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Displaying: 11-20 of 40 documents


part ii. articles
11. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 24
Grazia Mangano Ragazzi St. Catherine of Siena: Discretion/Prudence as the Foundation of True Freedom
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In this article, the author shows how Catherine of Siena, a mystic who lived in Italy for thirty-three years in the second part of the fourteenth century, known for ecstasies and revelations, put discretion (and prudence, its synonym), the leading virtue in the moral life, at the core of her spirituality, thus becoming a real lover of the truth and a teacher of true freedom. The article contains bibliographical references for the reader’s further study of the writings (Dialogue, Letters, and Prayers) linked to this formidable figure, who was canonized in 1461 and proclaimed a Doctor of the Church in 1970. Catherine’s teaching, firmly anchored in what the Church and her great Doctors have always taught, remains to this day a rich treasure for spiritual growth.
12. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 24
Frederick D. Boley Towards a Rigorous Basis for a Natural Law Theory of Integration
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Fr. Bernard Lonergan (1904-1984) proposed that human desire can prove the existence of God. The structure of human thought implies a Final Answer to the set of all questions, which can only be what everyone calls “God”—but what implications does this fact have for human happiness, and for counseling? This paper argues that counseling must have, as its ultimate aim, helping people to know Goodness, Beauty, and Truth, which is God. The fact that we can observe the facts about human cognition means that Catholic Christian counselors can ethically and effectively work with people from any faith tradition.
13. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 24
James Berquist The Universal Good and the Hierarchy of Goods in the Natural Law
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The New Natural Law (NNL) tradition holds that ‘good’ in the first precept of natural law—Good is to be done and pursued, and evil is to be avoided—is an indeterminate good, and that it is universal precisely because it is indeterminate in its account. Based upon this, they further argue that there is no hierarchy amongst per se goods. Following Thomas Aquinas’s work on natural law and the good, I argue that the first good of practical reason is God himself, and that there is a hierarchy of per se goods from the perspective of practical reason. The central distinction I make is that the NNL tradition’s ‘good’ is only universal in its predication, whereas the good that moves practical reason has to have causal universality.
14. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 24
John Moran The Holes of an Ordinary Life: Tolstoy’s Pauline Revision
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Many modern readers of Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina view Anna’s passionate and scandalous romance with Vronsky as tragically heroic insofar as she desires nothing more than true love at any cost. These readers tend to view the story of Levin’s faith journey as inconsequential. This paper argues that such a reading is counter to Tolstoy’s intended message. Tolstoy intended to write a novel about the challenges of Christian faith in nineteenth century Russia. In doing so, he rewrote Paul’s Letter to the Romans in a manner consistent with his own emphasis upon the importance of the natural life—a life which embraces the natural cycle of birth and death and avoids the artificiality of urban, cosmopolitan life.
15. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 24
Eric Wearne Parent and Administrator Perceptions of Hybrid Homeschools
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This article reports the results of a series of interviews with “hybrid homeschool” parents and administrators. “Hybrid homeschools” are entities which generally operate as formal schools two to three days per week, with teachers, enrolled students, and brick and mortar buildings. The balance of the week, students learn as homeschoolers. Previous research into hybrid homeschools has consisted mainly of electronic surveys asking families why they choose this schooling model, what they value in education for their children, and demographic questions. The purpose of this study is to build on these surveys by conducting longer-form qualitative interviews with hybrid homeschool parents, teachers, and administrators. This study reports the results of a series of semi-structured interviews conducted with seven participants from four schools in two states over the course of the 2017–2018 school year. The results of these interviews support some of the broad suggestions made in previous electronic survey results, while also adding to what parents value in these schools, and why they choose them.
part iii. book reviews
16. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 24
Jerome C. Foss Patrick J. Deneen, Why Liberalism Failed
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17. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 24
D. Brian Scarnecchia Obianuju Ekocha, Target Africa: Ideological Neocolonialism in the Twenty-First Century
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18. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 24
Adam L. Tate Maura Jane Farrelly, Anti-Catholicism in America, 1620-1860
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19. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 24
Kevin H. Govern George P. Fletcher and Richard V. Meyer, editors, Law and The Bible, Volume One: A Collective Genesis
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20. Catholic Social Science Review: Volume > 24
Richard S. Myers Stefanus Hendrianto, S.J., editor, Priests, Lawyers, and Scholars: Essays in Honor of Robert J. Araujo, S J.
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