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Displaying: 11-20 of 31 documents


part ii. book reviews
11. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 20
Mary Clare Imparato, Paul Farmer and Gustavo Gutierrez, In the Company of the Poor
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12. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 20
Richard S. Myers, Stephen M. Krason (editor), The Crisis of Religious Liberty: Reflections from Law, History, and Catholic Social Thought
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13. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 20
Joshua W. Schulz, Wilfred M. McClay and Ted V. McAllister (editors), Why Place Matters: Geography, Identity, and Civic Life in Modern America
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14. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 20
Adam Tate, John C. Pinheiro, Missionaries of Republicanism: A Religious History of the Mexican-American War
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15. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 20
David M. Klocek, Andrew Roberts, Napoleon: A Life
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16. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 20
Robert F. Gorman, S. Adam Seagrave, The Foundations of Natural Morality: On the Compatibility of Natural Rights and the Natural Law
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17. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 20
Regis Martin, John E. Thiel, Icons of Hope: The “Last Things” in Catholic Imagination
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part iii. public and church affairs
18. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 20
Stephen M. Krason, What Seems to Be a Morally-Mandated Public Policy Position Really May Note Be
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This was one of SCSS President Stephen M. Krason’s “Neither Left nor Right, but Catholic” columns that appeared during 2014 in Crisismagazine.com and The Wanderer and at his blog site (skrason.wordpress.com). It discusses how Catholic social teaching does not mandate particular public policies and must not be confused with a point of the teaching itself. It emphasizes that there can typically be many different policy approaches that can be used to make sure that moral demands are met.
19. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 20
Stephen M. Krason, Presidential Power: A Rescuer, Not a Nemesis
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This was one of SCSS President Stephen M. Krason’s “Neither Left nor Right, but Catholic” columns that appeared during 2014 in Crisismagazine.com and The Wanderer and at his blog site (skrason.wordpress.com). He argues that, despite the criticism of President Obama’s seemingly excessive exercise of executive power to further an ideologically leftist secularist agenda, the strong and maybe unprecedented use of presidential power after him may be the most certain way to try to restore weakened American constitutional principles and traditional liberties and to begin to reverse our serious cultural decay.
20. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 20
Stephen M. Krason, The Wrong Notion of Who and What Is God: At the Core of Modern Political Turmoil
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This was one of SCSS President Stephen M. Krason’s “Neither Left nor Right, but Catholic” columns that appeared during 2014 in Crisismagazine.com and The Wanderer and at his blog site (skrason.wordpress.com). He argues that the common strain running through such political developments as the rise of Islamism, modern political ideologies, and contemporary leftism is the fact that, one way or the other, they represent man trying to make himself God. To paraphrase Irving Babbitt and others, as the notion of God goes, so goes philosophy, and society and culture, and politics, and economics—the religious outlook is at the core of all other perspectives.