of time. I maintain that this novelty assumes two forms: one that is absolute or necessary, and another that is relative or accidental.
15. Philosophy Today: Volume > 62 > Issue: 3
Stefano Micali The Repetition of a Singularity: Phenomenology of Déjà Vu
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Phenomenology aims at analyzing the constitutive moments of the different experiences by doing justice to their specific ways of appearing. By doing so, it can make visible (and therefore correct) the problematic assumptions taken as valid from the outset. These assumptions coherently distort and manipulate the phenomena in such a way that the phenomena are transformed into something radically different. The phenomenon of déjà vu is very interesting in this regard for two different reasons. Déjà vu is transformed into a different phenomenon in the field of cognitive sciences: déjà-vu is commonly understood as a simple memory error. Secondly, déjà vu implies a repetition of a unique, contingent experience. This logic of repetition is not easily compatible with the logos of empirical sciences that focus on the identification of invariant relations between general terms through experimental research and therefore requires a different approach.
book discussion: emanuela bianchi, the feminine symptom: aleatory matter in the aristotelian cosmos
16. Philosophy Today: Volume > 62 > Issue: 3
Christopher P. Long Symptoms of Interruption: Responding to Bianchi’s The Feminine Symptom
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17. Philosophy Today: Volume > 62 > Issue: 3
Cinzia Arruzza Aleatory Feminism in Emanuela Bianchi’s The Feminine Symptom
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18. Philosophy Today: Volume > 62 > Issue: 3
Emanuela Bianchi Beyond Acting and Being Acted Upon: A Response to Christopher Long and Cinzia Arruzza
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