International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series

Un-Forgetting: Re-Calling Time Lost
2009, ISBN 978-1-58684-274-1
Author: Stephen David Ross
Editor: Stephen David Ross

Table of Contents

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Displaying: 11-17 of 17 documents


chapter 10
11. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series: 2009
Stephen David Ross Diachrony
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A giving which gives only its gift, but in the giving holds itself back and withdraws, . . . . (Heidegger, TB, 8)the Forgotten is . . . the Law. (Lyotard, “HJ," 147)how could this thought (Heidegger’s), a thought so devoted to remembering that a forgetting (of Being) takes place in all thought, in all art, in all “representation” of the world, how could it possibly have ignored the thought of [that] which, in a certain sense, thinks, tries to think, nothing but that very fact? . . . to the point of suppressing and foreclosing to the very end the horrifying (and inane) attempt at exterminating, at making us forget forever what, in Europe, reminds us, ever since the beginning, that “there is” the Forgotten? (Lyotard, HJ, 4)[I]n witnessing, one also exterminates. The witness is a traitor. (Lyotard, I, 204)The Other becomes my neighbour precisely through the way the face summons me, calls for me, begs for me, and in so doing recalls my responsibility, and calls me into question.. . . as if I had to answer for the other’s death even before being. (83)
chapter 11
12. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series: 2009
Stephen David Ross Inheritance
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How does one desire forgetting? How does one desire not to keep?How does one desire mourning (assuming that to mourn, to work at mourning does not amount to keeping . . .)? (Derrida, GT, 36)Jacques Derrida died Friday night, October 8–9, 2004.
chapter 12
13. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series: 2009
Stephen David Ross Pain
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Physical pain has no voice, but when it at last finds a voice, it begins to tell a story, and the story that it tells is about the inseparability of these three subjects, their embeddedness in one another. (Scarry, BP, 3)
chapter 13
14. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series: 2009
Stephen David Ross Disaster
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The disaster ruins everything, all the while leaving everything intact. It does not touch anyone in particular; “I” am not threatened by it, but spared, left aside. It is in this way that I am threatened;. . . .The disaster is separate; that which is most separate.When the disaster comes upon us, it does not come. The disaster is its imminence, but since the future, as we conceive of it in the order of lived time, belongs to the disaster, the disaster has always already withdrawn or dissuaded it; there is no future for the disaster, just as there is no time or space for its accomplishment. (Blanchot, WD, 1–2)
15. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series: 2009
Stephen David Ross Notes
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16. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series: 2009
Stephen David Ross Bibliography
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17. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series: 2009
Stephen David Ross Index
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