Translational Hermeneutics

Translational Hermeneutics
The First Symposium
2015, ISBN 978-606-8266-42-8
Editors: Radegundis Stolze, John Stanley, Larisa Cercel

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Displaying: 1-10 of 18 documents


1. Translational Hermeneutics: Year > 2015
Einleitung
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2. Translational Hermeneutics: Year > 2015
Larisa Cercel, Radegundis Stolze, John Stanley Hermeneutics as a Research Paradigm
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The historical overview covering Schleiermacher and the disciplinary status of translational hermeneutics was written by Cercel, the sections on important concepts and research within the paradigm of translational hermeneutics was authored by Stolze, and Stanley wrote the last three sectionsdealing with language games, a concrete research project and the role of phenomenology in research. The text was geared towards providing some background information on translational hermeneutics, a field which has bearing not only on the practice of translation but also on research in TS. From the vantage point of translational hermeneutics, research in translation studies takes its point of departure from the translator’sperspective: The guiding question is one centered on how a translator deals with the texts he or she has to translate.
3. Translational Hermeneutics: Year > 2015
Douglas Robinson Fourteen Principles of Translational Hermeneutics
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Th is paper organizes the hermeneutical study of translation into fourteen principles, the fi rst six borrowed from a paper (in this volume) by Larisa Cercel, John Stanley, and Radegundis Stolze entitled “Hermeneutics as a Research Paradigm”: subjectivity (1), historicity (2), phenomenology (3), process (4), holism (5), and reflection (6). The next seven are a compilation of the author’s own research agenda “beyond” or “outside” classicalhermeneutics, but arguably congruent with and supportive of a hermeneutical project: social constructivism (7), iterability (8), multiple subjectivities (9), dialogism (10), the double-bind (11), performativity (12), and rhetoric (13). Th e last (14) is somatics: It’s not enough to study how we interpret; we have toexplore how we work in groups (almost always unconsciously) to regulate interpretation. Without social regulation, imperfect and incomplete as it is, incapable as it is of imposing robotic conformity on human communication, interpretation remains a subjective will o’ the wisp, an evanescent connectivity that is easily dismissed as sheer solipsistic fantasy.
4. Translational Hermeneutics: Year > 2015
Lothar Černý Hidden Hermeneutics: The Beginnings of Translation Studies in Germany after World War II
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This paper introduces some of the most infl uential fi gureheads in the emerging field of Translation Studies in East and West Germany after World War II. It outlines the reasons why Translation Studies parted from the traditional hermeneutical approach to translation. On the other hand it traces theresurgence of a new hermeneutical inquiry into the process of translation in the new, basically linguistic approaches and their science orientation.
5. Translational Hermeneutics: Year > 2015
John Wrae Stanley Translational Hermeneutics and Inverted Worlds: Some Reflections on Paradigms
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Translational Hermeneutics – a discipline aspiring to approach human communication from a hermeneutical vantage point – is in its infancy. The presentations delivered at the first Hermeneutics and Translation Studies Symposium – most of which shared an interest in merging hermeneutics withtranslation studies – were marked by a strong diversity. The widely differing perspectives and approaches embodied by the presentations make it difficult to delineate what Translational Hermeneutics actually is. The purpose of this essay is to prodand stimulate the debate. The essay begins with an analysis of the Kadean perspective on translation studies, for it offers a sharp contrast to any hermeneutical approach. Then the essay proposes a hermeneutical lineage, one emphasizing the phenomenological roots of the tradition running from Husserl, through Heidegger and up to Gadamer. The purpose of the historical overview is to define some aspects of the hermeneuticaltradition that Translational Hermeneutics rests upon. In so doing, some essential cornerstones will be laid for Translational Hermeneutics. In particular, the link to Husserl’s phenomenology not only sets high standards regarding scientific rigor, it also distances the Translational Hermeneutics from the approach taken in the natural sciences. The link to phenomenology requires that we not only re-examine the notion of objectivity but also enrich and develop the concept of “subjectivity.” The interdependence between the “subject” and “object” in experience robs the objects of their predominant role as a source for truth claims and stability in communication. The loss of this foundation for research and stability in communication leaves a vacuum that has to be filled within the paradigm of Translational Hermeneutics.
6. Translational Hermeneutics: Year > 2015
Brian O’Keeffe Prologue to a Hermeneutic Approach to Translation
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The purpose of this essay is to explore the place Hans-Georg Gadamer makes for the activity of translation within his philosophy of interpretation. In general terms, the interest of Gadamer’s approach lies in the effort to inscribe translation within what is described as the ‘hermeneutic circle’. This essay accordingly offers a brief, but detailed account of the Gadamerian arc of interpretation, but suggests that the critical issues – along the lines suggested by Werner Hamacher in his book Premises – concern the way in which the circle begins to turn, and furthermore, how one actually enters the hermeneutic circle. If these are matters basic to the Gadamerian way with textual interpretation tout court, the principal claim of this essay is that it is the translatorwho experiences the most serious diffi culties in beginning, and indeed, in entering the ambit of hermeneutics. In detailing these particular difficulties, one reaches a limit-case of the hermeneutical interpreter – the translator as one to whom Gadamer grants a privileged place in his philosophy, but also as one who reveals to hermeneutics the nature of the problems that beset hermeneutic philosophy from the outset.
7. Translational Hermeneutics: Year > 2015
Radegundis Stolze Faktoren einer hermeneutischen Übersetzungskompetenz
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Hermeneutical translation is based on the conviction that one first has to understand a text before being able to present the message once again in another language. The objective is precision in the sense of an authentic presentation of that message in the translation. Th is task requests a dynamical translation competence that interlinks knowledge-based, refl exive and strategic elements. Th e article off ers a systematic description of the factors involved in such a competence. Specifically, it addresses the necessary cultural and technical knowledge, hermeneutical fields of orientation as to how to comprehend texts and formulate their translation, and the issue of the translator’s intellectual growth brought about by lifelong learning and the inter-relation between various translation assignments. Hermeneutical translation competence, which can be presented in a systemic model,proves to be an informed, self-critical, dynamic and fl exibly networking approach to texts and their worlds.
8. Translational Hermeneutics: Year > 2015
Miriam Paola Leibbrand Der Beitrag der hermeneutischen Dolmetschforschung zur Begrundung einer Translationshermeneutik
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The doctoral thesis Verstehen verstehen: Modellierung epistemologischer und methodologischer Grundlagen für die Konferenz - dolmetschforschung ausgehend vom Simultandolmetschen in die B-Sprache (Modelling Comprehension in Interpreting Studies: Epistemological and Methodological Foundations for Research on Conference Interpreting; with an Initial Concentration on Simultaneous Interpreting into the B-Language) (Leibbrand2009a/ 2011a) is situated thematically in the discipline of Interpreting Studies (Pöchhacker 2004). After briefly outlining the issues treated in my doctoral thesis, this essay tries to show what contribution the approach called “Hermeneutical Research into Interpreting” (Hermeneutische Dolmetschforschung) can make to the new field of Translational Hermeneutics. In addition, the essay demonstrates how this approach can fecundate the discussion concerning Hermeneutics and Cognitive Science on the one hand and, on the other hand, provide insights into the question concerning whether or not Hermeneutics and Empirical Research are conflicting paradigms. For Hermeneutische Dolmetschforschung, Translational Hermeneutics should not restrict its research to understanding in translation per se; rather it must go beyond this and also explore how understanding itself can serve as a research method and as the foundation for an epistemological attitude. The power and productivity of Hermeneutics for building a paradigm in Translation Studies is not limited to observing and explaining the processes and products of translation. Neither is it limited to contributing to the discussion of methods adopted by the translator/interpreter in translating or interpreting. The question of method includes the questioning individual who is actively and hermeneutically reflecting on his/her own research activities. The new methodology resulting from my investigations is called Verstehende Forschung and it is grounded on the epistemological attitude of Epistemologische Off enheit. Th is methodological approach is qualitative, notquantitative. Hermeneutical Research into Interpreting defines the process of understanding while interpreting (comprehension) as Produktionsorientiertes dynamisches Verstehen. However, the core of this new approach is built by the methodological dimension of Hermeneutics. Therefore, a contribution geared towards solving the LAP-versus-ESP-controversy in Translation Studies lies at the very heart of Hermeneutical Research into Interpreting.
9. Translational Hermeneutics: Year > 2015
Rainer Kohlmayer Die Stimme im Text als tertium comparationis beim Literaturubersetzen
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By neglecting to integrate the final step of rhetorics into theory, i. e. pronuntiatio and actio, modern text linguistics passed a theoretical deficit on to modern translation studies. Literary texts must be read aloud in order to realize the acoustic potential programmed into the text by the author. The rhetorical tradition of writing and reading aloud was marginalized in the course of the 18th century when reading became a private and silent affair. Herder’s (and others’) foregrounding of the ‘tone’ or the ‘voice’ in literary texts and their translations is a theoretical attempt to return to the holistic view of text production, integrating performance into the process of literary production and reception. In practice, however, great literary translators always paid attention to the ‘voice in the text’. The tradition of orality – distinguishing precise voices in literary texts – seems to come to an end in Jelinek’s anti-individualistic texts.
10. Translational Hermeneutics: Year > 2015
Adriana Şerban Writing, Directing and Translating Poetic Film
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In this paper I examine the possibility of a holistic approach to audiovisual translation which puts the emphasis on people, context(s) and interpretation(s). I consider the relation between image, sound, and the spoken and/or written word in the audiovisual medium, and then explore some of the issues involved in creating poetic films, in particular the choice of language or silence. Th e translator’s mediating voice is not always easy to observe in subtitles. For they are governed by a complex set of constraints and conventions, to such an extent that it may appear there are no significant choices to be made, choices which, if noticed, might reflect competing interpretations. I endeavour to trace the translators’ voice in a small collectionof poetic films translated into English and French, and explain that it manifests through more or less felicitous subtitling choices, and sometimes through failure.