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1. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 56 > Issue: 2
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2. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 56 > Issue: 2
Kenneth Liberman, The Status of Analytic Thinking in Tibetan Middle Way Philosophy
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Although the scholars of the Tibetan plateau were not philosophers in a European sense, the Tibetan academies have spent a millennium addressing ways in which formal analytic methods can assist epistemological investigation and best be applied to understanding the nature of existence. Throughout this time sharp debates were sustained over the proper role and function of critical analysis, during which they identified and described the many benefits and limitations of analytic thinking. Contemporary European philosophers studying the nature of formal analytic reason can gain insight by considering these Tibetan inquiries into the hermeneutics of analytic thinking.
3. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 56 > Issue: 2
Tracy Wietecha, On Method in Reading the De ente et essentia
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In this paper I explore methodological approaches to Aquinas’s argument for a real distinction between essence and existence in creatures in De ente et essentia. Joseph Owens and John Wippel examine the text through three stages that, they conclude, result in a demonstration for the real distinction. I contrast this approach with R. E. Houser, who argues that Aquinas’s text, which proceeds dialectically, must be understood within the context of its sources, namely, Avicenna’s Metaphysics of the Healing and The Intentions of the Philosophers by al-Ghazali. First, I will offer an evaluative judgment on the disagreement between Owens and Wippel on which stage Aquinas demonstrates a real distinction. Second, I will offer an evaluative judgment on the nature of the treatise as a whole by suggesting that the methodology of source-based contextualism offers another way to read the De ente.
4. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 56 > Issue: 2
Jasper van Buuren, The Difference between Moral Sources and Hypergoods
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In Sources of the Self Charles Taylor makes clear that both hypergoods and moral sources are essential to the moral life. Although hypergoods and moral sources are not the same thing, Taylor’s descriptions of these concepts are quite similar, and so their distinction requires interpretation. I propose that we interpret the difference on the basis of another distinction that is central to Taylor’s thinking: that between immanence and transcendence. Whereas a moral source transcends us, a hypergood is the value of our immanent way of relating to that moral source. This interpretation requires that we first differentiate between a narrow and a wide sense of “moral source.”
5. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 56 > Issue: 2
Timothy L. Brownlee, Ethicality and the Movement of Recognition in Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit
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In this paper I consider the contribution that Hegel’s discussion of ethicality (Sittlichkeit) makes to his account of recognition in the Phenomenology of Spirit. While the famous relation of lord and bondsman might prompt us to think of all failures of recognition as failures of reciprocity, Hegel’s account of ethicality shows that it is possible for forms of social life to be structured so that no one is recognized. This failure of recognition is unique since its source does not lie in a lack of reciprocity between individuals but in the absence of an explicit and shared conception of the “self.” In conclusion I point to the importance of the idea of the self to Hegel’s account of reciprocal intersubjective recognition in the text and contrast it with Pippin’s recent interpretation.
6. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 56 > Issue: 2
Jeanne Schuler, A Brilliant Failure: Hegel and Marx Assess the Enlightenment
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Hegel and Marx both understand the Enlightenment as a failed project at liberation. For Hegel, the failure lies in the form of consciousness that he calls pure insight. For Marx, the failure lies in the commercial practices that perpetuate pure insight. Pure insight may win its battles with superstitious faith, but its view of human activity as purely subjective risks lapsing into skepticism. Pure insight cannot arrive at the truth that it seeks and ultimately reduces all things to utility. Utility is the pseudo-notion that imposes its own emptiness on things, thereby unleashing the violence of terror. Marx, too, regards utility as an imposter, one that offers a phony answer to the question “What gives commodities their value?” while disguising the exploitation inherent in capitalist society. The essay closes with a discussion of how Max Horkheimer’s account of instrumental reason presupposes the purist splits of the Enlightenment that it seeks to overcome.
7. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 56 > Issue: 2
Damián Bravo Zamora, On the Soberer Conclusions that May Be Drawn from Kantian and Cantorian Antinomies
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This paper explores the connection between Kant’s first antinomy and the set-theoretical paradox of the largest cardinal. The lesson to be drawn is that we should refrain from reifying (i.e., treating as an individual object or thing) the collections that generate the antinomies: the collection of all spatio-temporal objects (the world) in the case of Kant’s first antinomy, the collection of all objects whatsoever (the universe) in the case of the Cantorian paradox. This conclusion is not only one that we are entitled to draw but also one that does not generate new philosophical problems of its own. In this respect it is more attractive than other contemporary reactions to the paradoxes of set theory.
book reviews
8. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 56 > Issue: 2
Stephen Chamberlain, Ethics as a Work of Charity: Thomas Aquinas and Pagan Virtue. By David Decosimo
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9. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 56 > Issue: 2
Aaron Pidel, S.J., Analogia Entis: Metaphysics: Original Structure and Universal Rhythm. By Erich Przywara
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10. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 56 > Issue: 2
Christina M. Gschwandtner, Agamben’s Coming Philosophy: Finding a New Use for Theology. By Colby Dickinson and Adam Kotsko
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