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journal and society information
1. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 2
Editorial Board and Submissions Guide
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2. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 2
Notes on Contributors
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focus on michael polanyi’s “what to believe”
3. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 2
Phil Mullins The Context of Michael Polanyi’s “What to Believe”
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This essay contextualizes Polanyi’s 1947 talk, “What to Believe.” After reviewing connections that probably led to Polanyi’s invitation to make this presentation at the Student Christian Movement conference in Manchester, I comment on Polanyi’s effort to compare the connection between understanding, believing and belonging in science, Christianity and “civic morality.” The main ideas in this talk should be viewed in relation to other writing from the mid-forties to the early fifties when Polanyi begins to develop his “fiduciary” philosophy as an alternative to what he views as the excessively skeptical disposition of the modern mind.
4. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 2
Michael Polanyi What to Believe
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“What to Believe” is a brief, hitherto unpublished talk that Michael Polanyi gave at a spring 1947 conference of the Student Christian Movement in Manchester, UK. Polanyi criticizes the way in which modern skepticism undercuts Christianity and what he calls “civic morality” and also promotes a misleading account of modern science. Polanyi outlines and compares the ways in which believing and belonging underlie understanding in science, Christianity and “civic morality.”
5. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 2
Gábor István Bíró Toward a Postcritical Economics: A Comment on Michael Polanyi’s “What to Believe”
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“What to Believe” is an important, short Polanyi piece that illuminates fiduciary and postcritical elements permeating various parts of his scholarship. This paper explores how Polanyi’s message about understanding, believing, and belonging developed in “What to Believe” fits into Polanyi’s economic liberalism. It discusses its relevance for his views about agents, markets, and the desirable methods of inquiry into the economy, and ends with reflections on the seeds of this new perspective in his earlier economics film project and its influence on Polanyi’s concept of economics.
6. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 2
Marty Folsom Science and Faith in a Game of Strategy
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In this article, Michael Polanyi engages a young audience in a confrontation of worldviews. He is resistant to a form of scientific belief that has defaulted to a naturalism that undermines the human experience of social cohesion. He proposes a return to Christian belief to provide a way toward a better future. But has he given us anything to trust in, other than switching parties with whom to affiliate? Does he actually direct us to consider the contents of “what to believe” or contend that we should believe in the Christian community for better moral outcomes? Is Polanyi’s final goal a deeper investigation of “what to believe” or to create a moral outcome he believes is missing? And is morality the final goal of belief?
essay
7. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 2
Nilanjan Raghunath Full Employment and the Cryptocurrency Economy: Lessons Learnt from Michael Polanyi
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Cryptocurrencies present a disruption to financial institutions, investments, and markets. Should governments therefore allow cryptocurrencies or ban them? How will they affect the flow of money? What form of economic justice should the cryptocurrency market adopt? Who should be involved in the determining of the economic justice? I claim that Michael Polanyi’s theories about employment, money, trade, and his overarching sociotechnical vision of society and the economy can help us understand the current labour market challenges and solutions in view of the digital economy.
book review
8. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 2
Phil Mullins Paul G. Tyson, De-Fragmenting Modernity: Reintegrating Knowledge with Wisdom, Belief with Truth, and Reality with Being
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journal and society information
9. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
Editorial Board and Submissions Guide
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10. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
Notes on Contributors
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reflections on the limits of liberalism
11. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
Will R. Jordan Land of the Lost
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12. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
Matthew D. Sandwisch Recovering Tradition
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13. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
Colin Cordner Tradition and Recollection
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14. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
Mark T. Mitchell Response
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essays
15. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
Jean-Baptiste Lamarche On the Clandestine Moral Order Embodied in Psychoanalytic Explanations of Actions
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In many contemporary societies, multitudes have used and are still using psychoanalysis to account for their actions to one another, by attributing to them repressed motives as their causes. The significance of this wide metaclinical use of psychoanalysis remains deeply misunderstood, as searchers predominantly treat psychoanalysis as a pure theory (despite the fact that it transformed social interactions), or as an asocial procedure, achieved by individuals escaping the moral requirements of society. To correct our vision of psychoanalysis, I rely on Michael Polanyi’s analysis of moral inversion and Charles W. Mills’ sketch of a psychoanalytic vocabulary of motives. An analysis of Freud’s theory of repression benefitting from those complementary insights shows that it allows contemporaries to assert backhandedly and indirectly their commitment to the cardinal values of an emerging individualist society.
16. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
Lindsay Atnip From “Meaning” to Reality: Toward a Polanyian Cognitive Theory of Literature
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This essay articulates a theory and practice of “reading toward reality” based on Polanyi’s conception of scientific discovery as proceeding from the apprehension of problems, guided by our tacit intimations of a new coherence that would resolve these problems, and a reality as the condition of such inquiry. I argue that, analogously, (good) literature poses problems of sense that refer us to our own tacit knowledge of the normative conditions of sense—conditions which underlie and sometimes contradict our conventional modes of sensemaking. Literature thus can educate us to those human realities which underlie our everyday social world and to the conditions by which we might more adequately judge and make sense of our experience.
17. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1
Walter Gulick Forms of Emergence
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In this essay I seek to clarify the unruly notion of emergence by describing three distinct varieties. I suggest that it is often fruitful to ascertain whether what emerges is an aspect of the physical world or a matter of novel meaning rather than quibble over whether emergence is an epistemological construct or is ontological in nature.
18. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 45 > Issue: 3
Editorial Board and Submissions Guide
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19. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 45 > Issue: 3
Paul Lewis Preface
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focus on the polanyi reader, “recovering truths”
20. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 45 > Issue: 3
Tex Sample Mickey Mantle and Ted Williams Hitting a Baseball: Using the Michael Polanyi Reader to Analyze Practices
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This paper interprets the batting styles of Mickey Mantle and Ted Williams utilizing key concepts of the Michael Polanyi Reader. In doing so it demonstrates the thoughtful organization of Polanyi’s work in the Reader, on the one hand, and the explanatory and descriptive power of Polanyi’s thought about practices on the other. Key Polanyi concepts utilized in this paper include: indwelling, the specifiable and the unspecifiable, connoisseurship, a-critical and critical judgment, knowledge and knowing as action, understanding, and commitment with its personal and universal poles.