Already a subscriber? Login here
Not yet a subscriber? - Subscribe here

Displaying: 1-10 of 51 documents


articles
1. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 92 > Issue: 4
Daniel Shields Everything in Motion is Put in Motion by Another: A Principle in Aquinas’s First Way
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
I argue for a novel reading of the mover principle used in Aquinas’s motion proofs for God’s existence. Many interpret Aquinas’s principle as holding that everything in motion is moved by something else currently in contact with it. Others, following James Weisheipl, understand the principle as claiming only that everything being moved is being moved by something else. I argue against both readings and hold that the principle means that everything in motion is moved by something else—whether that something else simply set it in motion or is currently moving it by contact. By looking closely at Aquinas’s inductive argument for the mover principle, I show that simultaneity between mover and moved is not necessary on Aquinas’s view. My interpretation allows me to respond to objections to Aquinas’s act-potency argument for the mover principle more convincingly than others, and sets the groundwork for robust engagement between Thomism and modern science.
2. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 92 > Issue: 4
Nathan Rockwood Hume on Laws and Miracles
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Hume famously argues that our past experience of the laws of nature provide us with decisive reason to believe that any testimony of a miracle is false. In this paper, I argue that the laws of nature, as such, give us no reason at all to believe that the testimony of a miracle is false. I first argue that Hume’s proof is unsuccessful if we assume the Humean view of laws, and then I argue that Hume’s proof is unsuccessful even if we assume a governing view of laws. I conclude that regardless of which kind of view we adopt, the fact that a miracle is a violation of the laws of nature does not give us any reason to believe it did not happen.
3. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 92 > Issue: 4
Thomas DePauw The Principles of Distinction in Material Substances in the Philosophy of St. Thomas and St. Albert
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
In this paper we argue that the problem of the one and the many, as first proposed in the West by Parmenides, can be resolved without recourse to either monism or nominalism by an appeal to distinct though mutually ordered principles of distinction in the realm of material substances, namely that of material individuation, distinction according to form, and supposital distinction. This solution, rooted in St. Thomas Aquinas and St. Albert the Great, maintains that what distinguishes one material substance from any other substance absolutely is the agency of the Divine Intellect. This agency elicits in the created material substance the actuality of the relation of creation, which is the cause or principle that, in inhering in the ens creatum as a property subsisting in it, sustains the material substance in its mode of being as suppositum by formally perfecting its distinction with reference to God the Creator.
4. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 92 > Issue: 4
Martin Cajthaml Dietrich von Hildebrand’s Moral Epistemology
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
The first part of the paper focuses on the elements of von Hildebrand’s general and moral epistemology that can be related to Brentano’s philosophy. The salient concepts discussed are those of Kenntnisnahme (taking cognizance) and Stellungnahme (response). I explain their meaning and show their role in von Hildebrand’s critical assessment of Brentano’s conception of the acts of higher (or correct) love and hate. In the second part of the paper, I argue that von Hildebrand’s material ethics is based on the basic ontological presupposition of Scheler’s material value ethics and that it is, therefore, to be considered a version of it, notwithstanding some quite basic differences from Scheler in other respects. In the third part of the paper, I discuss von Hildebrand’s most important analyses of the different epistemic acts through which values are given. The salient concepts are those of the seeing and feeling of values.
5. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 92 > Issue: 4
Jeff D’Souza The Self-Absorption Objection and Neo-Aristotelian Virtue Ethics
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
This paper examines one of the central objections levied against neo-Aristotelian virtue ethics: the self-absorption objection. Proponents of this objection state that the main problem with neo-Aristotelian accounts of moral motivation is that they prescribe that our ultimate reason for acting virtuously is that doing so is for the sake of and/or is constitutive of our own eudaimonia. In this paper, I provide an overview of the various attempts made by neo-Aristotelian virtue ethicists to address the self-absorption objection and argue that they all fall short for one reason or another. I contend that the way forward for neo-Aristotelian virtue ethicists is to reject the view that the virtuous agent ought to organize her life in a way that is ultimately good for her, and instead adopt a more expansive conception of her ultimate end, one in which no special preference is given to her own good.
6. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 92 > Issue: 4
Adam D. Bailey Shared Intention and Cooperation with Evil
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
In a recent essay, Charles F. Capps takes issue with a permissive interpretation of St. Alphonsus Liguori’s influential understanding of cooperation with evil, and develops a more stringent interpretation. In response, I argue that Capps relies on a particular conception of what it is for a cooperator to share a wrongdoer’s bad intention, that this conception of intention sharing is not plausible because it is overly inclusive, and, that on account of this over-inclusiveness, it yields mistaken moral judgments. I then develop and defend an alternative conception of intention sharing.
book reviews
7. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 92 > Issue: 4
Sarah Borden Sharkey The Concept of Woman. Volume III: The Search for Communion of Persons, 1500–2015. By Sr. Prudence Alle
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
8. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 92 > Issue: 4
Karen R. Zwier The Believing Scientist: Essays on Science and Religion. By Stephen M. Barr
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
9. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 92 > Issue: 4
Virgil Martin Nemoianu Wagering on an Ironic God: Pascal on Faith and Philosophy. By Thomas S. Hibbs
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
10. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 92 > Issue: 4
Christopher Stephen Lutz Ethics in the Conflicts of Modernity: An Essay on Desire, Practical Reasoning, and Narrative. By Alasdair MacIntyre
view |  rights & permissions | cited by