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Displaying: 11-20 of 30 documents


11. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2016
Jegoo Lee, Sang-Joon Kim Does Money Really Talk?: Testing Slack Resource Mechanism of Corporate Responsibility
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This paper examines the Slack Resource Mechanism (SRM) in the Corporate Responsibility (CR) literature, proposing that when a firm has enough slacks, it is more likely to engage in CR activities, which eventually improve its financial performance. In order to assess whether or not, and in which contexts SRM really works, this paper reviews two research issues in SRM. Based on literature review, we empirically test two proposed hypotheses with a large-scale longitudinal dataset from 1997 to 2012. We find that firms become involved in CR activities for external stakeholders when they have enough slack resources, and that the slack-induced CR engagements are not favored by the stock market. Based on our research findings, we assure that SRM may need to be reconsidered and further developed.
12. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2016
Patsy G. Lewellyn, Jeanne M. Logsdon How Sustainability Reporting Is Maturing: A Preliminary Assessment of the Impact of GRI’s G4 Guidelines
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This paper examines the incremental value added to sustainability reporting by changes in disclosure requirements of the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) G4 guidelines in the Metals and Mining industry. Three companies’ most recent G4 sustainability reports are critically compared to their previous G3 reports, and the some results of content analysis are reported.
13. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2016
Haiying Lin Government-Business Partnerships for Radical Eco-Innovation
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14. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2016
Barrie Litzky, Lynne Andersson, William P. Smith Stay With Me: An Investigation Into The Durability Of Social Capital Accumulation For Urban Entrepreneurs
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Using the lens of neo-localism and sustainable livelihoods, this paper considers the process and outcomes achieved through networks of locally-based entrepreneurs. Guided by a grounded theory approach, interviews with several entrepreneurs in the Sustainable Business Network of Philadelphia were conducted. Based on these findings, we were able to identify eight strategies that provided benefits to the firms and the broader network. These strategies further enhanced in the livelihood assets of the community, including human, social, financial, natural, and physical capital.
15. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2016
Tammy MacLean, Barrie Litzky, Lynne Andersson, Michael Behnam Minding the Gap(s): Unintended Consequences of Decoupling
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This paper explores how policy-practice decoupling affects organizational insiders, synthesizing literatures on decoupling, organizational identity, behavioral integrity, and organizational cynicism to derive a theoretical model illustrating the effects of organization-level structural choices on individual perceptions and actions.
16. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2016
Virginia Munro, Denni Arli, Sharyn Rundle-Thiele CSR Strategy at a Crossroads: An example of a Multinational Corporation in a Developing and Developed Society
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The relationship between Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and society is at a crossroads. In particular, multinational enterprises (MNEs) must operate in multiple host environments while maintaining a social license to operate, and increasingly adopt CSR strategy relevant to stakeholders in these environments. This study examines MNE employee perceptions of CSR from one multinational in Indonesia and Australia, and determines their identification with and engagement in the organization’s CSR Social Initiatives (SIs). The results reveal perceived CSR has a significant effect on identification with SIs for Indonesian employees but not for Australian employees. Second, the importance of CSR has an effect on employee’s identification with SIs (SI-I) and SI-I has a significant effect on engagement with SIs in both countries. This suggests that MNEs need to educate employees generally in developed and developing countries on the importance that companies practice CSR. However for developing countries like Indonesia, managers may need to focus more on employee perceptions of the organization’s perceived CSR, as this affects SI-I and subsequent engagement. These findings provide a unique contribution toward combining business and society under the umbrella of one MNE in two different countries.
17. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2016
Maria J. Murcia May Corporate Social Responsibility Have a Bearing Upon the Shifting Boundaries of the Firm?
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Whereas ‘strategic’ Corporate Social Responsibility (henceforth, CSR) scholars (e.g.: Husted & Allen, 2006, 2007; McWilliams, Siegel, & Wright, 2006; McWilliams & Siegel, 2000) have studied CSR as a competitiveness and/or differentiation tool (Panwar, Nybakk, Hansen, & Pinkse, 2016) -this is, a competitive strategy’s outcome-, CSR has remained ‘out of the loop’ of the broader corporate strategy choice discussion and, in specific, unexplored as an antecedent of firm’s scope. Granted that firms formulate different governance strategies to effectively implement corporate objectives (Harrigan, 1985), my ongoing investigation focuses on how CSR may come to play into decisions pertaining to vertical scope, that is, how firms organize internal or external supplier-buyer relationships along their value chains (Jacobides & Billinger, 2006). The need for this research stems from the fact that in a context of global dispersion of production, normative pressure concerning the need for environmental protection and growing demands to redress social concerns compel firms to reconsider their vertical relationships.
18. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2016
Jo Ann Oravec Profiting from Privacy: Critical Analyses of Business Initiatives Involving Personal Privacy and Information Control
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Privacy has played substantial roles in culture and commerce for centuries, but its political and economic impacts have intensified as utilizations of information technologies have expanded. Businesses should consider whether their increasing investments in data collection and analysis are indeed worth their costs in erosion of trust between themselves and their customers (and other stakeholders). This paper examines specific kinds of data, including from geospatial systems and “Internet of Things” applications. It also discusses potential expansion of US privacy discourse from the Fourth Amendment of the Constitution to the Third (which may be interpreted to involve limits on residential “quartering” of intelligent computer agents as well as human soldiers). Businesses may find that privacy-related products and services can provide strategic advantages as privacy concerns intensify. However, opportunistic business exploitations of privacy fears without provision of effective solutions may backfire as households share experiences via word-of-mouth and social media crowdsourcing.
19. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2016
Caddie Putnam Rankin, Todd Matthews Benefit Corporation Certification: An Initial Exploration of Mechanisms of Legitimacy in Two Industries
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This paper develops a theoretical framework to explain how B-Corps certification is used by organizations to gain legitimacy in their industry and among diverse stakeholders. We explore two research propositions using data from pilot cases. The paper introduces our preliminary findings, outlines a revision of the study based on these findings, and discusses contributions for the research.
20. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: 2016
Janet L Rovenpor, Poonam Arora Moving Towards a New Language for Business to Promote Greater Sustainability
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In this paper, we argue and test the hypothesis that real progress towards greater sustainability in our society will occur only when individuals adopt a new language for business, use holistic thinking, and develop a robust set of economic, social and environmental measures performance.