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11. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 48 > Issue: 1/2
Recent Dissertations
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12. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 47 > Issue: 1/2
Kenneth R. Westphal The Beginning of Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit: Introduction (Einleitung) and Consciousness: Sense Certainty, Perception, Force & Understanding
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13. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 47 > Issue: 1/2
David Ciavatta Hegel on the Parallels between Action and the Ontology of Life
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This paper shows that Hegel’s ontology of living beings provides us with indispensable conceptual resources for making sense of his account of the ontology of human action. For Hegel, living bodies are ontologically distinct in that their objective presence is thoroughly permeated by the self-reflexivity characteristic of subjectivity, and as such they cannot be adequately conceived in terms of categories (mechanistic, chemical, or generally causal categories) that are appropriate to inanimate, “subject-less” objects. It is argued that actions are similar in this regard, and like organic bodies they need to be conceived as self-realizing, self-articulating, dynamic wholes whose various material parts cannot be thought independently of their internal relations and their place in the whole. It is argued, further, that the categories Hegel appeals to in conceiving how organisms develop through stages are useful for making sense of how the objective shape of an action unfolds over time.
14. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 47 > Issue: 1/2
Douglas Finn Spiritual Consumption: Eating and the Christian Eucharist in Hegel
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This article seeks to gain a new perspective on Hegel’s Eucharistic theology by reading it through the lens of his philosophy of nature, specifically, his extensive discussion of animal eating, digestion, and excretion. This juxtaposition confirms Walter Jaeschke’s claim that Hegel, in offering a philosophical interpretation of the Eucharist, articulates a sacramental principle governing the whole of reality. In Hegel’s system, the biological process of assimilation serves as a master image of the work of Spirit across a number of natural, cultural, religious, and philosophical phenomena.
15. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 47 > Issue: 1/2
George di Giovanni A Second Note Regarding the Recent Translation of Hegel's "Greater Logic"
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16. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 47 > Issue: 1/2
John Burbidge In Memoriam: Joseph Charles Flay, 1932-2014
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17. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 47 > Issue: 1/2
New Books
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18. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 47 > Issue: 1/2
Recent Dissertations
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19. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1/2
Henry Southgate The Paradox of Irrationalism: The Logical Foundation of Hegel’s Philosophy of the Absurd
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I resolve a tension in Hegel’s views, which I call the “paradox of irrationalism,” in order to lay the logical foundation of Hegel’s philosophy of the absurd. The paradox is that Hegel both affirms and denies that the world is rational. While critics maintain that this presents a genuine problem for Hegel, I argue Hegel resolves this paradox by showing that reason constitutes itself through the irrational element that it itself grounds. I make my case by investigating the categories of diversity and contingency, which are central to the paradox of irrationalism and Hegel’s account of human agency.
a hegel-marx dialogue for the twenty-first century
20. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1/2
Philip J. Kain Hegel and the Failure of Civil Society
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On what might be called a Marxist reading, Hegel’s analysis of civil society accurately recognizes a necessary tendency toward a polarization of classes and the pauperization of the proletariat, a problem for which Hegel, however, has no solution. Indeed, Marxists think there can be no solution short of eliminating civil society. It is not at all clear that this standard reading is correct. The present paper tries to show how it is plausible to understand Hegel as proposing a solution, one that is similar to that of social democrats, and one that could actually work.