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1. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 25 > Issue: 1
Phil Mullins Preface
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2. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 25 > Issue: 1
News and Notes
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3. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 25 > Issue: 1
Schedule for November 1998 Polanyi Society Meeting
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4. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 25 > Issue: 1
Walter B. Gulick Prolegomena to a Polanyian Theory of Practice: A Critique of Stephen Turner’s Account
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Stephen Turner explores the social dimensions of practices, probing to see if the notion of a shared practice can be understood as a cause or mechanism whereby knowledge arises and is used. When he concludes that practices are not some mysterious collective object but are best explained as individual habits, he thereby rejects an attenuated notion of practice and replaces it with a needlessly atomistic notion in which habits carry the full burden of explanation. Turner makes use of aspects of Polanyi’s thought, but this article suggests ways in which a fuller appropriation of Polanyian insights can salvage a social, telic notion of practices that illuminates human behavior.
5. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 25 > Issue: 1
Stephen Turner Polanyian in Spirit: A Reply to Gulick
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Walter Gulick criticizes The Social Theory of Practices for its non-Polanyian views of the problem of the objective character of tacit knowledge, its insistence that there should be plausible causal mechanisms that correspond to claims about tacit knowledge and its “social” transmission, and its denial of the social, telic character of practices. In this reply it is asserted that the demand for causally plausible mechanisms is not scientistic or for that matter non-Polanyian, that the book has a view of objectivity that parallels Polanyi’s own, and that the idea of telic practices is subject to the same problems over mechanism as non-telic ones, with the additional problem that telic concepts need supra-individual feedback mechanisms, of which no plausible examples exist. In each case, the non-social or personal explanations of the phenomenon of “practice” are better than the “social” ones. The discussion concludes by posing the challenge of connectionism to Polanyi, as well as the opportunity it presents.
6. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 25 > Issue: 1
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7. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 25 > Issue: 1
J. S. Pflug Stephania Jha’s Integrative Interpretation of Polanyi
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This review essay discusses Stephania Jha’s account of Polanyi’s thought in her dissertation, Michael Polanyi’s Integrative Philosophy (Harvard University, Gutman Education Library: Thesis J47, 1995); I criticize her understanding and use of Polanyi’s notion of “from-at” integrations.
8. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 25 > Issue: 1
Notes on Contributors
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9. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 25 > Issue: 1
S. R. Jha Polanyi’s Integrative Philosophy and My New Interpretation: A Response to Pflug’s Review
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In this response to Jeff Pflug’s review of my dissertation Michael Polanyi’s Integrative Philosophy, I note that Pflug focused on my discussion of possible extension of Polanyi’s epistemology; he has also taken my statements on scientific truth out of context. In addition, he ignored the four major elements of the dissertation, thereby not giving the reader a “map” to the meaning and the rationale of the work – an intellectual biography of Polanyi.
10. Tradition and Discovery: The Polanyi Society Periodical: Volume > 25 > Issue: 1
Philip Mirowski Economics, Science, and Knowledge: Polanyi vs. Hayek
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The relationship between Friedrich Hayek and Michael Polanyi is documented and explored with respect to philosophy and economics. Their respective positions on epistemology and science are shown to fundamentally govern their differences with regard to the efficacy of government policy with regard to the economy.