Cover of Radical Philosophy Review
Already a subscriber? - Login here
Not yet a subscriber? - Subscribe here

Browse by:



Displaying: 1-20 of 724 documents


1. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 25 > Issue: 1
Harry van der Linden, Amy E. Wendling

view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Bookmark and Share
articles
2. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 25 > Issue: 1
Patrick Anderson

abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Leftist political theory remains trapped between two dominant conceptions of sovereignty: the liberal conception of popular sovereignty and the decisionist conception of sovereignty as the power to declare a state of exception. This essay offers a historical critique of the liberal and decisionist conceptions of sovereignty and develops a descriptive theory of aristocratic sovereignty, which is more suited to the history and the needs of radical political theory and praxis. By tracing the genealogy of sovereignty through early modern European political thought to the founding of the United States, this essay reveals the debilitating shortcoming of notions of sovereignty derived from both Carl Schmitt and the liberal tradition and provides a basis for a distinctively radical analysis of the sovereign aristocracy in Amerika.
Bookmark and Share
3. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 25 > Issue: 1
John Kaiser Ortiz

abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
This essay elaborates on Rodolfo Corky Gonzales’s “Yo soy Joaquín” as an inter-American articulation of the critical commitments of Chicanismo, which is here identified as the sociopolitical philosophy and ideological/normative leanings of Mexican Americans who call(ed) themselves Chicanas/os. The purpose of this essay is to show both how syncretism frames Chicanismo as a philosophy of growth and identity beyond borders and that this worldview can be critically explained as seeking alliances to communities and contexts defined by struggle. It engages the historical groundwork, philosophical influences on, and cultural ideals and values voiced through this poem by proponents of Chicanismo among its multiple forms and various representatives.
Bookmark and Share
4. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 25 > Issue: 1
Jon Mahoney

abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
In the United States, Protestant Christian identity is the dominant religious identity. Protestant Christian identity confers status privileges, yet also creates objectionable status inequalities. Historical and contemporary evidence includes the unfair treatment of Mormons, Native Americans, Muslims, and other religious minorities. Protestant Christian supremacy also plays a significant role in bolstering anti LGBTQ prejudice, xenophobia, and white supremacy. Ways that Protestant Christian identity correlates with objectionable status inequalities are often neglected in contemporary political philosophy. This paper aims to make a modest contribution towards filling that gap. Some forms of inequality linked to Protestant Christian supremacy can be characterized as domination and oppression. Other instances include barriers to fair equality of opportunity for self-determination. Adapting ideas from egalitarian political philosophy I propose an analysis of objectionable status inequality rooted in Protestant Christian supremacy. Alan Patten’s defense of an egalitarian principle for assessing the effects of law and policy is helpful for this task.
Bookmark and Share
5. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 25 > Issue: 1
Elizabeth Portella Orcid-ID

abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
In this article, the author argues that anti-colonial Marxism has been obscured and distorted by the contemporary post-Cold War imaginary. The author analyzes the historical-political context in which the narrative of Marxism and decolonization develop during and after the Cold War. Focusing on the writings of Frantz Fanon, Amílcar Cabral, Thomas Sankara, and Ernesto “Che” Guevara, the author reconstructs the “principles” of anti-colonial Marxism, attempting to ameliorate the scholarly deficit of theoretical literature on the anti-colonial Marxist tradition. In conclusion, the author argues that the “revolutionary theory” of these thinkers remains relevant to persistent, present-day conditions of neocolonialism and capitalist imperialism, becoming increasingly relevant with the progression of catastrophic climate change.
Bookmark and Share
book reviews
6. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 25 > Issue: 1
James Boettcher Orcid-ID

view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Bookmark and Share
7. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 25 > Issue: 1
Alan Chavoya

view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Bookmark and Share
8. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 25 > Issue: 1
Stefan Gandler, Sandra Loyoyla Guizar

view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Bookmark and Share
9. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 25 > Issue: 1
José Jorge Mendoza Orcid-ID

view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Bookmark and Share
10. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 25 > Issue: 1
Jorge Montiel

view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Bookmark and Share
11. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 25 > Issue: 1
Thomas Nail

view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Bookmark and Share
12. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 25 > Issue: 1
Justin Pack

view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Bookmark and Share
13. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 25 > Issue: 1
Charles Reitz Orcid-ID

view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Bookmark and Share
14. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 25 > Issue: 1

view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Bookmark and Share
15. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Harry van der Linden

view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Bookmark and Share
articles
16. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Nathan Eckstrand

abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Humanities advocates focus on demonstrating the humanities’ value to encourage participation. This advocacy is largely done through institutional means, and rarely taken directly to the public. This article argues that by reframing the theory of Direct Action, humanities advocates can effectively engage the public. The article begins by exploring three different understandings of the humanities: that they develop good citizenship, that they develop understanding, and that they develop critical thought. The article then discusses what Direct Action is and how it works. The article concludes by describing how to reframe Direct Action to suit the needs of the humanities, including potential actions that will achieve those ends. Humanities Direct Action must be seen as a debate and will focus on increasing critical thinking.
Bookmark and Share
17. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
John Harfouch

abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
I argue that while recognition is important for Middle Eastern and North African philosophers in academia and society, recognition alone should not define the anti-colonial movement. BDS provides a better model of engagement because it constructs identities in order to bring about material changes in the academy and beyond. In the first part of the essay, I catalog how MENA thought traditions have been and continue to be suppressed within the academy and philosophy in particular. I then sketch one possible path to better representation in philosophy by reading Fayez Sayegh’s analyses of Zionist colonialism and Palestinian non-being. In the second half of the essay, I argue that BDS is among the premier anti-colonial movements on American campuses today because it is a materialist anti-racist movement. Insofar as that movement is often shunned and prohibited, an anti-colonial society offers a membership in exile.
Bookmark and Share
18. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Tony Iantosca

abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
In this article, I explore the contrast between the recent George Floyd protests and the lockdowns immediately prior by situating these rebellions in the context of Foucault’s disciplinary society and subsequent scholarship on biopolitical management. I assert that the disciplinary mechanisms operative in finance/debt, policing and epidemiological management of the virus share similar epistemological assumptions stemming from liberal individualism. The revolutionary character of these uprisings therefore stems from their epistemological subversions of the predictable individual, and this figure’s spatiotemporal situatedness, a construction that helps power make claims on our collective future. The protests push us to see beyond a strict Foucauldian reading of this moment to uncover the metastatic status of identities in rebellion, which sustain resistance to disciplinary society’s epistemological foundations.
Bookmark and Share
symposium
19. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
José Jorge Mendoza

view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Bookmark and Share
20. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Carlos Alberto Sánchez

view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Bookmark and Share