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1. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 48 > Issue: 1
Paul Lewis

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2. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 48 > Issue: 1
Collin D. Barnes

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Rating scales that link numbers to verbal labels are ubiquitous in social psychological research and are used to re-express individuals’ attitudes on wide-ranging matters in quantities that can be treated statistically. These re-expressions pay tribute to an objectivist framework, but at the expense of eclipsing the powers of personal knowing Polanyi attributes to other minds. This fact comes to the fore in the present paper through an investigation of Polanyi’s analysis of linguistic indeterminacy, indication and symbols, and the application of neurological models to persons who are competent to make sense of their own lives. Accrediting the result of this inquiry compels one dedicated to Polanyi’s thought to wonder how social psychology ought to be conceived. Clues to an answer appear in the educational bonds formed between mentors and pupils in the transmission of cultural lore.
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3. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 48 > Issue: 1
Richard W. Moodey

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Similarities between what Michael Polanyi and Daniel Kahneman wrote about the acts of judging and deciding are partly the result of taking seriously the findings of Gestalt psychology. Both men treat acts of judging and deciding as analogous to acts of perceiving. This similarity is the reason that the differences between Kahneman and Polanyi are mostly complementary, rather than contradictory. Among the things Polanyians can contribute to the interdisciplinary field of judgment and decision making are commitment, the from-to structure, and the image of leaping across a logical gap. Among the things Polanyians can learn from Kahneman is a pragmatic distinction between judging and deciding, a distinction between fast and slow thinking, and a heightened awareness of the many ways tacit heuristics and biases lead to mistaken judgments and bad decisions.
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4. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 48 > Issue: 1
Robert P. Hyatt

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In this essay, I contend that Polanyi’s view of metaphor as outlined in Meaning (1975), has important heuristic implications for understanding the way metaphor functions in trauma therapy. I also contend that in his seminal book on trauma, The Body Keeps the Score (2014), Bessel van der Kolk, M.D., although he rarely uses the term, relies on metaphor as a vital element in his treatment of trauma victims. Analysis of Van der Kolk’s practice further confirms and extends Polanyi’s view of the bodily roots of all knowledge. Juxtaposing Polanyi’s theory and Van der Kolk’s practice demonstrates how unspeakable trauma can be overcome through the embodied metaphoric/linguistic matrix of human speech.
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5. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 48 > Issue: 1
Phil Mullins

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Michael Polanyi, along with colleagues at University of Manchester, worked to produce the journal Humanitas, A University Quarterly for two years just after the end of World War II. This essay outlines how Polanyi’s two articles in Humanitas and other work on the journal reflect Polanyi’s developing philosophical perspective.
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book reviews
6. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 48 > Issue: 1
Phil Mullins

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7. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 47 > Issue: 3

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8. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 47 > Issue: 3
Paul Lewis

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9. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 47 > Issue: 3

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reflections on the calling of social thought
10. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 47 > Issue: 3
Struan Jacobs

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This article provides an extended review of The Calling of Social Thought, a collection of essays about the thought of social theorist Edward Shils. The article includes preliminary observations about Shils’ life and work, brief summaries of the essays included in the collection, and several suggestions aimed at encouraging additional study of Shils’ writings.
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11. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 47 > Issue: 3
Peter C. Blum

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This essay is a response to Struan Jacobs, “Recovering the Thought of Edward Shils,” which is an extended review of Adair-Toteff and Turner’s The Calling of Social Thought. It considers Edward Shils as a “stranger,” in the sense defined by Georg Simmel, relative to contemporary sociology. Christian Smith’s claim that American sociology is implicitly pursuing a “sacred project” is invoked, in contrast with Shils’ vision for consensual sociology. The expansion by CST to “Social Thought” as a calling (vocation), and its ties to science as understood by Polanyi, are strongly affirmed.
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12. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 47 > Issue: 3
Stephen Turner

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This is a brief response to comments by Struan Jacobs and Peter Blum on The Calling of Social Thought, Rediscovering the Work of Edward Shils, a recent collection of essays edited by Christopher Adair-Toteff and Stephen Turner. It identifies a distinctive contribution of Shils to the larger problem of the tacit.
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13. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 47 > Issue: 3
Alessio Tartaro

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Starting in 1946, Polanyi begins to criticize a comprehensive system of ideas that he names positivism. His criticism is twofold. On the one hand, it has the narrow aim of pointing out the inconsistencies of a positivist account of science, according to which the essence of scientific objec­tivity lies in establishing rigorous mathematical relations between measured variables employing fixed rules. On the other hand, it examines the broad assumptions underlying this view, namely radical empiricism and skeptical doubt. The present paper analyzes both aspects of this criticism, stressing its crucial role in the development of Polanyi’s philosophy.
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continued engagement with gábor bíró’s the economic thought of michael polanyi
14. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 47 > Issue: 3
Eduardo Beira

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This review article continues the forum from Tradition and Discovery 47/1 (February 2021) on Gábor Bíró’s book, The Economic Thought of Michael Polanyi (London: Routledge, 2019; 178 pp. Hardback: 9780367245634, £120.00; eBook: 9780429283178, £22.50).
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15. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 47 > Issue: 3
Gábor István Bíró Orcid-ID

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This response addresses some points raised by Eduardo Beira’s review article found in this issue of TAD and suggests new directions for future studies focusing on the economic thought of Michael Polanyi.
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16. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 47 > Issue: 2

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17. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 47 > Issue: 2
Paul Lewis

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polanyian reflections on the current state of democracy in the u. s.
18. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 47 > Issue: 2
Phil Mullins

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In response to the events of January 6 and the second impeachment trial, which made clear the fragility of democracy in the USA, several scholars whose work has appeared in this journal comment on one or more of the following questions: (1) What causes, epistemic and/or social, might Polanyi see as contributing to the incivility, rancor, and division that now characterize American politics? (2) What would Polanyi say about the events of January 6, as well as the events leading up to it? (3) What remedies might Polanyi suggest for rehabilitating our experiment in democracy?
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19. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 47 > Issue: 2
Paul Lewis

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In response to the events of January 6 and the second impeachment trial, which made clear the fragility of democracy in the USA, several scholars whose work has appeared in this journal comment on one or more of the following questions: (1) What causes, epistemic and/or social, might Polanyi see as contributing to the incivility, rancor, and division that now characterize American politics? (2) What would Polanyi say about the events of January 6, as well as the events leading up to it? (3) What remedies might Polanyi suggest for rehabilitating our experiment in democracy?
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20. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 47 > Issue: 2
Matthew D. Sandwisch

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In response to the events of January 6 and the second impeachment trial, which made clear the fragility of democracy in the USA, several scholars whose work has appeared in this journal comment on one or more of the following questions: (1) What causes, epistemic and/or social, might Polanyi see as contributing to the incivility, rancor, and division that now characterize American politics? (2) What would Polanyi say about the events of January 6, as well as the events leading up to it? (3) What remedies might Polanyi suggest for rehabilitating our experiment in democracy?
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