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Displaying: 11-20 of 60 documents


book reviews and notices
11. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 51 > Issue: 4
Roland J. Teske, S.J. Faith Order Understanding: Natural Theology in the Augustinian Tradition
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12. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 51 > Issue: 4
John W. Peck, S.J. On Determining What There Is: The Identity of Ontological Categories in Aquinas, Scotus, and Lowe
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13. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 51 > Issue: 4
Joseph W. Koterski, S.J. Death and Donation: Rethinking Brain Death as a Means for Procuring Transplantable Organs
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14. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 51 > Issue: 4
Gary Gabor Plato’s Republic: A Critical Guide
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15. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 51 > Issue: 4
Books Received
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16. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 51 > Issue: 4
Annual Index
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articles
17. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 51 > Issue: 3
About Our Contributors
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18. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 51 > Issue: 3
Paul Symington Metaphysics Renewed: Kant’s Schematized Categories and the Possibility of Metaphysics
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This article considers the significance of Kant’s schematized categories in the Critique of Pure Reason for contemporary metaphysics. I present Kant’s understanding of the schematism and how it functions within his critique of the limits of pure reason. Then I argue that, although the true role of the schemata is a relatively late development in Kant’s thought, it is nevertheless a core notion, and the central task of the first Critique can be sufficiently articulated in the language of the schematism. A surprising result of Kant’s doctrine of the schematism is that a limited form of metaphysics is possible even within the parameters set out in the first Critique. To show this, I offer contrasting examples of legitimate and illegitimate forays into metaphysics in light of the condition of the schematized categories.
19. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 51 > Issue: 3
William Lane Craig Graham Oppy on the Kalam Cosmological Argument
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Graham Oppy has emerged as one of the kalam cosmological argument’s most formidable opponents. He rejects all four of the arguments drawn from metaphysics and physics for the second premiss that the universe began to exist. He also thinks that we have no good reason to accept the first premiss that everything that begins to exist has a cause. In this response, I hope to show that the kalam cosmological argument is, in fact, considerably stronger than Oppy claims, surviving even his trenchant critique.
20. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 51 > Issue: 3
Thomas W. Smythe, Michael Rectenwald Craig on God and Morality
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In this paper we critically evaluate an argument put forward by William Lane Craig for the existence of God based on the assumption that if there were no God, there could be no objective morality. Contrary to Craig, we show that there are some necessary moral truths and objective moral reasoning that holds up whether there is a God or not. We go on to argue that religious faith, when taken alone and without reason or evidence, actually risks undermining morality and is an unreliable source of moral truths. We recommend a viewpoint on morality that is based on reason and public consensus, that is compatible with science, and that cuts across the range of religious and non-religious positions.