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Displaying: 11-20 of 189 documents


11. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 8 > Issue: 19
Heidi L. Pennington “But why must readers be made to feel. . . .”: Repulsing Readerly Sympathy for Ethical Ends in the Victorian Realist Novel
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In this article, I investigate the ethical potential of Victorian literature that markedly discourages readerly sympathy with the protagonists. Generating sympathy for fictional characters was, and often still is, considered to be the primary way in which the novel promotes ethical thoughts, feelings, and behavior in readers. For this reason, the ethical prospects of novels that fail or refuse to make their main characters appealing and instead inspire aversion in readers have received very little critical attention. Taking an unpopular novel by Anthony Trollope as my primary example, I analyze how the formal narrative strategy of “disnarration” (theorized by Gerald Prince) creates profound dislike for the book’s protagonists. Further, I propose that these same passages of disnarration, by emphasizing the text’s fictionality, can encourage readers to seek the sympathetic fulfillment that the text refuses them by engaging with the real world. In this way, I argue, even Victorian realist novels that defy the conventions of sympathy might still share an investment in realizing the ethical potential of fiction.
12. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 8 > Issue: 19
Charles Altiei Aesthetics of Affects: What Can Affect Tell Us about Literature?
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book reviews
13. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 8 > Issue: 19
Arjun Poudel European Avant-garde Studies and the Future of Europe
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14. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 8 > Issue: 19
Rockwell F. Clancy Complicating the Dualisms: History versus Becoming
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15. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 8 > Issue: 19
J. Chris Westgate Philosophical Tensions in Modern Dramatic Literature
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16. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 8 > Issue: 19
Notice to Contribution
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17. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 18
Contributors
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18. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 18
Herman Rapaport A Lover’s Lobster: Somatic Projection in Proust
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This paper considers a minor if not fleeting detail from Marcel Proust's À la recherche du temps perdu which easily escapes noticeability though it is a signifier that reverberates with and, in fact, repeats the extremely well known epiphany of the Madeleine, though by way of an extremely muted parody that I doubt a reader would notice if he or she had not stopped to examine it. This detail concerns a lobster dismantled on Marcel's plate during lunch at the home of the Swanns. My argument is that the figure of the lobster is what psychologists call a "somatic projection," which in this case has a surreal effect, given that the lobster suddenly becomes a substitute for, say, a woman's body. Moreover, by way of a culinary issue concerning the preparation of lobsters in France and the types of lobstersthat are being prepared, the lobster improbably becomes an object that symbolically traverses sexual orientations, which is also a somatic projection of sorts. That the lobster is a fantasized sexual object whose monstrosity is constitutive of a sexual field divided by different orientations is a matter that this paper takes up. The paper ends with a few remarks about Salvador Dali's surrealist use of imagining the lobster as a fetish object for woman's sex. In various degrees, this paper is relevant to gay studies, object relations theory, the study of fantasy, surrealism in fiction, literature and the culinary, psychology and epistemology, visual art, and, of course, Proust studies.
19. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 18
Chris Hughes Dialogue Between Fukuyama’s Account of the End of History and Derrida’s Hauntology
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This paper explores the relationship between Fukuyama’s account of history and Derrida’s theory of hauntology. Initially, I use Derrida’s idea of hauntology tocritique Fukuyama’s account of an end of history. I argue that Derrida’s idea of a hauntology is a valuable theoretical tool for theorising about politics, sinceDerrida shows that the death of a particular social/political system (e.g. Communism) does not entail the death/devaluing of the thinker(s) who inspired that system, since critics of the contemporary social and political order may have something valuable to offer contemporary political thought. However, I do notendorse the view that history cannot reach an end point just because there are specters waiting to return. Instead, I argue that it is possible to bridge theapparent dualistic binary between Derrida’s hauntology and Fukuyama’s end of history, since the specter is something which must be recognised and realised atthe end of history.
20. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 18
Geraldine Friedman History and the Traumatic Narrative of Desire and Enjoyment in Althusser
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Among Marxists and Communists, Louis Althusser has long had a reputation for theoreticism and scientism, the factors most often cited to explain the eclipse of his work since the 1960’s. According to the standard account, the distinguishing characteristic and major flaw of his work is that it brings everything back to knowledge. In this essay, I interrogate this understanding of Althusser by reconsidering two cornerstones of Althusserian theory that seem most to exemplify his extreme privileging of epistemology: the symptom and the interpellation theory of ideology. I argue not that taking them to work on the epistemological level is wrong but rather incomplete; there exists a not quite acknowledged beyond of knowledge and interpellation in Althusser, which takes the form of a traumaticnarrative of history, enjoyment, and desire. The production of knowledge in Althusser unfolds as a pathos-laden story, which on one level gestures toward the turbulent world history in which he developed his theory: primarily WW II and the post-war Stalinist revelations, along with the conflicts it provoked in the Communist Party, and the French Communist Party in particular. Although not the subject of extended analysis, these events haunt Althusser’s texts in the form of allusions and the surprisingly violent figurative language with which Althusser discusses theoretical labor. I contend that they call to be analyzed as a kind of return of the repressed, best approached through Slavoj Žižek’s psychoanalytically inflected theory of ideology.